Up North - Painting the Weather Up North

Mon Jan 17 00:00:00 2011

January 17, 2011

Exhibition

Up North - Painting the Weather Up North 160 Up North - Painting the Weather Up North Terri Quinn Eric McConnachie deborah harris

Gisèle Boulianne

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

http://giseleboulianne.com/   

Born in Jonquiere, Quebec, Gisele Boulianne currently lives near Quebec City. Gisele has taught painting for twenty years. In order to deepen her knowledge and explore new career paths, she completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Laval University in Quebec City and received the second prize of the public during the exhibition of graduation. Her contemporary, colorful and expressive style reflects the intensity of urban life. Gisele's work uses photography, painting, collage, and painting to create a dynamic composition of lines and forms of energy of the 21st century. Determined and bold gestures that traverse the canvas, she depicts an act of theater not far from the dream world. In 2005, Gisele received an honorable mention award from the jury at the Montreal International Festival of Arts. In 2008, the International Festival of Plastic Arts of Monastir in Tunisia awarded Gisele the first Excellence Award from the Governor of Tunisia. Most recently, she participated in the National Salon of Fine Arts at the Carousel du Louvre in Paris. A professional member of RAAV, Consolidation of visual artists from Quebec, Gisele Boulianne is listed in various collections of Quebec Transport Commission of Quebec, Emco Building Products, Alcoa, Toyota and others. She is also represented in several art galleries in Quebec, including Emeraude (Montreal), Crescent Hill (Mississauga), Gallery C2 (Trois-Rivieres), C. Genest (Cap-Sante). Gisele has also participated in national and international exhibitions in Toronto, New York, Puerto Rico, Portland (Oregon), Monastir (Tunisia), Montreux (Swisserland), Paris...

Artist Statement

I think, I memorize and I structure compositions that proposes a link to time and space. Deep into the act of painting, I free my inner pulsions on the canvas and I create a gesture that paints rythm and make the scenes vibrate under color. I then add calligraphy to the artwork that shares my deepest intimate reflexions.        

Artist

Gisèle Boulianne Gisèle Boulianne

Floyd Kuptana ... sculpted from stone and spirit

Tue Sep 27 01:00:00 2011

Saturday, October 1, 2:30 - 5:30pm

In early September sculptor Floyd Kuptana created one of the pieces for the current show onsite -- in front of the gallery. See images, video of the sculpture's evolution and other details here.

 Floyd Kuptana was born in the Northwest Territories and has lived and worked in Toronto for thirty years. The stone sculptures now on display at Gallery Arcturus -- with the exception of one -- were all created in the last year.

 In Floyd's work no two pieces are the same -- as he says, "each stone is different". He goes into the stone and brings out what he finds there; an encounter with a being that he liberates. The viewer is given a form whose shape and texture convey an experience.

 Every one of his figures seem to be animated from within, expressing a joy and fluidity of movement. During the month of September people passing along Gerrard Street were able to observe Floyd working outside next to the sidewalk. In choosing the stone he seemed to know immediately -- just from seeing -- which one he wanted to work with. His first cuts were sure and decisive; there was no deliberation.

 Following the veins and cracks, he is led by the rhythm of the stone. One day was spent with the rough cut, removing what impedes the form. The next day was articulating the shape; fine tuning the subtle movement and flow. This was followed by hours of sanding. As the soapstone was heated and polished over and over it turned from white to golden amber.

  There was incredible intimacy and ease between Kuptana and the emerging figure. At the same time, he was not distracted by the traffic or self-conscious when passersby stopped to watch.

  The pieces have found their places in the upstairs exhibit space at Gallery Arcturus. As we enter, it seems there is a circus of beings moving in the space, a celebration we are invited to secretly witness.

Exhibition

 Floyd Kuptana was born in the Northwest Territories and has lived and worked in Toronto for thirty years. The stone sculptures now on display at Gallery Arcturus -- with the exception of one -- were all created in the last year.

 In Floyd's work no two pieces are the same -- as he says, "each stone is different". He goes into the stone and brings out what he finds there; an encounter with a being that he liberates. The viewer is given a form whose shape and texture convey an experience.

 Every one of his figures seem to be animated from within, expressing a joy and fluidity of movement. During the month of September people passing along Gerrard Street were able to observe Floyd working outside next to the sidewalk. In choosing the stone he seemed to know immediately -- just from seeing -- which one he wanted to work with. His first cuts were sure and decisive; there was no deliberation.

 Following the veins and cracks, he is led by the rhythm of the stone. One day was spent with the rough cut, removing what impedes the form. The next day was articulating the shape; fine tuning the subtle movement and flow. This was followed by hours of sanding. As the soapstone was heated and polished over and over it turned from white to golden amber.

  There was incredible intimacy and ease between Kuptana and the emerging figure. At the same time, he was not distracted by the traffic or self-conscious when passersby stopped to watch.

  The pieces have found their places in the upstairs exhibit space at Gallery Arcturus. As we enter, it seems there is a circus of beings moving in the space, a celebration we are invited to secretly witness.

Floyd Kuptana  ...  sculpted from stone and spirit 160 Floyd Kuptana  ...  sculpted from stone and spirit Floyd Kuptana

what goes and what remains: A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE

Sat Apr 30 00:00:00 2011

Saturday April 30, 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm

c o l l a b o r a t I o n

 

 

an idea arises between two minds

 

a seed planted as potential

 

has its own momentum

 

we each engage in its unfolding

 

a dialogue between

 

an expression, a technique

 

tools shared and invented

 

what’s mine   what’s yours

 

becoming indecipherable

 

the finished piece emerges as its own entity

 

something other than either one could do

 

The body of work entitled “what goes and what remains… A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE” creates a visual dialogue between figure and ground using photographs of statues, taken throughout the city, which are then placed by the artist within images of decaying environments. Ayokah’s photos of public sculptures, demolition sites and weathered back alleys come into relationship with each other through collage, the surroundings echoing the colour and gesture of the sculpted forms.

The intricacy of collage does not usually lend itself to many hands. Sharing a vision in this medium is new territory, especially when working with someone you know beyond an artistic relationship. The collaboration with deborah harris, who is artist in residence at Gallery Arcturus as well as Ayokah’s mother, seemed to those of us observing them, more like the energetic preparation of a family meal.

The viewer, upon entering the gallery will only be aware of the pieces themselves as they exquisitely merge figure and ground. The perspective in these photographs invites us to see our vulnerability to time.

Toronto, April 12, 2011 – Gallery Arcturus presents a show of new photography and montage by Ayokah, in collaboration with Deborah Harris, from April 30 to June 11, 2011. The opening reception is Saturday, April 30.

 The body of work entitled “what goes and what remains… A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE” creates a visual dialogue between figure and ground using photographs of statues, taken throughout the city, which are then placed by the artist within images of decaying environments. Ayokah’s photos of public sculptures, demolition sites and weathered back alleys come into relationship with each other through collage, the surroundings echoing the colour and gesture of the sculpted forms.

 The intricacy of collage does not usually lend itself to many hands. Sharing a vision in this medium is new territory, especially when working with someone you know beyond an artistic relationship. The collaboration with Deborah Harris, who is artist in residence at Gallery Arcturus as well as Ayokah’s mother, seemed to those of us observing them, more like the energetic preparation of a family meal.

 The viewer, upon entering the gallery will only be aware of the pieces themselves as they exquisitely merge figure and ground. The perspective in these photographs invites us to see our vulnerability to time.

-- --

Also please note:

 In the upper exhibit space of Gallery Arcturus the photographic show “sightlines” opens Saturday, April 30. Featuring photographs by Brian O'Dea and James LaTrobe, the show runs April 30 to June 11, 2011.

 Select images can be seen at http://arcturus.ca/display.php?g=1&s=2011-04-30-sightlines

 

 Gallery Arcturus is supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art.

Exhibition

Toronto, April 12, 2011 – Gallery Arcturus presents a show of new photography and montage by Ayokah, in collaboration with Deborah Harris, from April 30 to June 11, 2011. The opening reception is Saturday, April 30.

 The body of work entitled “what goes and what remains… A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE” creates a visual dialogue between figure and ground using photographs of statues, taken throughout the city, which are then placed by the artist within images of decaying environments. Ayokah’s photos of public sculptures, demolition sites and weathered back alleys come into relationship with each other through collage, the surroundings echoing the colour and gesture of the sculpted forms.

 The intricacy of collage does not usually lend itself to many hands. Sharing a vision in this medium is new territory, especially when working with someone you know beyond an artistic relationship. The collaboration with Deborah Harris, who is artist in residence at Gallery Arcturus as well as Ayokah’s mother, seemed to those of us observing them, more like the energetic preparation of a family meal.

 The viewer, upon entering the gallery will only be aware of the pieces themselves as they exquisitely merge figure and ground. The perspective in these photographs invites us to see our vulnerability to time.

-- --

Also please note:

 In the upper exhibit space of Gallery Arcturus the photographic show “sightlines” opens Saturday, April 30. Featuring photographs by Brian O'Dea and James LaTrobe, the show runs April 30 to June 11, 2011.

 Select images can be seen at http://arcturus.ca/display.php?g=1&s=2011-04-30-sightlines

 

 Gallery Arcturus is supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art.

what goes and what remains: A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE 320 what goes and what remains: A VULNERABLE EXISTENCE Ayokah deborah harris

test

Thu May 5 00:00:00 2011

test

test test

sightlines

Sat Apr 30 00:00:00 2011

Saturday April 30, 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Lines permeate our world and perform an infinite number of dynamic functions visually.

Brian uses a cellphone to record ice and snow formations on his deck, then overlays the digital images with computer generated lines and patterns, often in sequences.

James uses a digital SLR camera to capture photographs with inherent line action.

The two friends then combine several of their works into one sequence.

 

--

 

More of James LaTrobe's images can be seen at  dragonwhistle.ca

Exhibition

sightlines 320 sightlines James LaTrobe Brian O'Dea

Ryerson Theatre School

Mon Apr 18 00:00:00 2011

 

Exhibition

Ryerson Theatre School 320 Ryerson Theatre School

deborah harris

Fri May 27 00:00:00 2011

deborah harris was born in Toronto. Her view of personal history is that you don’t need to know the details of a person's life in order to perceive the wholeness those experiences have given shape to. So saying, she describes herself as someone who has learned through rigorous observation of self, of others and of the inner and outer world. Through drawing, painting and collage she is able to explore further those perceptions as they manifest in a gesture of now.

She left formal school at sixteen, travelled to Africa and Greece and upon her return she completed teachers training in Yoga and in massage therapy.

She returned to school in 1989, majoring in set and costume design at Ryerson Theatre School. She was teacher and custodian with Nusa Prijatelj of the Annex Art Centre in Toronto. Her first five shows were at the Annex Art Centre.

In 1998 she was asked to take the position of Artist in Residence at Gallery Arcturus, a position that was created to enable her to work in the gallery, giving workshops to groups and meeting with those who choose to inquire into the nature of objective art.

 

deborahharris.ca

Artist

deborah harris deborah harris

'as different as' night and day

Sat Mar 5 00:00:00 2011

March 5, 2011, 2:30-5:30pm

For this exhibit, artists were asked to paint the same scene by day and by night in order to explore the differences in perception which are shaped by light or its absence.

Is a night scene simply the same scene by day without the clarity of light? In fact, it is not. Light brings out detail, a sense of familiarity and ease. Darkness strips away the detail but also brings a different clarity, of form and shape and contrast, an emotional quality of engaging in something not quite known or knowable.

Some of us are people of the night, able to wait patiently for perception to adjust and penetrate the dark, able to establish a relationship with the night.

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

'as different as' night and day 160 'as different as' night and day

FIERCE ABSOLUTION

Sat Nov 27 00:00:00 2010

Saturday, Nov. 27, 2010

For the last several years at this time, Gallery Arcturus has featured artistic interpretations of angels. Each show has explored a different quality; mercy, single intent, reconciliation -- themes that have followed humans through many ages and cultures. Depictions of angels or spirits in art and theatre can be used to illustrate such qualities – and to invite us to open up to that which is mysterious or even miraculous.

 

The exploration this season is the sense of being powerfully gazed upon, being deeply seen and then scoured clean until nothing remains.

 

-- --

Previous shows of Angels:

 

2009     from the roof of the world

http://www.arcturus.ca/artists/group/roof/roof.html

 

2008      I N T E R C E S S I O N:  reconciling  between  the  worlds

http://www.arcturus.ca/artists/group/Intercession/intercessiondescription.html

 

2007     b e i n g s   of   i n t e n tangelic forms among us

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?g=1&s=2008-11-29-i-n-t-e-r-c-e-s-s-i-o-nreconciling-between-the-worlds

 

2006      gestures of mercy

http://www.arcturus.ca/artists/group/Mercy/mercydescription.html

 

-- --

“Love shot from their faces like barbed lightning. It was so unlike the love we experience that its expression could easily be mistaken for ferocity.” C.S. Lewis, Perelandra

Exhibition, Group Show

FIERCE ABSOLUTION 270 FIERCE ABSOLUTION

the other side

Tue Sep 14 00:00:00 2010

Exhibition

the other side 160 the other side deborah harris Della Heywood

Della Heywood

Tue Jun 14 00:00:00 2011

http://dellaheywood.com/?page_id=19                  From 1997:

Born in Vancouver, Della’s primary interest from early childhood was art.  She attended the Emily Carr School of Art and Capilano College where she studied a variety of artistic mediums.  In her development as an artist, Della was influenced by the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and the Surrealists.  This is revealed in her love of light, intensity of colour and appreciation for dream-like realities.  Her paintings document her quest to strip away habitual cognition and enter into the magical world behind and within ordinary perception.  Della currently lives in California and has become one of the most accomplished members of the School of Reductionism.

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

Artist

Della Heywood Della Heywood

a tension of colour - alchemical meetings

Sat Jun 12 00:00:00 2010

Saturday, July 10, 2010, 2:30-5:30pm

Toronto: The current show at Gallery Arcturus, “a tension of colour”, features works on canvas as well as mixed media including weathered, oxidized metal.

A unique aspect of this gallery is the collaborative process that occurs during group shows. Artists not only create their pieces inside the gallery space, they can refer to and be inspired by each other’s work.

The reception takes place this Saturday, although the show officially began June 12. As pieces become ready, artist-in-residence Deborah Harris has been deciding on their placement – and the locations have shifted as the installation evolved.

The theme for “a tension of colour” developed from a visit Harris made with artist Heather Valencia to St. Michael’s cathedral in downtown Toronto. A fresco on one of its walls is an immense field of turquoise, overlaid with finely detailed images of almost imperceptable copper-orange. Harris says the sensation of beholding this flood of colour inspired the exploration undertaken by the group.

While most pieces appear to experiment with two predominant hues, Harris points out, “One way of achieving luminosity in a painting is the blending of many, many colours -- it takes so many colours to give it life.” This luminous quality requires the use of certain combinations, hence the show’s subtitle “alchemical meetings”.

Visitors may wish to spend time with individual pieces or instead consider the effect of the entire collection. And instead of simply looking, why not ask yourself how it feels, physically, to observe the mix of colours – including when they seem to collide or oppose each other.

Contributing artists: Sunjye, Eron Boyd, Heather Valencia, Vivian Felsen, Deborah Harris & Maya Rain

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

Toronto: The current show at Gallery Arcturus, “a tension of colour”, features works on canvas as well as mixed media including weathered, oxidized metal.

A unique aspect of this gallery is the collaborative process that occurs during group shows. Artists not only create their pieces inside the gallery space, they can refer to and be inspired by each other’s work.

The reception takes place this Saturday, although the show officially began June 12. As pieces become ready, artist-in-residence Deborah Harris has been deciding on their placement – and the locations have shifted as the installation evolved.

The theme for “a tension of colour” developed from a visit Harris made with artist Heather Valencia to St. Michael’s cathedral in downtown Toronto. A fresco on one of its walls is an immense field of turquoise, overlaid with finely detailed images of almost imperceptable copper-orange. Harris says the sensation of beholding this flood of colour inspired the exploration undertaken by the group.

While most pieces appear to experiment with two predominant hues, Harris points out, “One way of achieving luminosity in a painting is the blending of many, many colours -- it takes so many colours to give it life.” This luminous quality requires the use of certain combinations, hence the show’s subtitle “alchemical meetings”.

Visitors may wish to spend time with individual pieces or instead consider the effect of the entire collection. And instead of simply looking, why not ask yourself how it feels, physically, to observe the mix of colours – including when they seem to collide or oppose each other.

Contributing artists: Sunjye, Eron Boyd, Heather Valencia, Vivian Felsen, Deborah Harris & Maya Rain

a tension of colour - alchemical meetings 160 a tension of colour - alchemical meetings

planted - the sensation of being grounded

Wed Apr 14 00:00:00 2010

Saturday, May 15, 2010, 2:30-5:30pm

worms spit

bubbles of earth

between blades of grass

they are turning shadows

inside out

 

 

 The current exhibit “planted” is a composition of objects and artwork placed precisely within the gallery space, allowing the viewer to experience a sense of groundedness. The pull of one’s body in response to an artistic creation (work of art) can be surprising, and informative (surprisingly evidential).

 Artist-in-residence deborah harris says the show is about “exploring the sensations of being grounded. I think the installation itself creates an environment which helps to feel that.”

 The arrangement of the objects –some of which are weathered after being outside in the earth -– also acts to bring the gallery floors and walls vividly into the experience. Reflections of images and light on these surfaces play a part in the exhibit.

  Says Harris, “I would say there’s a real gravity in all of the objects here. Their placement is intended to draw the attention down. In a way, the attention itself becomes planted.”

Exhibition

planted - the sensation of being grounded 160 planted - the sensation of being grounded deborah harris Camie Geary-Martin

betwixt and between - an exploration of boundaries and lines of sight

Wed Feb 3 00:00:00 2010

Saturday, February 27, 2010, 2:30-5:30pm

 

Betwixt and Between

this or that  /  that or this   …

an exploration of boundaries    and lines of sight

Gallery Arcturus’ latest show is see-as-we-go, a mixed media installation-in-progress that can be experienced in multiple visits. The curating of the exhibit may continue for several weeks, becoming complete just before the “opening” reception on February 27.

New works of collage, paint or mixed media continue to be placed, moved and even taken down in a process that visitors are invited to witness over the duration of the show to March 20. Artists are still in the act of creating – some potential contributions may not even exist yet.

Currently displayed are collages by Vivian Felsen as well as a photographic series by Jamie LaTrobe.  Some pieces from the previous show have been kept for this one – including sculptures by Chris Dolan and Camie Geary-Martin.

As if entering a performance space from backstage, don’t be surprised to see a ladder in the gallery, as if hinting the show is still in preparation. Yet it is ready for viewing now …

New and old works may be placed in, on, or around easels, tables, pedestals, ladders ... and occasionally, a wall.

Expect to find picture frames, some empty, hanging mid-air or lashed to a support column.  The frames may contain works of art or be the art itself. Who determines this?

The effect can give rise to questions about what is permanent or temporary, about public presentation and behind-the-scenes preparation, about rough and refined.

The mountings and the placement of the work may weaken preconceptions of how art must be viewed, as well as the viewer’s role.

Is the person perceiving a creative work simply an invisible observer or does their physical proximity matter as much as any other object in the gallery space? By playing with the line between beholder and beheld perhaps the artist, curator and viewer can become more connected…

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

betwixt and between - an exploration of boundaries and lines of sight 160 betwixt and between - an exploration of boundaries and lines of sight

from the roof of the world

Sat Dec 12 00:00:00 2009

Saturday, December 12, 2009, 2:30 - 5:30pm

From the roof of the world angels descend
In a beam of light which falls upon
The artist's canvas, the poet's page,
A quality revealed, a blessing received.


Anonymous

 

 "Angelic works" have been placed throughout a series of exhibit spaces over two floors of this public art gallery. Art from the permanent collection is on display including sculptures of metal and wood, as well as mixed media and paintings. Visitors entering the gallery building are presented with striking installations that connect to a new work in oil on canvas by deborah harris, Gallery Arcturus' Artist-In-Dialogue.



 The show offers viewers an opportunity to explore the sources of creativity and expression and to inquire about the role of angels in present-day life. Standard images of winged beings are common, particularly in this holiday season, but what do they mean to us?

 

The current show intentionally mixes media: Sculptures from the permanent collection and an array of other objects are placed in direct relation to paintings on canvas (and wood), or sit in open gallery space. Through a continuing exploration of angels and what angelic influence might mean in this diverse and fragmented culture, artist-in-residence deborah harris has also created a new painting inspired by a collage work she completed a decade previously.

 

At a time when the days are again lengthening, take the opportunity to contemplate the sculptures of Chris Dolan, Camie Geary-Martin, Roger Chow and Adrian Symonds. Moving through the gallery spaces find work by E.J. Gold in acrylic on canvas such as “View from the Top of the World” and “On A Clear Day You Can See All Where and All When”.

Exhibition, Group Show

from the roof of the world 320 from the roof of the world

FIRST PRINCIPLES: ORBS AND ARROWS

Sat Oct 24 00:00:00 2009

 

Michael Poulton
Biography

Michael Poulton is a multimedia and installation artist and the founder and director of the Museum of Temporary Art.


Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, his award winning work has been exhibited internationally, with twenty solo exhibitions and work in several major public collections and received the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. His art work has been published in The Sciences, the Journal of the New York Academy of Science and many other books and magazines in Canada and the United States. He has also collaborated on architectural glass projects in Canada and Wales, and designed posters, catalogues and other art related publications, for which he also received awards, and been a juror for the Ontario Arts Council's Design Arts Awards. He is past Chair of Artspace, Peterborough, an artists run centre and still actively involved on the board. His art training was in England at the Epsom and Ewell School of Art and the Camberwell School of Art, London.

 

Gallery Arcturus Curator’s Comments October 16, 2009

In my perception, Michael Poulton’s work is not separate from the space that it inhabits. His enquiry is given shape and direction as it emerges on the walls of the Museum of Temporary Art, of which he is the founder and custodian. This museum/gallery is a repository of interesting objects connected with literature, art and science, a cabinet of curiosities which, in his most recent work, Michael has incorporated into collage and sculptural assemblages. The gallery is also home to decades of drawings and paintings, impressions from journeys taken, down the road a mile or to far off lands. This is the place where he has lived and worked for the better part of his life, it is the place he returns to, distilling those findings into works of art.

An artist tries to make sense of what he sees and to make it visible to others. In this body of work Michael uses the symbol of arrow to draw our attention to the sense of direction that is present in each moment.

Every movement has a direction it is moving towards. We turn to look at something and our gaze is shaped by its direction. In the process of building we start from the bottom and move up, the building itself has a direction. Doorways and windows form the possibility of moving out or into a space. In this body of work Michael has used the arrow to draw our attention to the direction of the gesture evoked in these images. The other part of this work being exhibited is represented by the orb. Wherein the arrow lacks the target that it seeks and is therefore incomplete and dynamic, the orb is self-sufficient, self-originating and represents completion. They are the perfect counterpoint for each other.

deborah harris

FIRST PRINCIPLES: ORBS AND ARROWS  

painted arrows and spherical assemblages
exploring the nature of paradox through symbolism
... whatever that might mean

A show of mixed media by Michael Poulton
of the Museum of Temporary Art

October 24 - November 28, 2009
Opening Reception: Saturday October 24th, 2:30-5:30pm

Michael Poulton
Biography

Michael Poulton is a multimedia and installation artist and the founder and director of the Museum of Temporary Art.

Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, his award winning work has been exhibited internationally, with twenty solo exhibitions and work in several major public collections and received the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

His art work has been published in The Sciences, the Journal of the New York Academy of Science and many other books and magazines in Canada and the United States. He has also collaborated on architectural glass projects in Canada and Wales, and designed posters, catalogues and other art related publications, for which he also received awards, and been a juror for the Ontario Arts Council's Design Arts Awards.

He is past Chair of Artspace, Peterborough, an artists run centre and still actively involved on the board. His art training was in England at the Epsom and Ewell School of Art and the Camberwell School of Art, London.

Gallery Arcturus Curator’s Comments October 16, 2009

In my perception, Michael Poulton’s work is not separate from the space that it inhabits. His enquiry is given shape and direction as it emerges on the walls of the Museum of Temporary Art, of which he is the founder and custodian. This museum/gallery is a repository of interesting objects connected with literature, art and science, a cabinet of curiosities which, in his most recent work, Michael has incorporated into collage and sculptural assemblages.

The gallery is also home to decades of drawings and paintings, impressions from journeys taken, down the road a mile or to far off lands. This is the place where he has lived and worked for the better part of his life, it is the place he returns to, distilling those findings into works of art.

An artist tries to make sense of what he sees and to make it visible to others. In this body of work Michael uses the symbol of arrow to draw our attention to the sense of direction that is present in each moment.

Every movement has a direction it is moving towards. We turn to look at something and our gaze is shaped by its direction. In the process of building we start from the bottom and move up, the building itself has a direction. Doorways and windows form the possibility of moving out or into a space. In this body of work Michael has used the arrow to draw our attention to the direction of the gesture evoked in these images.

The other part of this work being exhibited is represented by the orb. Wherein the arrow lacks the target that it seeks for and is therefore incomplete and dynamic, the orb is selfsufficient, self-originating and represents completion. They are the perfect counterpoint for each other.

deborah harris

More on ‘First Principles’:

Bright red arrows arrest the eye, drawing the viewer into a landscape of antiquarian manuscripts, maps and pages from out-of-print encyclopedias. Poulton’s arrows precisely and meticulously point us to something he wants us to see; a gesture, a detail or the arrow itself. Within this play of movement are the orbs, embodying a presence of stillness. The two archetypes create a dynamic whole.

“I’m trying to find the essence of things,” says Poulton, “stripping things back to the very basic sort of concepts of what constitutes reality.” He asks, “What are the building blocks of the world that we inhabit?” This show offers the opportunity to inquire into how the symbols of arrow and sphere, representing the principles of moving and being at rest, are essential to human experience.

Poulton says, “What makes a work of art a living thing is, to some degree, ambiguity. What I want a work to do is intrigue somebody, to make them wonder.”

Exhibition

FIRST PRINCIPLES: ORBS AND ARROWS  

painted arrows and spherical assemblages
exploring the nature of paradox through symbolism
... whatever that might mean

A show of mixed media by Michael Poulton
of the Museum of Temporary Art

October 24 - November 28, 2009
Opening Reception: Saturday October 24th, 2:30-5:30pm

Michael Poulton
Biography

Michael Poulton is a multimedia and installation artist and the founder and director of the Museum of Temporary Art.

Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, his award winning work has been exhibited internationally, with twenty solo exhibitions and work in several major public collections and received the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

His art work has been published in The Sciences, the Journal of the New York Academy of Science and many other books and magazines in Canada and the United States. He has also collaborated on architectural glass projects in Canada and Wales, and designed posters, catalogues and other art related publications, for which he also received awards, and been a juror for the Ontario Arts Council's Design Arts Awards.

He is past Chair of Artspace, Peterborough, an artists run centre and still actively involved on the board. His art training was in England at the Epsom and Ewell School of Art and the Camberwell School of Art, London.

Gallery Arcturus Curator’s Comments October 16, 2009

In my perception, Michael Poulton’s work is not separate from the space that it inhabits. His enquiry is given shape and direction as it emerges on the walls of the Museum of Temporary Art, of which he is the founder and custodian. This museum/gallery is a repository of interesting objects connected with literature, art and science, a cabinet of curiosities which, in his most recent work, Michael has incorporated into collage and sculptural assemblages.

The gallery is also home to decades of drawings and paintings, impressions from journeys taken, down the road a mile or to far off lands. This is the place where he has lived and worked for the better part of his life, it is the place he returns to, distilling those findings into works of art.

An artist tries to make sense of what he sees and to make it visible to others. In this body of work Michael uses the symbol of arrow to draw our attention to the sense of direction that is present in each moment.

Every movement has a direction it is moving towards. We turn to look at something and our gaze is shaped by its direction. In the process of building we start from the bottom and move up, the building itself has a direction. Doorways and windows form the possibility of moving out or into a space. In this body of work Michael has used the arrow to draw our attention to the direction of the gesture evoked in these images.

The other part of this work being exhibited is represented by the orb. Wherein the arrow lacks the target that it seeks for and is therefore incomplete and dynamic, the orb is selfsufficient, self-originating and represents completion. They are the perfect counterpoint for each other.

deborah harris

More on ‘First Principles’:

Bright red arrows arrest the eye, drawing the viewer into a landscape of antiquarian manuscripts, maps and pages from out-of-print encyclopedias. Poulton’s arrows precisely and meticulously point us to something he wants us to see; a gesture, a detail or the arrow itself. Within this play of movement are the orbs, embodying a presence of stillness. The two archetypes create a dynamic whole.

“I’m trying to find the essence of things,” says Poulton, “stripping things back to the very basic sort of concepts of what constitutes reality.” He asks, “What are the building blocks of the world that we inhabit?” This show offers the opportunity to inquire into how the symbols of arrow and sphere, representing the principles of moving and being at rest, are essential to human experience.

Poulton says, “What makes a work of art a living thing is, to some degree, ambiguity. What I want a work to do is intrigue somebody, to make them wonder.”

FIRST PRINCIPLES: ORBS AND ARROWS 320 FIRST PRINCIPLES: ORBS AND ARROWS Michael Poulton

Collage Workshop

Sun Jun 26 14:00:00 2011

Collage Workshop Collage Workshop

SENTINELS in a field of attention... standing

Wed Jul 1 00:00:00 2009

Saturday September 26, 2009, 2:30-5:30pm

Participating artists:

Vivian Felsen, Luke Gilliam, Maya Boyd, Camie Geary-Martin, Eric Jackson, Eron Boyd, deborah harris

Sound collage by Gilles Goyotte

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

SENTINELS   in a field of attention... standing 320 SENTINELS   in a field of attention... standing

Passage of Time: The Architecture of Change

Tue Sep 8 12:00:00 2015

Saturday September 26, 2015 2 - 5 p.m.

A selection of collages by students at Boston Architectural College will be on display in the second-floor Collage Gallery through October.

--

Chip Piatti, Boston Architectural College instructor extraordinaire, has been teaching a course entitled Roadside Collage for many years. This class brings together Chip's love of and deep expertise about the automobile and the architecture and infrastructure that emerged to meet the car in America. He asks the students to use collage as a medium to explore their frequently unquestioned view of the world as seen through the windshield and to consider how this significant view of architecture and landscape has shaped them.

Gathering collages from three semesters of student work, Chip has provided the mixed media panels for a curated exhibit that is being shown in the Collage Gallery at Gallery Arcturus. As part of this exhibit, a short video has been created that intersperses footage of driving experiences from the past with student collages. See on YouTube or here

A reception was held on September 26th, when Professor Piatti spoke about the work.

--

How do we recognize the passage of time?

 

Architecture reflects the needs and trends of people within a particular time frame. As these specifics change, so too the construction of new and renovation of existing structures adapt.  Commerce, industry, skills of labour force, transportation, relationship to authority, age of population, immigration are some of the factors woven into the design and function. Observing architecture with an inquiring mind enables us to learn something of the people who lived in and moved through those structures.

 

Collage is a medium which lends itself to this inquiry. Photographs saved from different times can be found, fragmented and reassembled to document the contrasting influences over time. The pieces in this show are examples of this process, seen from the viewpoint of a driver looking through the windshield. Each is a work of artistic merit in its own right.

          - Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence deborah harris

--

Brief course description: The North American roadside is a widescreen movie, viewed through the windshield of a speeding automobile. The collages in this exhibit chronicle the development of roadside architecture and features which reflect and engage passing motorists and their vehicles. The assignments:

Direction

Collage views, through a car’s windshield, of a roadway with a definite direction and implied destination, to a horizon. The road’s surface should be discernible, and the automobile’s speed should be visible on the instrument panel. There also must be at least one indication of human presence in the landscape or roadside. At least one element of the collage must be in the artist’s own hand.

 

Age of Brass

From the driver’s seat of a pre-1915 motor car, create a roadside scene which includes at least one business appropriate to the time. Pay particular attention to the form and nature of windscreens, controls and instruments available up to the year of the chosen vehicle. Requirements of perspective, visible road surface and artist’s hand still apply; and please limit architecture to one side of the road.

 

Fill ‘Er Up!

In a collage which evokes the pre-war twentieth-century roadside, create a collage which demonstrates the evolution of two of the three gasoline service station precedents. Be certain to include the development of gasoline pumps as well as forms, silhouettes and cladding materials, especially as these details reflect the elements of automotive design.

 

Style, Function and Identity

Combine a selection of particularly roadside building materials with decidedly post-war automotive images to chronicle the progress of gasoline station design, through the second half of the twentieth century. Be careful to display at least 3 different building styles as well as gas pumps, company identification and elements of designer contributions.

 

Food on the Road

Trace the origins of manufactured restaurants from the very earliest lunch wagons to the work of the major pre-war diner builders. Pay particular attention to the changes in forms and massing, especially in roofs, surface materials and fenestration.

 

Diner interior

In a view from the outside through a window, picture a diner’s interior, with the traditional counter, cooking space, booths and, of course, food ready to be served. At least three different diner materials should be used on various surfaces. Please include at least one server behind the counter and patrons seated at both the counter and booth seats.

 

Nexus

Every major cross-country highway was punctuated by nodes, formed by local thoroughfares as they guided motorists into the highway system. A collage rendering of one such highway nexus will include several well-marked local roads, as well as a collection of businesses for the care of travelers and their vehicles as they begin their journeys. Filling stations, diners, tire and body shops and perhaps a motel or two would be regular features of such a place.

 

Evolution of Lodging

In a collage view which represents the time frame of the events, please document the development of roadside lodging, either from camping to cabins or cottages to motels. Take care that road surface, automotive details and ambient light all are appropriate to the era visible through the windshield.

 

Surreal Speed

Please incorporate a chosen fragment of an automobile into a surreal collage which communicates the effects of high-speed motoring. Although the elements of the car and the rest of the composition need not be in conventional spatial relationships, the images each should maintain a recognizable perspective.

 

Day Light

Explore the ways in which light colors the roadside view, during the day. In a collage which includes at least one permanent construction, such as a bridge or tunnel, at least one other vehicle and a change in direction, depict the effects of at least four different aspects or sources of light and its effects on the scene.

 

Light at Night

Nightfall changes the cityscape enough to make it a different place than it is in daylight. In a collage which displays at least five different sources of types of illumination, communicate the experience of motoring at night. Please include at least two examples of iconic roadside architecture, human figures in differing scales and information rendered in both reflected and direct images.

 

Change Over Time

Featuring at least two roadside structures as they change through time, this collage will reflect the evolution of automotive design as well as attitudes towards the changes and their effects on drivers and other personalities. The work should employ several elements of change as well as the effects these forces have on building form, use and materials.

collage

Exhibition

Passage of Time: The Architecture of Change 320 Passage of Time: The Architecture of Change Road Trip lonmkOCCkM4 exhibit architecture of change -- a study in time iqEgtaFyYAA exhibit

A PLAY OF LIGHT IN FOUR PARTS

Sat May 2 00:00:00 2009

May 9, 2009 2:00 - 5:00pm

WORKSHOP IN TWO PARTS  given in the gallery by Sim Posen

Saturday May 9, 2009   2:00 - 5:00pm

PART I 
A description of the cameras, films, exposures and developing techniques used to capture images depicted in this exhibition.

PART II
"My photographs represent a journey in search of the beautiful. This pursuit is increasingly dismissed by the current art world. In this workshop, I pose the question: 'Is the search for beauty relevant?'"

Exhibition

A PLAY OF LIGHT   IN FOUR PARTS 160 A PLAY OF LIGHT   IN FOUR PARTS Simeon Posen

Simeon Posen

Thu Jun 24 00:00:00 2010

Born and raised in Toronto, Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with works spanning over four decades. His studies in architecture and stage design contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs – namely, illuminating the intricacies of the parts to express the structure of the whole, whether created by nature or by man.


Posen’s technique, style and composition are also influenced by such photographers as Marie Cosindas, Wynn Bullock and Brett Weston and Ansel Adams with whom he studied in California.

Receiving both federal and provincial grants, Posen has conducted extensive photographic studies of the architecture of France, Austria, Iran and Greece; as well as broadly documenting the Ontario landscape.

Today, Posen continues his exploration of photographic art through blending new and old technology, frequently exhibiting while continuing his professional career in architecture.

 

Photographic Techniques

Posen utilizes 8x10 and mid-size negative formats to express the beauty of natural form. He prefers the subtlety of ‘black and white’, maximizing the use of digital technology interwoven with more traditional methods. He uses ‘Pyro’ for negative development, a formula favoured by Adams and Weston, and continues to print on silver fibre-based papers.

Simeon Posen brings an added dimension of brilliance to his works by carefully selecting the conditions of light and weather for the subject chosen. His exposures can require up to 30 minutes. This study and patience bring an intensity yet subtlety to his nature studies.

 

http://www.simeonposen.com/

Artist

Simeon Posen Simeon Posen

For the Birds

Tue Feb 3 00:00:00 2009

Saturday March 28, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

For the Birds 200 For the Birds

I N T E R C E S S I O N...reconciling between the worlds

Sat Nov 29 00:00:00 2008

Saturday November 29, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Exhibition, Group Show

I N T E R C E S S I O N...reconciling  between  the  worlds 320 I N T E R C E S S I O N...reconciling  between  the  worlds

Submerged... LIFE BENEATH THE SURFACE

Sat Oct 18 00:00:00 2008

Exhibition, Group Show

Submerged... LIFE BENEATH THE SURFACE 200 Submerged... LIFE BENEATH THE SURFACE

dead reckoning

Mon Jul 7 00:00:00 2008

Saturday September 27, 2008, 2:30-5:30pm

“Wither goest thou and what is thy heading?”

“Heedful of the signs, the body as compass,

tracing the course from its beginning,

we are finding our way dead reckoning.”

                                                  Anonymous

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

dead reckoning 320 dead reckoning

Meetings... beyond memory and history (main gallery)

Sat May 3 00:00:00 2008

Saturday May 3, 2008, 2:30-5:30pm

 

Biographies

Ayokah

arcturus.ca

Ayokah began photography at a fairly young age and has continued to be interested in using the camera’s unique perspective to frame an image in an isolated form. She has the ability to view a subject and see how it will translate onto a one dimensional photographic plane, playing with depth of field and focus to enhance a detail which may otherwise be invisible to the human eye. Ayokah’s love for the camera lens view drew her to study Creative Photography at Humber College in Toronto where she received her diploma in 2003. She uses the camera as a medium to learn, to change and to grow by looking to see the ordinary in an unordinary way.


 

Aaron Ansarov

www.ansarov.com

Aaron creates images with impact and emotion. He has a masterful use of light, color and an ability to push the envelope. Using insight to the subjects’ apprehension, he breaks down barriers and creates imagery to be remembered. His up close and personal style allows him to create captivating, beautiful and original images. Aaron has traveled the world as military photojournalist for more than 14 years and has experienced life through the interactions of many cultures in peacetime and in war. Aaron has been recognized for many years as one of the most award-winning photographers in Department of Defence history. He has been published in magazines, newspapers and books globally.


 

David Bean

No biography available for David Bean.


 

Marie Fournier

arcturus.ca

Marie has been engaged with photography since 1986. She has had exhibits in California, where she resided for time and in Montreal, her hometown. Prior to that she received her BA in social psychology, studied art history and was, for four years, involved with Montreal’s Museum of Fine Art. She has also worked in advertising and learned the skills of graphic designer. In the beginning she explored black and white imaging. Later as an autodidact she experimented in the darkroom. Now she combines colours easily and constructs views with Photoshop, etc. Marie is currently working to come to an understanding of ‘what is perception’. She is creating a photo-book focusing on this subject, exploring different perception, comparing and questioning – can who I am be discovered through what I can see?


 

Sheila Goldgrab

Morocco calls out to the heart. The country is a land of great diversity of landscapes and of people, and making portraits required humility and at times audacity. These individuals overwhelmed me with their generosity of allowing me to photograph them. An intriguing aspect of these encounters was the relative lack of timidity on the part of many, especially on the part of those least experienced as subjects. It was Arthur Clark who said that, “All explorers are seeking something they have lost.” I believe there is truth to that. The old world permeates through its transition into modernity, and I love it for that. You can see it clearly on these faces which I sought out.


 

Paddy Jane

No biography available for Paddy Jane.


 

Jamie Latrobe

dragonwhistle.ca

No biography available for Jamie Latrobe.


 

Miriana Mitrovitch

“Photography for me is a combination of movement, music, poetry and light. It is like sculpting a moment in time...”


 

Joachim Oepkes

arcturus.ca

Joachim Oepkes is a communications and art professor at Sheridan College who has shown his slide installations and photo exhibitions in a variety of venues in Toronto.


 

Simeon Posen

www.simeonposen.com

Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with work spanning more than four decades. His studies in architecture and stage design contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs. Specifically, he illuminates the intricate parts expressing the structure of the whole, whether created by nature or by man. Posen’s technique, style and composition are influenced by photographers such as Marie Consindas, Wynn Bullock, Brett Weston and Ansel Adams with whom he studied in California. Receiving both federal and provincial grants, Posen has conducted extensive photographic studies of the architecture of France, Austria, Iran and Greece, as well as broadly documenting the Ontario landscapes and vistas across Canada.


 

Shozo Ushiroguchi

No biography available for Shozo Ushiroguchi.


 

James Gary Stark

Gary Stark is a contemporary artist and photographer. He worked as an industrial designer from 1967-2000 with a focus on exhibitions, interiors, furniture and corporate graphics. He worked with the Canadian Exhibition Commission in Ottawa on numerous projects beginning with Expo 67 and later formed Stark & Associates which was based in Toronto. Gary has taught courses in art and design at OCAD, Ryerson University and Georgian College. He has shown his work in over 25 solo and group shows. Gary is currently working with mixed media and images on canvas and plexiglass. His studio is located on top of Blue Mountain, Collingwood.


 

Daniel Volkovich

No biography available for Daniel Volkovich.

Exhibition, Group Show

Meetings... beyond memory and history (main gallery) 160 Meetings... beyond memory and history (main gallery)

Meetings... beyond memory and history (upper gallery)

Sat May 3 00:00:00 2008

Saturday May 3, 2008, 2:30-5:30pm

 

Biographies

Adriana Capozzi

At the age of six, Adriana Capozzi made a pinhole camera and has been in love with photography ever since. Whether it be for still or motion pictures, she loves to observe the world from (and hide) behind the lens.


 

Ed Drass

eddrass.com

No biography available for Ed Drass.


 

Janos Gardonyi

www.artmajeur.com/janosgardonyi

Janos Gardonyi B.Arch.(Hons) OAA(Ret.) MRAIC is a retired Architect and Photographer of Hungarian origin. He came to Canada in 1957 and completed his education at the University of Toronto. He had been the Chief Architect of Orlando Corporation and has been responsible for the design and execution of many high rise office towers, shopping plazas, commercial and industrial developments. Upon retirement he turned to artistic photography and exhibited extensively in art galleries and restaurants in Toronto. His subjects include landscapes, townscapes, architectural and historical photography and many images collected during his extensive foreign travels. He also creates digital artwork and abstract images.


 

Sheila Goldgrab

www.leadership-gold.com

Morocco calls out to the heart. The country is a land of great diversity of landscapes and of people, and making portraits required humility and at times audacity. These individuals overwhelmed me with their generosity of allowing me to photograph them. An intriguing aspect of these encounters was the relative lack of timidity on the part of many, especially on the part of those least experienced as subjects. It was Arthur Clark who said that, “All explorers are seeking something they have lost.” I believe there is truth to that. The old world permeates through its transition into modernity, and I love it for that. You can see it clearly on these faces which I sought out.


 

Shirley Grosser

Shirley Grosser was born in northern Manitoba, and now makes her home in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The image is one of a series of water reflections belonging to a body of work seeking to notice “what ELSE is there”. The social isolation of her birthplace, and the gift of its visual vastness, bring focus to her imagination. Her current photography project is a collection of portraits of women who made contributions to ‘the war effort’ during WWII.


 

Lenka Holubec

photosharedvisions.com        arcturus.ca

Born in the Czech Republic, Lenka Holubec studied at the Film and Video Department of York University in Toronto. She worked as an independent filmmaker developing feature and documentary project. Since, still photography always held a strong appeal to her as a tool of powerful visual expression, she has increasingly devoted herself to this field. A strong bond with nature inspires and nourishes her photography work to a great extent. Photographing the various elements of nature continues to be a very intense and revealing experience as it involves a process of achieving a unity and harmony between the surrounding environment and her. The images then echo her pursuit to capture and preserve a meaning of this experience.


 

Wallace Immen

theglobeandmail.com/authors/wallace-immen

Wallace Immen is a noted journalist who lives in Cabbagetown. “I’ve always been fascinated by visual puns. My photographs are urban landscapes in which momentary relationships eloquently suggest a larger and more complex story.”

Exhibition, Group Show

Meetings... beyond memory and history (upper gallery) 160 Meetings... beyond memory and history (upper gallery)

see through... what is in visible

Sat Feb 2 00:00:00 2008

Saturday March 29, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Glass objects are placed in the gallery

in relationship to sculptural forms.

The space becomes a three dimensional collage

of glass, light, form and reflection.

 

Participating artists respond on canvas and paper

to what is seen.

Enter the gallery to observe and see through their eyes.

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

see through... what is in visible 110 see through... what is in visible

Beings of Intent... angelic forms among us

Sat Dec 1 00:00:00 2007

Saturday December 1, 2007, 2:30-5:30pm

The visitants were here not because they were at rest
but because they glanced and wheeled through the
packed reality of Heaven (which men called empty space),
to keep their beams upon this spot of the moving Earth's hide.

C.S. Lewis, That Hideous Strength - The Descent of the Gods

Exhibition, Group Show

Beings of Intent... angelic forms among us 320 Beings of Intent... angelic forms among us

Form Space Perspective

Mon Oct 1 00:00:00 2007

Saturday October 13, 2007, 2:00-5:30pm

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

Form Space Perspective 200 Form Space Perspective

OUT OF THIS WORLD.. seeing the ordinary in an unordinary way

Sat Apr 28 00:00:00 2007

Saturday April 28, 2007, 2:30-5:30pm

 

Biographies

Ayokah

arcturus.ca

Ayokah began photography at a fairly young age and has continued to be interested in using the camera’s unique perspective to frame an image in an isolated form. She has the ability to view a subject and see how it will translate onto a one dimensional photographic plane, playing with depth of field and focus to enhance a detail which may otherwise be invisible to the human eye. Ayokah’s love for the camera lens view drew her to study Creative Photography at Humber College in Toronto where she received her diploma in 2000. She uses the camera as a medium to learn, to change and to grow by looking to see the ordinary in an unordinary way.


 

Lynette Browne

Several years ago, Lynnette Browne resolved to study photography and art as her life's work. Two successful exhibitions revealed her emerging artistic voice; “Imprints”, a black and white pond study, challenged the interpretation of beauty by pulling the viewer into the abstract darkness of a world beneath the pond, and “Elements at Work”, a series of colour photographs, invited the viewer to consider their perception of the ordinary as they contemplated objects as abstracted fragments. Lynnette photographs using negative film and prints her own work in a darkroom using traditional printing processes. She loves the feel of the paper, the efforts to control the chemicals and a creativity that, for her, begins before the click of the shutter and is only completed in the darkroom. For her the visual and the tactile are a significant part of her creativity.


 

Ed Drass

eddrass.com

Ed Drass has had some photos published as part of newspaper articles. He has not exhibited photo images before.


 

Marie Fournier

Marie has been engaged with photography since 1986. She has had exhibits in California, where she resided for a time and in Montreal, her hometown. Prior to that she received her BA in social psychology, studied art history and was, for four years, involved with Montreal’s Museum of Fine Art. She has also worked in advertising and learned the skills of graphic designer. In the beginning she explored black and white imaging. Later as an autodidact she experimented in the darkroom. Now she combines colours easily and constructs views with Photoshop, etc. Marie is currently working to come to an understanding of ‘what is perception’. She is creating a photo-book focusing on this subject, exploring different perceptions, comparing and questioning — can who I am be discovered through what I see?


 

Janos Gardonyi

artmajeur.com/janosgardonyi

Janos Gardonyi B.Arch.(Hons) OAA(Ret.) MRAIC is a retired Architect and Photographer of Hungarian origin. He came to Canada in 1957 and completed his education at the University of Toronto. He had been the Chief Artchitect of Orlando Corporation and has been responsible for the design and execution of many high rise office towers, shopping plazas, commercial and industrial developments. Upon retirement he turned to artistic photography and exhibited extensively in art galleries and restaurants in Toronto. His subjects include landscapes, townscapes, architectural and historical photography and many images collected during his extensive foreign travels. He also creates digital artwork and abstract images.


 

Marni Grossman

marnigrossman.com

A leading photographer in film and tv, Toronto born Marni Grossman has spent much of her life looking through a lens. Marni strives in her work to reflect the essence and nature of her subjects. She is drawn to colour, light, texture and to the impact of the elements on the landscape. Marni has documented the grizzly bear in the BC Khutzemateen Sanctuary and the White Spirit Bear in the Queen Charlotte Islands. She has travelled extensively throughout the western United States and in the northern lake districts of Ontario. Her images from the Senegal region of Africa are a celebration of the people and their life. The still photographic work of Marni Grossman is currently exhibited and sold under the name of Soulscape Inc. website noted above.


 

Kelly Holinshead

kellytheshutterbug.com

Kelly Holinshead is a professional photographer working and living in Muskoka. She operates her busy commercial photography business from her fine art gallery located on Huntsville’s Main Street, where her unique landscape images are permanently displayed. By implementing various photographic techniques, Kelly continually offers her viewers extraordinary views of ordinary scenes, without the use of digital applications.


 

Lenka Holubec

photosharedvisions.com

Born in the Czech Republic, Lenka Holubec studied at the Film and Video Department of York University in Toronto. She worked as an independent filmmaker developing feature and documentary projects. Since still photography always held a strong appeal to her as a tool of powerful visual expression, she has increasingly devoted herself to this field. A strong bond with nature inspires and nourishes her photography work to a great extent. Photographing the various elements of nature continues to be a very intense and revealing experience as it involves a process of achieving a unity and harmony between the surrounding environment and her. The images then echo her pursuit to capture and preserve a meaning of this experience.


 

Joseph Kary

I am a lawyer by profession, and sometimes use photography as a tool of the trade, to create demonstrative evidence in court hearings. My writing, on subjects ranging from contemporary libel law to the anthropology of biblical contracts, has been published in a number of legal journals and as part of a book collection, and my nature and landscape photography, appeared in a solo show at Sefiroth on Queen Street East in 2003.


 

David Larraguibel

dismemberedstates.com

David Freiderich Larraguibel was born in 1977, in Santiago Chile. Raised in Kitchener, Ontario, David moved to Toronto to attend the Ontario College of Art and Design where he obtained his AOCAD in Integrated Media. Following graduation he worked as a Commercial Photographer’s Assistant, Multimedia Designer, Digital Imager and Non-Linear Editor. David has also spent time abroad in Europe, Asia and South America looking for cultural parallels to further develop his ideas.


 

Dalton McCarthy

I, Dalton McCarthy, travelled to Western Ireland in November, 2006 to do some family history remembering. In Clare and Kerry I went to a library and a museum and walked for days in the countryside and towns and cities. I had a BIG dream in an old, dilapidated McCarthy castle. I woke up and walked on and on with my camera and rememberings.


 

Brooke Patton

Brooke Patton is a graduate of Ryerson University in Geodetic Sciences. He has been a photographer for 30 years and travelled throughout Africa, Asia, and South America as a land surveyor. He is also a serious astronomer, musician, cabinet-maker, and owner of a successful computer business in Geographic Information Systems. His out-of-world experiences include aerial photography and sky diving.


 

Simeon Posen

simeonposen.com  email: sim@simeonposen.com

Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with work spanning more than four decades. His studies in architecture and stage design contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs. Specifically, he illuminates the intricate parts expressing the structure of the whole, whether created by nature or by man. Posen’s technique, style and composition are influenced by photographers such as Marie Consindas, Wynn Bullock, Brett Weston and Ansel Adams with whom he studied in California. Receiving both federal and provincial grants, Posen has conducted extensive photographic studies of the architecture of France, Austria, Iran and Greece, as well as broadly documenting the Ontario landscapes and vistas across Canada.


 

Paul Schwartz

interlog.com/~oel/editors

Until recently I was staff photographer for both the University of Toronto and the U of T Press. In my work there I encountered many kinds of assignments: from photo illustrations for various scientific articles, anatomy textbooks and an atlas to the usual PR “grip and grins” and portraits. The emphasis was always on reporting “reality”. My photo work has continued without a darkroom thanks, of course, to the “digital revolution”. Recently I was short listed for ShotBox4, a collection of 10 photos based on the theme of “secrets”, and in 2005 I participated in the juried show, “Out of Place” as part of Contact. In my photo work I like to balance the tension between a human narrative, implied and often without a “cast”, and the aesthetic pleasures of form, composition, tone and colour. Also, for more than 12 years I have been editor/publisher of the poetry quarterly Jones Av. Which has combined poetry, artwork and reviews.


 

Frank Sodonis

Frank Sodonis was born in Jurbarkas, Lithuania, where he became a journalist for the Jurbarkas Repapswen. He immigrated to Canada in 1989 with his wife Tainaslov, in the Rushton Migration and now lives in King City. Mr. Sodonis is a swimming instructor and holds three Canadian swimming records. An avid amateur photographer for 25 years, he has been combining Litonian meditating philosophies of his native Lithuanian culture as a basis for his photographic approach to light display and perspective.


 

Olena Sullivan

photolena.ca

Olena Sullivan has worked as a graphic artist for over 15 years, and since discovering digital photography she has integrated this new medium into her design work as well as exhibiting throughout the GTA. She is constantly learning from her peers and through experimentation, and practices “found photography” — shooting her environment without disturbing or manipulating it. In her photographic work, she tends to focus on play of light and shadow, and interesting structure and shape in everyday objects. She exhibits regularly at the Charlotte Room with the Enemies Of The Ordinary rotating exhibit and has had her photography published by John Wiley & Sons, Master Point Press, and Digital Camera Magazine.


 

Rick Vincil

mrfinearts.com

A photographer for many years, Vincil began showing his photographs in 2001, and in 2003 became represented by Marcia Rafelman Fine Arts in Toronto. Two large bodies of work to date have been completed: “The Industrial Park Series” — a collection of images made at demolition sites in the vicinity of Toronto which address impermanence issues, and “The Shape of Shoreline” in which Vincil focuses on the documentation of large concrete structures not yet removed from Toronto’s beaches that address the ongoing gentrification of aquatic habitat and public safety. An urban landscape photographer, Vincil is currently at work on another environmentally directed series entitled “Arable Land” which is concerned with the overtaking of local, fertile soil by housing development and attending amenities, while food is trucked in from very distant climates.

Exhibition, Group Show

OUT OF THIS WORLD.. seeing the ordinary in an unordinary way 160 OUT OF THIS WORLD.. seeing the ordinary in an unordinary way

Perspectives... the art of seeing space

Sat Mar 10 00:00:00 2007

Saturday March 10, 2007, 2:30-5:30pm

The following was written to be shared within the gallery space:

 

perspectives
the art of seeing space

This work represents a work in progress, an exploration of space, of seeing space, this space, through the question ‘what is perspective’? Five artists agreed to come together in this inquiry. We met here in this space where you are now standing and set up to paint for a period of days. This work on the walls is the result of this shared attempt. I feel that we have just scratched the surface and that the work itself and your response to it will inspire its continuation.

From whereever you may place yourself within the space, in every direction you turn to face, a different perspective, a different point of view.

A white empty room. What is there to see, to perceive?

More than I can imagine, more than I can communicate and in the attempt to make what I see visible I see more. And the more I see the more impossible paint and canvas becomes...

So what is it for?

To look in order to see.

Thanks to artists Terri Quinn, Gilles Goyette, Sarah Hunter, Roger Chow, for using art as a medium to explore what is possible,

deborah harris, artist in residence

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

Perspectives... the art of seeing space 160 Perspectives... the art of seeing space

Gestures of Mercy

Sat Nov 18 00:00:00 2006

Saturday November 18 2:30-5:30 pm

 

Biographies

Stephanie Boyd was born and raised in south California. As a dancer and musician, she became involved in politically committed performance art at the University of California's San Diego campus. She later travelled around the United States and performed rallies and on street corners. Boyd returned to California and attended UCSC where she gained a solid understanding of art history and philosophy. She travelled through Europe visiting the major museums, painting in Spain and becoming involved in some performance art in Amsterdam. Returning to the United States she joined the School of Reductionism and continues to work in many mediums, music being an integral part of her work.

 


 

 

Roger Chow lives and works in Toronto. He often paints when others are sleeping and in this way paints often. He has been engaged for some time in an ongoing dialogue with deborah and the gallery space. This conversation has inspired artist workshops and follow-up shows of the work that emerges from them. Roger generously contributes his work and insight to the inquiry that the gallery creates space for.

 


 

 

Chris Dolan was born in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. After her studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Corcoran College of Art in Washington she moved to France where she continued studying at Les Beaux Arts in Grenoble and finished at Les Beaux Arts de aix-en-Provence. She has lived and exhibited her work in France for the past twenty years. She has just recently returned to the United States and it is from there that she brings her work to Toronto.

 


 

 

E.J. Gold is a master artist. His proficiency extends into many artistic media, including painting and sculpting as well as professional video and music recording, computer game writing, and virtual reality wizardry. Gold has created a diversified and monumental oeuvre in the course of the forty years of his career as an artist. All his work speaks of breathtaking vision, technical expertise, uncompromising discipline, and engaging humor.

E.J. was born in New York City in 1941. As the son of H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, he grew up surrounded by artists and intellectuals, the Who’s Who in the Arts in America of the 40's and 50's: Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Charles Laughton, Orson Welles, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Pete Seeger...

The New York School, Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Rico Lebrun and Fritz Schwaderer are among his early influences. A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, he was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.

Gold is a perceptual scientist who uses art as his primary investigative tool. He is the principal author of the Manifesto on Reductionism published jointly with the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artistic enclave at the cutting edge of experimentation in objective art where visual elaboration is reduced to a minimum. In keeping with the tenets of reductionism, instead of drawing on personal elements of past experience, the artist directs his attention to the world of stillness and silence that lies just on the other side of the veil.

Gold's work often violates scale, at once denying dimension and perspective. By making use of color, form, texture, negative space, forced perspective, compressions, color field and figure-ground relationships, Gold depicts the world beyond the boundaries of space and time, portraying timeless eternity.

Some of Gold's more well-known series of paintings include the Faces of War, PlanarContiguities, Odalisques, Guides, Moonbeam, White House Series, Expressionist Landscapes, Sanitarium Series, Angels, Monumentals, Haunted Corridors, and City in the Sky.

These powerful paintings by this remarkable shamanic artist are gateways to sublime mystical experiences. They are profoundly experiential and impenetrable by the mind but have the ability to awaken higher centers. Therein lies their key.

 


 

 

deborah harris serves as artist-in-residence at Gallery Arcturus. It is a title given to her by the gallery which simply means that her artistic inquiry happens and is made accessible within this space. Her work involves inviting other artists to participate in an inquiry and or finding specific examples of artists' work which can be shown in the gallery. She also conducts collage workshops at the gallery for public attendance and is available to meet and work with individuals.

 


 

 

Andrea Maguire was born in Toronto in 1955, and she still makes her home in the city. A widely exhibited artist, her studies in mythology, psychology and meditation help her to explore the human psyche and create new ways of expression in this world of perpetual change.

With degrees from the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Art, Maguire has worked as a teacher (art and history) and as an illustrator. She has exhibited in prestigious group shows since 1975, and more recently has presented her mixed media images in solo exhibitions in Toronto. Two resoundingly successful group shows in New York earlier this year led to a place at the Monserrat Gallery in Soho.

Maguire's reflective and meditative approach to her art is particularly in harmony with the spirituality of the ancient culture and sacred traditions that are still a vital part of Tibet today. Deeply moved by her recent visit, her beautiful abstract images with their interplay of texture, colour and collage, evoke the poignant sensations and the raw ancient energy she found imbued in the long forbidden land.

 


 

 

Kelly Rivera was born in Puerto Rico, she studied art and theatre at the University of Maryland and then move to New York City where she worked professionally in both mediums. Rivera considers Rico Lebrun, Tom Johnson and E.J. Gold as having had the greatest influence on her work. She also has been inspired by tantric art in its use of colour and stylization. In her most recent works, we can see references to the symbolist and Pre-Raphaelite imagery of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. She uses art as a "means to access a world that is usually unseen". Many of Rivera's works are influenced by her vivid dreams, past and present. She has been a member of the School of Reductionism for 12 years.

 


 

 

Adrian Symonds is a sculptor of wood presently living in British Columbia. His human figures hold a gesture, a posture with an inner attention we are drawn to enter. The forms that emerge from his hands possess strength and solidity balanced in movement. We at the gallery find many opportunities to incorporate these pieces into our shows.

Exhibition, Group Show

Gestures of Mercy 320 Gestures of Mercy

Doors Opening... at the theshold of what is

Tue Jul 4 00:00:00 2006

A door is a gesture. Vertical. Poised. Angled on its hinges. Seemingly thinner in its opened posture than the opening it can close on. A door has possibilities, swinging, slamming shut, swinging open, or slowly creeping, millimeter by millimeter. Maybe a door is at the end of a hall, maybe its handle is just in reach. A dark door, a light door, short, wide, heavy, almost weightless door. A door with a window is an open look but not an entrance. Doors demand permission in some form or other, a knock, a call for answer, but with doors opening something has already begun, the invitation is in the opening, is on the wall.

 

Biographies

Roger Chow lives and works in Toronto. He often paints when others are sleeping and in this way paints often. He has been engaged for some time in an ongoing dialogue with deborah and the gallery space. This conversation has inspired artist workshops and follow-up shows of the work that emerges from them. Roger generously contributes his work and insight to the inquiry that the gallery creates space for.

 


 

 

Katie Curtis began her relationship to deborah and to the gallery as a student of collage. She quickly became more of a colleague and artist in her own right delving into the use of acrylic on canvas and on mylar, charcoal and oil pastel on paper, and continues her work with collage. Some of her pieces can be seen on site here under the title PORTRAIT and most recently in DOORS OPENING.

 


 

 

E.J. Gold is a master artist. His proficiency extends into many artistic media, including painting and sculpting as well as professional video and music recording, computer game writing, and virtual reality wizardry. Gold has created a diversified and monumental oeuvre in the course of the forty years of his career as an artist. All his work speaks of breathtaking vision, technical expertise, uncompromising discipline, and engaging humor.

E.J. was born in New York City in 1941. As the son of H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, he grew up surrounded by artists and intellectuals, the Who’s Who in the Arts in America of the 40’s and 50’s: Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Charles Laughton, Orson Welles, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Pete Seeger…

The New York School, Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Rico Lebrun and Fritz Schwaderer are among his early influences. A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, he was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.

Gold is a perceptual scientist who uses art as his primary investigative tool. He is the principal author of the Manifesto on Reductionism published jointly with the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artistic enclave at the cutting edge of experimentation in objective art where visual elaboration is reduced to a minimum. In keeping with the tenets of reductionism, instead of drawing on personal elements of past experience, the artist directs his attention to the world of stillness and silence that lies just on the other side of the veil.

Gold’s work often violates scale, at once denying dimension and perspective. By making use of color, form, texture, negative space, forced perspective, compressions, color field and figure-ground relationships, Gold depicts the world beyond the boundaries of space and time, portraying timeless eternity.

Some of Gold’s more well-known series of paintings include the Faces of War, PlanarContiguities, Odalisques, Guides, Moonbeam, White House Series, Expressionist Landscapes, Sanitarium Series, Angels, Monumentals, Haunted Corridors, and City in the Sky.

These powerful paintings by this remarkable shamanic artist are gateways to sublime mystical experiences. They are profoundly experiential and impenetrable by the mind but have the ability to awaken higher centers. Therein lies their key.

 


 

 

Janos Gardonyi, a retired architect embarked on digital photography as a hobby using a large number of images collected during his travels. Janos states that “I never believed that one has to travel to exotic destinations to find subjects. I believe the most interesting venues are here, near your home. For the past year I photographed among other things old churches and townscapes of downtown Toronto. I strive to unveil new and unexpected visions in familiar scenes, newfound beauty in nature by using unusual angles, filters and colour combinations. I am also beginning to explore the microcosmos by discovering details and photographing smaller elements, especially in architectural photography”.

 


 

 

Scott Griffin was born in Oshawa, Ontario in 1970 and later moved with his family to Scugog Island. Following his family tradition may have led him to become a bush pilot but he wanted to build and make things. Scott describes himself as a pack rat, he says “I am driven by the materials I collect. I can’t leave something that I think is useful, I have to take it home, even if I don’t need it now. I see things in the material. The surfaces that I am drawn to tell me what to draw. They reveal a world to me if recognize.” A few years ago he bought a welder. In using it to make lines he realized he could draw with metal on metal. He has been working in this way for about three years. Scott is at present living in Toronto, doing his art at night and collecting in the day.

 


 

 

deborah harris serves as artist-in-residence at Gallery Arcturus. It is a title given to her by the gallery which simply means that her artistic inquiry happens and is made accessible within this space. Her work involves inviting other artists to participate in an inquiry and or finding specific examples of artists’ work which can be shown in the gallery. She also conducts collage workshops at the gallery for public attendance and is available to meet and work with individuals.

 


 

 

Gabriel Lalonde is a multidisciplinary artist from Quebec City, Canada. Visual artist, author, and poet, he lives in his words, and in his visual art evokes form, line and image. Self-taught, he was born in Montreal in 1945 and has lived in Quebec City for nearly twenty-five years. His days are dedicated entirely to his art. He paints and sculpts all materials, metal as easily as wood, canvas and paper.

 


 

 

Adrian Symonds is a sculptor of wood presently living in British Columbia. His human figures hold a gesture, a posture with an inner attention we are drawn to enter. The forms that emerge from his hands possess strength and solidity balanced in movement. We at the gallery find many opportunities to incorporate these pieces into our shows.

Exhibition, Group Show

Doors Opening... at the theshold of what is 160 Doors Opening... at the theshold of what is

In between

Sat Apr 29 00:00:00 2006

Saturday April 29, 2:30-5:30 pm

 

In between

earth and sky,
living and dying,
coming and going,

there are statues and stations,
still and moving,
silent and loudly proclaiming.

In the midst of stations
perhaps there are angels
shores along which they descend,
in between their world and ours.
The sacred and profane
return to the sea.

 


 

Simeon Posen, Pamela Williams, Joachim Oepkes,
these three artists return to those places that draw them,
again and again, to find what?
In European cemeteries, on downtown Toronto streets,
by lakes, rivers, waterfalls, off the beaten track and oceans stretching,
as far as the eye can see,
as close as the hand can touch,
something still unknown,
moving too fast to hold onto,
glimpsed between the opening and closing of a shutter.

deborah harris
April, 2006

 


 

Stations

There is an instant in everyone’s journey

whether in one’s room

or inside the oblivious sky

we search our face to see a face

our movements make us continue

but that stopping moment

forced by imagery

untrained eye frozen and seduced

soul paralysis

you are at a place

a station

that is the question.

by Joachim Oepkes

Exhibition

In between 320 In between Simeon Posen Pamela Williams Joachim Oepkes

facing the ineffable

Sat Mar 4 00:00:00 2006

Saturday March 11, 2006 2:30-5:30 pm

 

facing the ineffable
a collaboration of heart by Paul and deborah Harris

This work depicts Paul’s act of courage, the act of presence facing the terror of his situation.
I am merely trying to record it, to make it visible.
I am not brave, at best I am trying not to ride on the back of his courage.
Or maybe that is the only appropriate place to ride!
This is Paul’s show and I am riding on the back of his courage.

*

Paul has many friends and family members who fondly wish to remember him as he was in their shared history. This show is not a celebration of that history it is the acknowledgment of a journey he traveled by himself and that I was privileged, in moments, to be witness to. That privilege came with an obligation. This show attempts, as much as I am able, to honor and fulfill that obligation which I undertook as making his journey visible to those who would receive it.

*

Paul and I, on the day of his dying, communicated about this collaboration, my words spoken to his listening eyes. He was probably more aware than I of his death. He may also have been aware that the only gesture he was able to make was of the heart, the invisible feeling, and the lines that were being continually recorded as he lay. At the end of that meeting I spontaneously picked up the reams of ticker tape, his heart’s print-out piled on the floor. It occurred to me later that I had retrieved the only visible gesture he was able to make on his last day in this world. The mysterious rhythm of these lines have surrounded me throughout the process of creating this work. I have not tried to analyze or interpret, I have simply been moved.

*

The experience of being with Paul was a gift I want to share. It is his gift.

deborah harris
February, 2006.

Exhibition

facing the ineffable 160 facing the ineffable deborah harris Paul Harris

Angels

Sat Nov 26 00:00:00 2005

Saturday, November 26, 2:00-5:30pm

 

BIOGRAPHIES

E.J. Gold

E.J. Gold is a master artist. His proficiency extends into many artistic media, including painting and sculpting as well as professional video and music recording, computer game writing, and virtual reality wizardry. Gold has created a diversified and monumental oeuvre in the course of the forty years of his career as an artist. All his work speaks of breathtaking vision, technical expertise, uncompromising discipline, and engaging humor.

E.J. Gold was born in New York City in 1941. As the son of H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, he grew up surrounded by artists and intellectuals, the Who’s Who in the Arts in America of the 40's and 50's: Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Charles Laughton, Orson Welles, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Pete Seeger...

The New York School, Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Rico Lebrun and Fritz Schwaderer are among his early influences. A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, he was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.

Gold is a perceptual scientist who uses art as his primary investigative tool. He is the principal author of the Manifesto on Reductionism published jointly with the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artistic enclave at the cutting edge of experimentation in objective art where visual elaboration is reduced to a minimum. In keeping with the tenets of reductionism, instead of drawing on personal elements of past experience, the artist directs his attention to the world of stillness and silence that lies just on the other side of the veil.

Gold’s work often violates scale, at once denying dimension and perspective. By making use of color, form, texture, negative space, forced perspective, compressions, color field and figure-ground relationships, Gold depicts the world beyond the boundaries of space and time, portraying timeless eternity.

Some of Gold’s more well-known series of paintings include the Faces of War, PlanarContiguities, Odalisques, Guides, Moonbeam, White House Series, Expressionist Landscapes, Sanitarium Series, Angels, Monumentals, Haunted Corridors, and City in the Sky.

These powerful paintings by this remarkable shamanic artist are gateways to sublime mystical experiences. They are profoundly experiential and impenetrable by the mind but have the ability to awaken higher centers. Therein lies their key.

 


 

Andrea Maguire

Andrea Maguire was born in Toronto in 1955, and she still makes her home in the city. A widely exhibited artist, her studies in mythology, psychology and meditation help her to explore the human psyche and create new ways of expression in this world of perpetual change.

With degrees from the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Art, Maguire has worked as a teacher (art and history) and as an illustrator. She has exhibited in prestigious group shows since 1975, and more recently has presented her mixed media images in solo exhibitions in Toronto. Two resoundingly successful group shows in New York earlier this year led to a place at the Monserrat Gallery in Soho.

Maguire’s reflective and meditative approach to her art is particularly in harmony with the spirituality of the ancient culture and sacred traditions that are still a vital part of Tibet today. Deeply moved by her recent visit, her beautiful abstract images with their interplay of texture, colour and collage, evoke the poignant sensations and the raw ancient energy she found imbued in the long forbidden land.

 


 

deborah harris

deborah harris was born in Toronto. Her view of personal history is that you don’t need to know the details of a person’s life in order to perceive the wholeness that those experiences have given shape to. So saying she describes herself as someone who has learned through rigorous observation of self, of others and of the inner and outer world. Through drawing, painting and collage she is able to explore further those perceptions as they manifest in a gesture of now.

She left formal school at sixteen, traveled to Africa and Greece and when she returned completed teachers training in Yoga and in massage therapy.

She returned to school in /89 majoring in set and costume design at Ryerson Theatre School. She was teacher and custodian with Nusa Prijatelj of the Annex Art Centre in Toronto. Her first five shows were at the Annex Art Centre. " Gesture" Jan. /96, a solo exhibition of 26 collage images, " Five Pieces" Aug./96 five collage images shown with sculptures by J. Zapotochney. " heart of the eye" Jan./97, exhibition of drawings with J. Pulker. "In position for Use" Apr./97 an installation of chairs, poetry and collage with Nusa Priatlj. "Stalking The Absolute" Sept./97, an exhibition of oil paintings and drawings with sculptor Adrian Symonds.

In l998 she was asked to take the position of Artist in Residence at Gallery Arcturus, a position that was created to enable her to work in the gallery, giving workshops to groups, and meeting with those who choose to inquire into the nature of objective art.

 


 

Kelly Rivera

Born in Puerto Rico, she studied art and theatre at the University of Maryland and then move to New York City where she worked professionally in both mediums. Rivera considers Rico Lebrun, Tom Johnson and E.J. Gold as having had the greatest influence on her work. She also has been inspired by tantric art in its use of colour and stylization. In her most recent works, we can see references to the symbolist and Pre-Raphaelite imagery of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. She uses art as a “means to access a world that is usually unseen”. Many of Rivera’s works are influenced by her vivid dreams, past and present. She has been a member of the School of Reductionism for 12 years.

 


 

Chris Dolan

Chris Dolan was born in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. After her studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Corcoran College of Art in Washington she moved to France where she continued studying at Les Beaux Arts in Grenoble and finished at Les Beaux Arts de aix-en-Provence. She has lived and exhibited her work in France for the past twenty years. She has just recently returned to the United States and it is from there that she brings her work to Toronto.

 


 

Stephanie Boyd

Stephanie Louise Boyd was born and raised in south California. As a dancer and musician, she became involved in politically committed performance art at the University of California’s San Diego campus. She later travelled around the United States and performed rallies and on street corners. Boyd returned to California and attended UCSC where she gained a solid understanding of art history and philosophy. She travelled through Europe visiting the major museums, painting in Spain and becoming involved in some performance art in Amsterdam. Returning to the United States she joined the School of Reductionism and continues to work in many mediums, music being an integral part of her work.

Exhibition, Group Show

Angels 320 Angels

... what goes and what remains ... behind the walls

Wed Jul 6 00:00:00 2011

 

Art can be found … in the space …

can be the space …

on both sides of the glass

 

After a period of many years the windows onto the back courtyard have been uncovered. The effect is one of light and intimacy that welcomes visitors to sit, or wander through the installation. 

... what goes and what remains ...

A reconfiguration of pieces from the previous exhibit remains on display.  The atmosphere has been created of a courtyard and sculpture garden that is both inside and out of the gallery. Visitors will be surprised and delighted by the sense of space.

Exhibition

... what goes and what remains ... behind the walls ... what goes and what remains ... behind the walls

Errance

Sat Apr 30 00:00:00 2005

Saturday, April 30th, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Toronto ... Errance, an exhibition at Gallery Arcturus of photography by Dominique Cruchet and painting by Joan Cullen. The paintings are large format oils and mixed media on paper. The photographic images are shown in three categories, black and white silver prints, digital color prints and projected digital images. All these are from such different places as Yemen, Thaïland, China, France and Canada. The work mirrors the life style of the artists. The large format oils and black and white prints demand a sedentary existence whereas the projections and smaller works allow for roaming about. This the underlying meaning of j’erre, j’aére et gère.

Born in France, Dominique Cruchet recalls that his first encounter with images occurred in Paris at the Cinematheque du Palais de Chaillot. Inspired by what he saw, he began to take photographs of the streets. Later, when he adopted a travelling lifestyle, this practice became a study and he developed what he calls the eye of a ‘flaneur’. It wasn’t until 1982 that he formalized his studies in Visual Arts at the University of Ottawa and in Art History at the Sorbonne. His years as a student supported the documentary orientation which he had had from the beginning. Travelling and photography have continued hand in hand. Dominique’s images bring us into an intimate relationship with the far away landscapes through the vehicle of his seeing. The ordinary, the mundane, are made extraordinary within the frame of his seeing.

Joan Cullen says of herself that philosophy and travel have been the constants in her pictorial research, but it was during a long sejour in rural France that she learned the exotic character of everyday life. Painting and drawing have become a means of attaining a quality of attention that goes underneath language and grounds it. Joan says, “One elects oneself to do this work and then it must be assumed. Certain works name the places that are at once the landmarks of a permanent exile and the subject itself, others wrestle with the desire to approach or even get inside the subject. Against formulas and like violence, I propose with Paul Klee an endless study of the nature of nature...”.

Joan Cullen and Dominique Cruchet have been companions in work and travel, exhibiting together since 1991. Photography and painting are normally considered unsympathetic to each other but the collaboration of Joan and Dominique brings these different media into counterpoint, the view of one complementing the other. The result is a many faceted perception of the environments that they have explored together and a richer experience for the viewer.

Exhibition

Errance 320 Errance Joan Cullen Dominique Cruchet

Dominique Cruchet

Thu Jul 7 00:00:00 2011

It was not only when I first started to travel that photography was of prime importance. In my Parisien teenage years I used to spend time at the Cinémathèque du Palais de Chaillot and take photographs in the streets of Paris with friends.

Later travelling lent itself to this practice and because of this travelling some people have seen in the work the eye of a “flâneur”. It was only in 1982 that the desire to study Visual Arts came to me; first at the University of Ottawa and then at the Sorbonne in Paris in Art History. Those years of study confirm the documentary orientation already taken earlier.

In a village in the west of France where I lived for nine years it was possible to do a photographic study of the surrounding rural area in its pre-industrial agriculture state, and the book “Repères Quotidens” was published. While on short trips, some small projects came to light: Totem on Elgin Street, Ferry tail, Constructions Ephémères, and a long series of images on mail boxes.

Sabbatical years from teaching have allowed me to complete some themes and take images of new ones in many different places such as Tunisia, South-East Asia, China, Yemen and the south of France. More recently I have started to use digital photography to work on projection inside and outside on different material.

georges.cruchet@laposte.net

--

More on the exhibit "Crossing the Great Waters" by Dominique Cruchet and Joan Cullen is HERE.  The book "Crossing the Great Waters" can be seen HERE.

See bottom for more information, images and video on other websites.

 

Exhibitions

"Crossing the great waters,Traverser les grandes eaux", Gallery Arcturus Toronto, May 3 to June 14, 2014.

"Le temps soustrait la vérité aux atteintes de l'envie et de la discorde", Médiathèque de Gignac, February 14 to March 22, 2014.

FAVA (Visual Arts Festival), Caraquet, June 2013.

"Traverser les grandes eaux, Crossing the Great Waters", Confédération Centre Gallery, Charlottetown, PEI, June 12 to October 10, 2012.

"Ferry Tail" part of "Minding the Light" organised by the Museum and Heritage Foundation at the Confederation Centre, October 2011 to March 2012.

Participation in "Art in the Open", August 27th in Charlottetown and "Nocturne", October 15th in Halifax with a digital projection "Sculpture in the Park", images of sculptures from Parisian parks.

Residency at the Théâtre de la Fonderie au Mans and exhibition at Galerie Municipale de la Mairie du Mans, "Quatre vents", February to August, 2011. (Guest of Honour at Puls'art Visual Art Festival).

Farmer's Bank, Acadian Museum, Rustico, Gallery 18 and Farmer's Market, été 2010.

"Berlin to Brackley Beach via Beijing and Crete", Howes Hall Gallery, Brackley Beach, August 2009

"Attendant Spirits", Galerie F92, Berlin, Germany, August to October 2008.

"Photographie 101: Push the Button", 130 photographs by 58 Canadian and international artists over the last 140 years. Confederation Centre gallery. May to September 2008

"Mayday, Mayday, Islanders at Work", Municipal Gallery, Summerside, June, 2007, "The Construction of Islandness", Kier Gallery, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, July, 2007."Que défendirent-ils?" Galerie phot’eil, Fabrezan, visual projection for the Commemoration of the 1907 wine producer revolt.

"Murs, Murs", A projection exhibition at the Confederation Centre, Charlottetown (Toronto, Sana’a, Charlottetown and Paris) November to December 2005

Errance", Gallery Arcturus, April to June, 2005; "Sauta Roc" Galerie municipale de St-Guilhem-le-Désert, France, June 2005.

World Enough, and Time”, Annex Art Centre, Toronto, December, 2004.

Livre d’ heures ", FAVA (Visual Arts Festival), Caraquet, New Brunswick, Canada, July, 2002.

État des Lieux”, Art Gallery of the University of Moncton, New Brunswick; “Illuminations, Enluminures” Library of the University of Prince Edward Island, Canada, January, 2002.

Illuminations”, Lunenburg Gallery, Nova Scotia, Canada, September 2001.

Sud-est, Est(Southeast, East); Fondation Avicenne, Paris, November, 2000.

"Trees and Hedges", Exhibition to present a Land Art Project.; Gallery in the Guild, Prince Edward Island, Canada. Proposition to plant a twelve kilometer hedge; (three levels of vegetation with trees from the primitive Acadian forest) along the periphery of Charlottetown. May, 2000.

"Points Cardinaux", (Cardinal Points), Institute of Fine Arts, Sfax Museum of Mahdia, Tunisia, March-April, 1998. Municipal Gallery, La Chapelle-des-Marais and Pornichet Municipal Gallery, Pornichet, France, June to September, 1998.

Repères Quotidiens”, Exhibition at the Médiathèque of Le Mans, France on the occasion of the publication by the Médiathèque of a book of photographs from the exhibition. It documents the village of Villaines-la-Gonais where Cruchet and Cullen lived and worked for nine years. June to September, 1998.

"Ferry Tail", Gallery in the Guild, Charlottetown, Canada, September, 1997.

"Repères Quotidiens", University of Maine, France, February, 1996, Priory of Vivoin, France,May-June, 1995, Exhibition at Canada House, Cité universitaire, Paris ,1995.

Totem sur la rue Elgin”, Gallery am Weissensee, Berlin, June, 1994.

Constructions Ephémères”, Le Mans, France 1993, Angers, France

Champs animaliers", Angers, France.

Solo and group exhibitions in Bogotá, Charlottetown, Paris and Toronto, 1982-1985.

 

Education   Licence and Maitrise in Art History, University of Paris 1, La Sorbonne, Paris; Bachelor of Visual Arts, University of Ottawa, Canada.

 

Work in public collections   National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; Art Bank of Prince Edward Island; Museum of the Confederation Centre of the Arts, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island; Foundation for the Study of Objective Art: Gallery Arcturus, Toronto; Museum of the Post, Paris; Canadian Museum of Civilisation, Quebec; Historical Library of the City of Paris (BHVP) and the Médiathèque of the city of Le Mans.

 

More on previous exhibitions by Dominique Cruchet:

Exhibition catalogue for "Traverser les grandes eaux, Crossing the Great Waters":

http://www.blurb.com/b/3502750    A book review is HERE

Previous installation of the exhibit:

http://www.confederationcentre.com/en/exhibitions-archive-read-more.php?exhibition=50

and    http://thistownissmall.com/2012/06/15/you-are-cordially-invited/

 

"Le temps soustrait la vérité aux atteintes de l'envie et de la discorde", Médiathèque de Gignac, 2014: http://georgescruchet.wix.com/cullencruchet-gignac

http://www.blurb.ca/books/5395616-le-temps-soustrait-la-verite-aux-atteintes-de-l-en


Interview for "Quatre vents," a 2011 exhibit in Le Mans, France on local TV on YouTube


Errance"  at Gallery Arcturus, April to June, 2005:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?g=1&s=2005-04-30-errance


État des Lieux”, Art Gallery of the University of Moncton, New Brunswick, 2002:

http://139.103.17.11/Cruchet_Cullen/communique_etat_des_lieux.html

More information plus slideshows of Dominique's work:

http://139.103.17.11/Cruchet_Cullen/dominique_cruchet.html


Banque des oeuvres d'art de l'Ile du Prince Edouard - Island Art Collection

http://www.gov.pe.ca/tourism/index.php3?number=1018519&lang=E

http://www.gov.pe.ca/tourism/index.php3?number=1018520&lang=E


A photo essay by Cruchet on the ferries that formerly crossed the Northumberland Strait, via YouTube:  http://youtu.be/igj10xjkpjY

"Ferry Tail"  book  http://www.blurb.ca/b/3237894-f-e-r-r-y-t-a-i-l-1-9-9-6


http://www.blurb.ca/books/3215572-charlottetown-moncton

Artist

Dominique Cruchet Dominique Cruchet

s t i l l . . . u n f o l d i n g

Sat May 11 00:00:00 2013

Saturday May 11, 2013

still   enough to see

still     continuing to look

still     quietly expanding what is seen


images by
Barbara Kellam  James LaTrobe  Todd Howe

 

an installation of forms and photography

--

deborah harris, artist-in-residence:

The forms placed within the gallery space have evolved from an exploration which began in the summer of 2012 attempting to penetrate what is meant by ‘through and through’. This was initially undertaken by three artists who created the forms and used them as the subject for paintings. At the completion of the last show, ‘through and through Part Two: every other breath is out', it was decided that rather than dismantling the objects in the space I would ask three photographers, Jamie LaTrobe, Barbara Kellam and Todd Howe to engage with the existing forms as subject for a photographic exploration, ‘still... unfolding’.

They each came in independently, focusing on whatever drew their attention. Upon receiving the files of their images it was my role and commitment to choose those pieces which could come together as a cohesive body of work, reflecting the space and the theme of exploration. This show is the result of these efforts.

 

Barbara Kellam:

This was a very unusual photographic experience for me, very different from my regular outdoor shots and landscapes. I felt the challenge to see something different and these are the images that caught my attention.

Without the usual subject to shoot I could only rely on what drew my attention – the light playing on the glass jars, the strings in the frame, shapes, shadows and textures. And these were the result.


Todd Howe:

Why does photography remain relevant in a world dominated by the visceral, kinetic appeal of video? I think it's because at its best it aspires to a sort of visual poetry, an attempt to find meaning. When the gallery kindly asked me to take part in this experiment and engage with these interior spaces with my lens, I thought ok, fair question: is it possible to put a frame upon the walls themselves?

The viewer will have to judge for themselves how much these images found objective meaning in the forms and objects of the gallery, and how much they represent composition. A picture is such a thin slice of the world that when I'm trying to see it through the camera eye I'm drawn to patterns and new perspectives. Here, a striking juxtaposition. Over there, by that window, a mote of dust drifting in a sunbeam. Sometimes, the picture frame flattens or splinters into form, sometimes it suggests movement or gesture. Do these walls generate their own meaning, or do they simply frame the works we bring with us? Maybe it's both. I had a lot of fun exploring the gallery this way, and hope you do too.

flickr.com/photos/tehowe


James LaTrobe:

I am fortunate to have been able to take many pictures in Gallery Arcturus for many years. The space is not new to me, so I tried to see it in a new way. A photographer usually has to fight to make simple, effective  pictures without a cluttered background, but I found the gallery, with its white walls, to be ideal, although sometimes a technical challenge.

Even with blank walls with mostly flat surfaces, and minimal content, I was surprised at the visual complexity I found when I began to look. I was pushed to feel three-dimensional space and somehow try to capture that. In addition different light sources gave varied qualities of light and shadow in various locations and I was challenged to try to show that.

On my first day I was able to capture some shots that I liked, so on the second day I was more relaxed and playful and found that this helped me come up with images I like even more.

Seeing the images taken by the other photographers has been wonderful, and shows me how my own eye is somewhat habitual and my skill in seeing can be expanded.

dragonwhistle.ca

Exhibition

s  t  i  l  l  . . .	 u n f o l d i n g s  t  i  l  l  . . .	 u n f o l d i n g Barbara Kellam James LaTrobe Todd Howe

Susan Valyi

Fri Jan 6 00:00:00 2012

"As a sculptor I am interested in the creation of new forms and the three dimensional, tactile pleasure of a finished work. I like exploring unconventional materials. My work is mostly figurative with a mix of human and animal form. I would say what pleases me most is the exploration of gesture and pose but then I will turn around and cannibalize a chair to make a temple.

My work starts with collecting. I'm currently working mostly with old chairs and furniture that is beyond repair and has been discarded by the side of the road. Or begged from friends. Some of my sculpture take to complete so where the discard was pretty instantaneous, the rescue and transformation is long and involved. More than anything, the disassembling and reassembling satisfies my soul. I think it's probably a very personal gratification. I'm addicted to process even at the risk that a piece doesn't work out. My materials are unforgiving in that I can't reshape easily but that's where the excitement lies. In not knowing how something will turn out. Each piece is different. There's always a challenge.

My sculptural process is one of addition, rather than subtraction. I build up forms by adding and then I grind away. It's a continuous, long and messy process that was born of an accident years ago.

I work from my sketches. I certainly leave room for accidents to happen in the studio but I like the sketching. I like to have a good idea where I'm going before I start a piece. I like working with old wood which already has it's stories to tell. I sometimes find the most interesting inscriptions on the undersides of old chairs. One of the chairs I cut up had 'Mammy's chair 1945' scrawled under the seat. The wood is old seasoned and always surprisingly rich when I add a finish of tung oil. It's a challenge to make shomething out of nothing. I believe artists are guided in part by their materials.

I studied at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and though I have joked that it has taken me thirty-odd years to recover from the experience, there is only a bit of truth to it. I think all the experiences we have as artists give us context and experience, although somewhere along the line I discovered the truth that I work alone in more ways than one. My art experience is solitary in terms of exchange but I continuously study art in a very pop culture kind of way. I devour art magazines and go to galleries whenever I can.

I don't know what kind of art I make. I work on a more emotional level and a base one at that. Sometimes my work makes me laugh. Sometimes it's the post that make the humour.

I've been asked to give lectures on humour in art and I'm quite fascinated with the subject. It's not something you can plan. And it's contrary to the perception that art has to be serious to be taken seriously. I work until I please myself and if I have an audience, all the better. Audience for me is very important. I'm interested in uncomplicated art that doesn't need a lot of explanation to understand.

I live for the times when a new idea is born. It's exciting. I'm also happy when the kinks in a piece have been worked out and I can just indulge in the process. I rented an old wood working shop this winter to accommodate much bigger pieces. As I go along I find myself surrounded by these creatures as they evolve and take shape. It's like a room full of inanimate company. I like it. You can visit my Facebook page to see the work in progress.

I was born in Vancouver, British Columbia and for a great part of my life I move frequently until settling near a small French town, St. Eugene, Ontario on the Quebec border. If that's not confusing."

http://www.susanvalyi.com/works.html

https://www.facebook.com/susanvalyi/

Artist

Susan Valyi Susan Valyi

Joan Cullen

Thu Jul 7 00:00:00 2011

Artist's Statement

Philosophy and travel have been constants in my pictorial research but it was during a long sejour in rural France that I learned the exotic character of everyday life. Painting and drawing have become a means of attaining a quality of attention that seems to go underneath language and ground it.

One elects oneself to do this work and then it must be assumed. Certain works (“Bangkok”, “Entre Montréal et Québec”) name the places that are at once the landmarks of a permanent exile and the subject itself; others (“Champ aux marmottes”, “Hillsborough River”) wrestle with the desire to approach or even get inside the subject. Against formulas and like violence, I propose with Paul Klee an endless study of the nature of nature ...

joan.cullen@laposte.net

 

Exhibitions

"Crossing the great waters, Traverser les grandes eaux", Gallery Arcturus Toronto, May 3 to June 24, 2014.

"Le temps soustrait la vérité aux atteintes de l'envie et de la discorde", Médiathèque de Gignac, France, February 14 to March 22, 2014.

FAVA, Caraquet, June 2013.

"Traverser les grandes eaux, Crossing the Great Waters", Confédération Centre Gallery, Charlottetown, PEI, June 12 to October 10, 2012.

Residency at the Théâtre de la Fonderie au Mans and  exhibition at Galerie Municipale de la Mairie du Mans, "Quatre Vents", February  to August, 2011.

Beijing International Art Biennale, National Museum of China, Beijing, China, September-October 2010.

Gallery 18, New London, Farmer's Bank Museum, Rustico, P.E.I.

"Berlin to Brackley Beach via Beijing and Crete", Howes Hall Gallery, Brackley Beach, August 2009.

"Wrestling with Daemons, Jeux du destin", Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, P.E.I., Canada, November 2008 to January 2009.

"Attendant Spirits", Galerie F92, Berlin, Germany, August to October, 2008.

Beijing International Art Biennale, National Museum of China, Beijing, China, July to August, 2008.

"The Construction of Islandness", Kier Gallery, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, July, 2007."Que défendirent-ils?" Galerie phot’eil, Fabrezan, visual projection for the Commemoration of the 1907 wine producer revolt. Errance"  Arcturus Gallery,,Toronto. April-June, 2005."Sauta Roc" Galerie municipale de St-Guilhem-le-Désert , France, June, 2005.

 “World Enough, and Time.” Annex Art Centre, Toronto, December, 2004.

Rideaux entre nécessité et futilité", Festival des Arts visuels de Caraquet. July, 2002.

État des Lieux” Galerie d’Art de l’Université de Moncton, “Illuminations, Enluminures”, Robertson Library, University of Prince Edward Island,  January to February, 2002.

Illuminations”, Lunenburg Gallery , September, 2001.

Sud-Est, Est", Fondation Avicenne, Paris, November, 2000.

Trees and Hedges: Land Art Project”, Gallery in the Guild ,Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. May 2000. Proposal to plant a twelve kilometer traditional hedge (three levels of vegetation with Acadian forest essences) along the Charlottetown By-Pass.

"Identités hasardeuses", Exhibition during Philosophy Conference "Le Monde Le Mans", Congress and Culture Centre, Le Mans, France, October to December, 1998.

"Points Cardinaux", (Cardinal Points), Institute of Fine Arts, Sfax;  Museum of Mahdia, Tunisia, March-April, 1998.  Municipal Gallery, La Chapelle-des-Marais and Pornichet Municipal Gallery,  Pornichet, France,  June to September,1998.

"Hazardous Identities" Gallery in the Guild, Charlottetown, Canada, September, 1997.

 "Repères Quotidiens"  Université du Maine, France 1996,  Prieuré de Vivoin, France, 1995, Maison du Canada, Cité universitaire, Paris, 1995.

"A Hedge Where Once A Wall, Eine Hecke, Wo einst eine Maure War. Exhibition of land art; project to plant a traditional Celtic hedge where the Berlin Wall was… change  a cement wall into a hedge of Oak, Beech, Ash, Blackthorn, Wild Cherry, Spruce, Poplar, Linden, Hornbeam, Boxtree , Hazelnut … on three levels. The Celts referred to these hedges as “the part of the gods”. Gallery am Weissensee, Berlin, June, 1994.

Rencontres Canada Tunisie", Exhibition, Espace Sophonisbe, Carthage and participation at the Colloque: Art and the Spectator, University of Tunis, guest of the Canadian Embassy in Tunisia, Tunis, February 1994.

Exotique rural", Le Mans, France, 1993.

Champs animaliers", Angers, France and Interkuli, Cologne, Germany, 1992.

Solo and group exhibitions in Bogotá, Charlottetown, Hull, Montréal and Toronto, 1982-1985.

Education   Masters in Philosophy, Aesthetics, La Sorbonne, Paris: “Mémoire: Discours critique et oeuvres d’art, Gilbert Lascault, J.-F. Lyotard. (Critical Discourse and Works of Art) Licence de Philosophie, La Sorbonne, Paris. Bachelor of Arts, Carleton University, Ottawa.

Documentary Films   Poésie en peinture/Painted Poetry, directed by Monique Leblanc. This film explores the creative process through an exchange of works between Herménégilde Chiasson and Joan Cullen, 2000-2001. Participation in How do you enjoy life?, interview with Nicole Balderson, 2001 and Blood in the Snow, Norman Hall Janet Best, 1999.

Voyages   Europe, Mexico, West Indies, South America, Africa, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Yemen and several across Canada. Residencies   in France, Colombia, Kenya, and Tunisia.

Works  in the Confederation Centre Art Gallery, Charlottetown, PEI; The Musée de Tessé, Le Mans, France; The Chinese Artists Association, Beijing, China; Foundation for the Study of Objective Art: Gallery Arcturus, Toronto, and in numerous private and corporate collections in Canada, France, Colombia and Germany.

 

More on Joan Cullen in Painter's Progress:

http://sbmacinnis.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/the-5-to-watch-those-who-paint/

 

More on previous exhibits by Joan Cullen (with Dominique Cruchet):

Exhibition catalogue for "Traverser les grandes eaux, Crossing the Great Waters":

http://www.blurb.com/b/3502750    A book review is HERE

Previous installation of the exhibit:

http://www.confederationcentre.com/en/exhibitions-archive-read-more.php?exhibition=50

and    http://thistownissmall.com/2012/06/15/you-are-cordially-invited/

 

"Le temps soustrait la vérité aux atteintes de l'envie et de la discorde", Médiathèque de Gignac, 2014: http://georgescruchet.wix.com/cullencruchet-gignac

http://www.blurb.ca/books/5395616-le-temps-soustrait-la-verite-aux-atteintes-de-l-en

 


Interview for "Quatre vents," a 2011 exhibit in Le Mans, France on local TV via YouTube


Errance"  at Gallery Arcturus, April to June, 2005:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?g=1&s=2005-04-30-errance


État des Lieux”, Art Gallery of the University of Moncton, New Brunswick, 2002:

http://139.103.17.11/Cruchet_Cullen/communique_etat_des_lieux.html

More information, images of Joan's work:

http://139.103.17.11/Cruchet_Cullen/joan_cullen.html

Artist

Joan Cullen Joan Cullen

kathedra

Sat Feb 5 00:00:00 2005

Saturday, March 12, 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

Chair:   Gr.:  kathedra, CATHEDRAL.

the essence of waiting

presence of attention

posture of watchfulness

seated.

 

Seven artists willing to take a seat, not for comfort but for inquiry ... what is the gesture of chair?

These seven Toronto based artists: Jo Forbell, Colleen Costello, deborah harris, Roger Chow, Sarah Hunter, Terri Quinn, Gilles Goyotte, agreed to explore over a two day period, working together in the gallery space of Arcturus, the question of what is the gesture of chair?

They came together on a Friday evening and set up materials; canvases, paper, easels, drop cloths, in the gallery itself, returning on Saturday morning with the commitment to work throughout that day and the next. One other time was set aside for hanging. What emerged from this marathon of shared attention is real ‘art work’, that is, examples of the work that an artistic process is able to facilitate. As viewers of the exhibition we are invited to enter into the space which inspired and made accessible this inquiry. There is an immediacy and unity to the different forms which this search has revealed. It initiates something which wants to be continued. Chairs will never appear the same or as mundane again.

For those who acknowledge art as a necessary call to being present in the world, and artists as those who have the job of dismantling our assumed notions of what is, this is an exceptional and not to be missed art event.

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

kathedra 160 kathedra Jo Forbell, Colleen Costello, deborah harris, Roger Chow, Sarah Hunter, Terri Quinn, Gilles Goyotte

Gesture

Thu Jul 22 00:00:00 2004

Saturday, July 17, 2004, 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

we met

we prepared

different shapes and sizes

shared space

shared intention

work the gesture

gesture the work

seven artists three days

and on the third day we cleared the space

we hung the work

we stood back and viewed the work

of seven artists

three days

a

gesture

 

Artists' Workshops

The form for an artist’s workshop came about after many conversations over a two year period primarily between Roger Chow and myself, deborah harris. The collage workshops had been an ongoing, open to the public, afternoon event for some years and had shown us some of what is possible working in a group together in the gallery space. We wanted to expand upon that idea including other mediums and artists who might welcome an experience outside of their own studios. Roger and I together invited five artists that we knew, to attend a marathon weekend of painting.

The first invitation attempted to make the participants aware of the mandate that I have held myself to as ‘artist in residence’. I wanted them to have a sense of what they were agreeing to before they signed on. And so I asked…

“Whatever goals and ambitions you have had as artists can you suspend those motivations, the expressions of opinions yours and others, in order to observe gesture, movement, colour, texture, form, as it appears? Can the work itself be a search, a journey into the unknown? Can you take your work seriously as opposed to taking yourself seriously?

We met, most of us for the first time Friday evening. The first meeting was used to familiarize ourselves with each other, the space and the materials provided and to choose and prepare our individual work spaces. In our first discussion we agreed upon ‘gesture’ as the theme for exploration.

Saturday morning we arrived with food and a favourite music disc to share. The environment quickly became a concentrated workspace where nothing else was asked for but complete engagement, a task we discovered to be exciting, challenging, exhausting and surprising. Participants left early or late depending on their own energy level. I agreed to stay til the last one finished.

Arriving Sunday was a very different experience coming into the space already full with an incredible outpouring of paintings from the previous day, it was hard to know where to begin. By mid-afternoon we declared ourselves finished, cleaned and cleared the space so we could stand back and look at what had been accomplished without the clutter of the process. In this first workshop there were sixty three paintings completed. The energy and attention manifest in the work was extraordinary. We collectively grouped the pieces not by artists but by the relationship between the pieces. In effect we created a new body of work from the individual fragments. When this was complete we set dates and designed an invitation for an exhibition and opening reception.

deborah harris
May 2009

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Group Show

Gesture 160 Gesture

Contact Series

Sat May 1 00:00:00 2004

Saturday, May 1, 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

View the Media Release for more details here

Monday, April 5, 2004                        
                           
PIECES OF HOPE by Joachim Oepkes
HIDE AND SEEK by Wendy Rombough
SIGNS IN STONE by Lenka Holubec



Toronto...three artists will be represented at Gallery Arcturus in the CONTACT 2004 show, opening Saturday May 1, 2004.

PIECES OF HOPE by Toronto artist Joachim Oepkes, looks to find, scraping the surface, peeling back time, what is our place in history?  Can there ever be a summation of human experience?  Can hope be found in collected images pieced together, an atheist’s prayer.

Oepkes, in his art, negotiates media imagery, creating juxtapositions within the moment of history we are in.  Pieces of Hope is a composite of 96 photo images brought together in this most recent work. Joachim Oepkes has exhibited at the Annex Art Centre, AREA and Arcturus. He is a full time professor in the School of Animation and Design at Sheridan College.

In SIGNS IN STONE, Lenka Holubec continues her exploration of nature’s remarkable creative powers as manifested in rock formations.  Looking through the lens she tries to reach out and connect with nature as our home and as a reality which seems to be increasingly beyond our self-absorbed and anguished living.  Signs in Stone reveals as artifacts countless variations of signs found on dolomite stones constituting the backbone of the Bruce Penninsula – part of the Niagara Escarpment. Slowly and meticulously sculpted by wind, water and ice for millions of years, intricate signs in stone inspire us to contemplate the origins of our creativity.

Born in the Czech Republic, Lenka Holubec studied at the Film and Video Department of York University in Toronto and worked as an independent filmmaker on feature and documentary projects.  She has increasingly devoted herself to the field of still photography using it as a tool to communicate our connectedness to the natural world surrounding us.  The artist acknowledges the generous support of the Ontario Arts Council.

HIDE AND SEEK by Wendy Rombough observes the gesture of hiding and searching through the spontaneous explorations of a child.  Rombough has made her profession as a Toronto based  photographer, who does commissioned portraiture as well as editorial and commercial assignments.  As a mother she has watched her own children in the discovery of their world.  Her portraits reflect the child as he or she appear and disappear in front of the camera’s eye.  This most recent work depicts the expression of that quality so apparent in children and yet there in all of us:  the desire to be both seen and unseen, the impulse to hide and seek.

Gallery Arcturus is a not-for-profit exhibition space dedicated to contemporary art.  It is funded by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art.  The gallery is located at 80 Gerrard St. East.    Hours are Tues.-Fri. 12noon-5:30pm, Saturday 11am-5:30pm.  Admission is free.

Exhibition

Monday, April 5, 2004                        
                           
PIECES OF HOPE by Joachim Oepkes
HIDE AND SEEK by Wendy Rombough
SIGNS IN STONE by Lenka Holubec



Toronto...three artists will be represented at Gallery Arcturus in the CONTACT 2004 show, opening Saturday May 1, 2004.

PIECES OF HOPE by Toronto artist Joachim Oepkes, looks to find, scraping the surface, peeling back time, what is our place in history?  Can there ever be a summation of human experience?  Can hope be found in collected images pieced together, an atheist’s prayer.

Oepkes, in his art, negotiates media imagery, creating juxtapositions within the moment of history we are in.  Pieces of Hope is a composite of 96 photo images brought together in this most recent work. Joachim Oepkes has exhibited at the Annex Art Centre, AREA and Arcturus. He is a full time professor in the School of Animation and Design at Sheridan College.

In SIGNS IN STONE, Lenka Holubec continues her exploration of nature’s remarkable creative powers as manifested in rock formations.  Looking through the lens she tries to reach out and connect with nature as our home and as a reality which seems to be increasingly beyond our self-absorbed and anguished living.  Signs in Stone reveals as artifacts countless variations of signs found on dolomite stones constituting the backbone of the Bruce Penninsula – part of the Niagara Escarpment. Slowly and meticulously sculpted by wind, water and ice for millions of years, intricate signs in stone inspire us to contemplate the origins of our creativity.

Born in the Czech Republic, Lenka Holubec studied at the Film and Video Department of York University in Toronto and worked as an independent filmmaker on feature and documentary projects.  She has increasingly devoted herself to the field of still photography using it as a tool to communicate our connectedness to the natural world surrounding us.  The artist acknowledges the generous support of the Ontario Arts Council.

HIDE AND SEEK by Wendy Rombough observes the gesture of hiding and searching through the spontaneous explorations of a child.  Rombough has made her profession as a Toronto based  photographer, who does commissioned portraiture as well as editorial and commercial assignments.  As a mother she has watched her own children in the discovery of their world.  Her portraits reflect the child as he or she appear and disappear in front of the camera’s eye.  This most recent work depicts the expression of that quality so apparent in children and yet there in all of us:  the desire to be both seen and unseen, the impulse to hide and seek.

Gallery Arcturus is a not-for-profit exhibition space dedicated to contemporary art.  It is funded by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art.  The gallery is located at 80 Gerrard St. East.    Hours are Tues.-Fri. 12noon-5:30pm, Saturday 11am-5:30pm.  Admission is free.

Contact Series Contact Series Lenka Holubec Wendy Rombough Joachim Oepkes

Seeking Vision

Sat Feb 28 00:00:00 2004

Saturday, February 28, 2:30-5:30pm

 

Biography

Ruth Luginbuehl was born in Switzerland. She completed her studies in medicine and pediatrics at the University of Basel and in Fine Art at the School of Arts in Lucerne. She has since brought together the healing of art with children as an art therapist here in Toronto. Her work is an exuberant and joyful exploration and inquiry. It is her intention to return to the Far North, paints and brushes in hand, in the late spring.

Exhibition

Seeking Vision Seeking Vision Ruth Luginbuehl

Chris Dolan

Thu Jul 7 00:00:00 2011

Chris Dolan was born in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. After her studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Corcoran College of Art in Washington she moved to France where she continued studying at Les Beaux Arts in Grenoble and finished at Les Beaux Arts de aix-en-Provence. She has lived and exhibited her work in France for the past twenty years.

Description:
The works of Chris Dolan offer a metaphor for human angst in an era of painterly exploration and frustration. As spectacles of meaningful figuration struggling to come into being through formal disruptions and a limited palette of earth tones, her brashly intent paintings display richly textured surfaces laden with emotional content. These expressive abstractions are described in various tones of browns, blacks and terra cottas that make reference to primitive cave paintings and the sepia drawings of the great masters. Colors as thick as tar vie with fluid and loose brushwork and instinctive drawing and scratching to imbue the surfaces with a neo-expressionist energy. In paintings that explore the human figure as a vehicle for visual interaction, she studies anatomical structure before endowing their images with an ambiguity of content and distorted reality.

The figures she defines tend to fray and bleed, invade and become one another in every imaginable way as they are subsumed by the immediacy of the thickly layered surface textures and vigorous markings. As if the substance of inscrutable walls, they range from the boldly defined to mere linear suggestions and have an innate vitality that seems to emerge from the depths of the paint. There is a pervasive energy in her gestural abstractions and saturated expressionist brush. The freedom and spontaneity of Chris Dolan’s painting techniques allow the richly textured imagery to dominate the canvas with an arresting presence that is as provocative as it is mysterious.

- Carol Damian

Dr. Carol Damian is Professor of Art History in the School of Art and Art History and former Director and Chief Curator of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University. 

http://www.skotforeman.com/Chrissy-Dolan-Terrasi.cfm

Artist

Chris Dolan Chris Dolan

Psalm

Sat Sep 27 00:00:00 2003

Exhibition

Psalm Psalm deborah harris E.J. Gold

Persisting in Presence

Thu Nov 13 00:00:00 2003

Sunday, November 16th, 6:30-9:00pm

Exhibition

Persisting in Presence Persisting in Presence Chris Dolan

E.J. Gold

Thu Jul 7 00:00:00 2011

E.J. Gold is a master artist.  His proficiency extends into many artistic media, including painting and sculpting as well as professional video and music recording, computer game writing, and virtual reality wizardry.  Gold has created a diversified and monumental oeuvre in the course of the forty years of his career as an artist.  All his work speaks of breathtaking vision, technical expertise, uncompromising discipline, and engaging humor.

E.J. Gold was born in New York City in 1941.  As the son of H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, he grew up surrounded by artists and intellectuals, the Who’s Who in the Arts in America of the 40's and 50's: Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Charles Laughton, Orson Welles, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Pete Seeger...

The New York School, Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Rico Lebrun and Fritz Schwaderer are among his early influences.  A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, he was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.

Gold is a perceptual scientist who uses art as his primary investigative tool.  He is the principal author of the Manifesto on Reductionism published jointly with the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artistic enclave at the cutting edge of experimentation in objective art where visual elaboration is reduced to a minimum.  In keeping with the tenets of reductionism, instead of drawing on personal elements of past experience, the artist directs his attention to the world of stillness and silence that lies just on the other side of the veil.

Gold’s work often violates scale, at once denying dimension and perspective.  By making use of color, form, texture, negative space, forced perspective, compressions, color field and figure-ground relationships, Gold depicts the world beyond the boundaries of space and time, portraying timeless eternity.

Some of Gold’s more well-known series of paintings include the Faces of War, PlanarContiguities, Odalisques, Guides, Moonbeam, White House Series, Expressionist Landscapes, Sanitarium Series, Angels, Monumentals, Haunted Corridors, and City in the Sky.

These powerful paintings by this remarkable shamanic artist are gateways to sublime mystical experiences.  They are profoundly experiential and impenetrable by the mind but have the ability to awaken higher centers.  Therein lies their key.

http://www.hei-art.com/

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

Artist

E.J. Gold E.J. Gold

Portrait

Sat Jul 5 00:00:00 2003

A caste of features

Two eyes, a nose and mouth

A caste of features in any voice pronounced a face.

What combinations these adhere

to make expression.

What subtle turn of cheek

and lift of chin will alter innuendo

to another meaning still and

cannot be, cannot remain unmoving.

Oh face what dost thou reveal when I’m not looking.

Shatter the mask that wears me inside out

that wears me out.

I am no more this than that

portrait

In the eye of the beholder

The heart of the eye

The eye of the storm

Seeing.

     – anonymous

Exhibition

Portrait Portrait deborah harris Katy Curtis Ayokah

One Hand Clapping

Sat Apr 26 00:00:00 2003

Saturday, April 26, 2:30-5:30pm

Mongolia, Bhutan ... places that in childhood seemed impossibly remote, mysterious.  And now, these extraordinary photographs of them do not lessen, but intensify, the sense of mystery.  No longer remote in space but lost in time, ancient artifacts embedded in natural forms like jewels in living settings mock our agitated singularity with their collective stillness and unperturbed knowing.

 

One Hand Clapping

The Miracle of the natural world

The Sands of ancient chants

The Buddhas of Oriental caves

Lead us to a space of stillness,

meditation and knowledge

... Elaine Ling

 

 Review:   Touchstones of an Inner Empire: The photographs of Elaine Ling

by Marcus Schubert                            Toronto, 2000

"What was any art but a mould in which to imprison for a moment the shining elusive element which is life itself; life hurrying past us and running away, too strong to stop, too sweet to lose."
– Willa Cather

In our experience of art, the message of a painting, sculpture, dance, concerto or photograph lies somewhere beyond the bounds of a structured form that contains it. The colossal shape and cosmic import of a symphony by Anton Bruckner is not perceived by looking at his score, or in the audible vibration of the instruments that play it. The aesthetic experience is in itself a creative, cognitive process where information is captured then reassembled by the senses and our psyche. The poetry of a work of art is recreated in that uniquely human domain of our collective imagination. Similarly, the significance of an image cannot be found in ground pigment, typewritten characters, chipped stone, silver halides, or even on the picture plane, for the essence of an artist’s vision exists in the speculative, immaterial realm of thought itself.

From the earliest Paleolithic scribbling deep within the shelter of ancient caves to the bold, avant–garde excavations that designate the poetics of space as "negative architecture," the transformation of our earthly landscape finds enduring expression throughout the history of art. Landscape, as a visual metaphor becomes the setting for a visionary experience, an imaginary world where the visitor embarks upon a quest to grasp associations between humanity, nature and God. The sublime landscape paintings of William Turner tell us more about the artist’s internal reaches, and the genius of his understanding of colour and light as spiritual equivalents, than describe any tangible place.

Photographs from Elaine Ling’s journeys into the landscape find a place within this ethereal context. They evoke ideas of a pilgrimage, each image becoming a momentary altar‹a station prepared for the act of observance and contemplation. Her carefully framed compositions show architecture and sculpture as elements in collaboration with their surroundings. Some images are emblematic juxtapositions that read as sacred and hieroglyphic tablets. All her work exudes a calm yet eerie vitality, revealing far more than simply evidence of her travels, it presents a vision inspired by the paradox of ever changing yet eternal processes. Ling’s images of stone express the fleeting glimpse of a distant past and the savour of evolution.

Her pictures take us beyond conventional geography and into regions where musings about the ultimate supremacy of nature and the transience of matter share a common horizon with spiritual life. These images eloquently lay testimony to Elaine’s personal quest into quiet anxious territories of self–reflection. Her works together form the integrated vision of an inner architecture, a spiritual empire where one is invited to traverse uncertain terrain and speculate on the nature of reality and spirit. Ling’s dialogue with the landscape lies well beyond the picture plane, forming a visionary meditation dedicated to those things that are impermanent and surreal, and those, which endure.

Exhibition

One Hand Clapping One Hand Clapping Elaine Ling

Elaine Ling

Thu Jul 7 00:00:00 2011

http://www.elaineling.com/                                         From 2003:

Drawn to both mythic and deserted places, Elaine Ling has photographed desert and rock scapes throughout the world, including sand filled houses of a diamond mining ghost town in Nambia, San rock drawings of South Africa and Zimbabwe, the Atacama Desert in Chile, ghost towns of abandoned silver mines in Mexico, paleolithic rock engravings in the high Atlas Mountains in Morocco, Anazasi pictograms and petroglyphs in the American Southwest, tombs of the emperors of four dynasties along the Spirit Roads of China, the ancient city of Petra in Jordan, Persepolis in Iran and temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia. Her recent work is in Cuba and Bhutan.

Ling has exhibited her work extensively in the United States as well as in Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Czech Republic, Russia and Mexico.

Her photographs are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Texas, the Houston Center of Photography, Texas, the Henry Buhl Foundation in NYC, the Brooklyn Museum, NYC, the Musee de la Photographie in Charleroi, Belgium, the Museet for Fotokunst in Odense, Denmark. In Canada she is collected by the North York Gallery in Toronto, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the Canada Council Art Bank in Ottawa and the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa.

Artist

Elaine Ling Elaine Ling

Lost in Light

Sat May 2 00:00:00 2015

Saturday, May 2 from 2 - 5pm

Photography by Gilles Goyette.

An exhibition that is part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.


Gilles Goyette is first and foremost a poet whose language is sometimes sound, sometimes words and in this new body of work, photography. He has placed his camera to be witness to the same corner over days, weeks, months ... suns rising and setting, and the movement of those who wander into and out of this frame. In this exhibition a thousand moments play before our eyes, surprising and delighting with their unique and unrepeatable gestures.

 

Exhibition

Lost in Light 320 Lost in Light Gilles Goyette

Stories from the Ancestors

Sat May 2 00:00:00 2015

Saturday, May 2 from 2 - 5pm

Stories by Kazuyoshi Takayama interpreted in
collage images by Vivian Felsen.

A book inspired by this exhibition is available here

In the second floor Collage Gallery from May 2 to June 13.


Reception: Saturday, May 2 from 2 to 5pm

Exhibition

Stories from the Ancestors 320 Stories from the Ancestors

Eric McConnachie

Tue Apr 28 00:00:00 2015

Canvases and oil paint sketches by Eric McConnachie

McConnachie paints out in the woods, on the lakes and by the roads -- about three hours north of Toronto

See Facebook for more images: https://www.facebook.com/events/1456675541326215/

More work by the artist on arcturus.ca here

On Twitter:    https://twitter.com/rust_e_bear/media

up_north

Exhibition

Eric McConnachie Eric McConnachie

All That Jazz

Sat Feb 1 00:00:00 2003

The Grass Valley Graphics Group, many of whom are also musicians and appreciators of jazz, has a history of creating art on a Jazz Theme.  The Group participated in the recent Harlem Renaissance Art Tour which began at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and went on throughout the country.

R.C. Trice is well-known for his ceramic bags of Jazz Greats.  Tom X produced the memorable series of New Orleans Jazz Musicians. 

E.J. Gold has produced portraits of a hundred musicians – some for television shows – and is well-known for his Gesture Musician Pastels, elegant renderings of musicians, now produced as prints and notecards, including “Getting Into The Swing of Things” on display at Empire Music.

The Grass Valley Graphics Group has a long history of collaborative projects including representing the U.S. throughout the former Soviet Union in the 1990's USA/USSR Art Tour.

From an Interview with Wynton Marsalis

by Robbert C. Trice

On the evening of November 24th, a few minutes before he went on stage at the Veterans Memorial Building in Grass Valley, I had the good fortune to be able to talk with jazz great Wynton Marsalis.  I represented a collaborative group of Nevada County artists, a local radio station, and a local art magazine who sought to further the splash Mr. Marsalis had made by coming to our rural community – Robbert Trice

Trice: Why is it important to teach our young people about music and art?

Marsalis: Because the Art and the Music, like all of the arts, interpret the mythology of our country, of an era and an epoch.  They are really a painless way to teach many fundamentals.  And it’s ‘cause there are always new artists that those fundamentals are always being amended.  They are a way to train the senses, and to participate in the human experience and in the heritage of mankind.

Trice: Do you see any way in which music and visual arts can come together like they have here?

Marsalis: This gig is extremely hip.  I’ve never been in a place like this before – where the music is with things like that (the art) ... This was beautiful.  It made the space a whole lot more alive!  Jazz, jazz themes, different styles of everybody’s art ... a feeling of community where everybody is coming together in a meaningful way.  This is something that surely should happen more.

Trice: Your coming here inspired quite a cross-community sort of thing: “Okay, let’s make this a special thing.”

Marsalis: You can tell when you’re here that that is part of it.  It’s like a dream I have of really integrated arts.  Ballet, film and theater and music and visual arts – all arts come together in one space, on one particular theme.

Art gives us more of a sense of who we are, where we are, where we want to be.  It’s an easy way to teach important things, through metaphor, through reenactment and reiteration ... You’re telling a story and that’s like literature, except it’s not written down.  It’s theater.  It’s drama.  You are trying to make that event come alive to somebody else who was not there. (The arts) Testify to existence.  They’re designed to communicate what you know, and what you perceive.

I read about a revival of the Greek idea of theater.  They had songs that everybody knew, they had masks, and other visual elements ... and the feeling of community unfolding, resulting in literature ... there was something of various elements.  I think it’s time for a lot more integration, not just within the arts, but integration, period.  It’s time to understand how all the forms intertwine, bringing things together.

It all comes from that same impulse, except it (the art), deals with the greater themes.  Because that’s what’s interesting.  Not just interesting to us, but to all other people.  That’s what was interesting to Picasso, to Matisse, that’s what was interesting to Shakespeare, to Beethoven – because that’s what’s interesting!  It can seem complex, but it is not.

Trice: I remember something you said on the Ken Burns JAZZ series, when you said that your father had said: “Look, if you want to be different from anybody else, do what other people don’t want to do: practice.”

Marsalis: Right. “Do what they are not willing to do.”  That’s what he said.  “If you really want to be different, here is the key to being different.”

Trice: What is the difference between learning from a working artist versus learning from a formal educator?

Marsalis: A lot of times the formal educators work in a system and you know they can’t curse, and they have to treat you like they have a certain distance, ‘cause they’re dealing with numbers and they’re dealing with a system.  And, you know, they’re also dealin’ with people’s sensibilities.  I mean, I played places where people say: “Don’t touch the kids.  You can’t tell them this.”  You know, I’m always puttin’ my hands on you (touches Trice) ... It’s too formal, it’s a stylized way of working.  Whereas with a working artist, you know, you’re just there.  And he just says: “Look at that!  Fix that!”

Students need to learn that you don’t go to school, you don’t study a course, because it’s easy to do.  We have to figure out how to make it interesting for them once we get them into it.  That’s part of our job.  We’re not looking for them to establish the curriculum.

I guess that’s why I was realizing that this workshop is not only an inspiration for kids, but it is an inspiration for the musicians – who are here to try to challenge themselves with this music.  And you come and play with them, and it’s that kind of quality and force.  It gets them back into “Wow!  This is what I want to do!”

Exhibition

All That Jazz All That Jazz Grass Valley Graphics Group

Whale... collected sightings

Sat Oct 26 00:00:00 2002

Saturday, October 26, 2:30 - 5:30pm

WHALE /

You have eaten light for years awaiting this
Now as up upon her laddered ribs
colour in your hands like love inside a woman
you paint the whale's body, the surface of the sea
climb down inside her
your ears alive with beating
her own heart milking yours in the palm of its hand
a guided faith walk
through green stark arc
ribs a range of glistening skin
At last like the eye of the beneath
light pours from her mouth like opals
a pure unstoppable breath.

Degan Davis

A slow momentum of whale
who's in motion, on purpose
but with no pretense.
Holder of knowledge
and so,
a library of the balance
of an overwhelming all.

k.

Through your eyes
I see the horizon
whale is the ocean
and what lies beneath
wholly self sufficient
holy as in sacred, as in unfathomable
Deep within Jonah prayed to be returned
to the Beloved.

d.

Exhibition

Whale... collected sightings Whale... collected sightings deborah harris Katie Curtis

Clouds

Sat Apr 27 00:00:00 2002

Saturday, April 27, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

Exhibition

Clouds Clouds Simeon Posen

Winter Reflections

Sat Apr 27 00:00:00 2002

Saturday, April 27, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

 

more on Neil Fox here

Exhibition

Winter Reflections Winter Reflections Neil Fox

the limits of control

Thu Sep 11 00:00:00 2014

Saturday, October 18, 2:30 - 5:30 p.m.

 

   t h e    l i m i t s   o f   c o n t r o l



This work began as a single painting, an interpretation of the mass migration of children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador through Mexico to the American border.

Once the painting was finished it seemed to represent something less specific and I saw it more as a part of our human condition. I looked at images of other walls, in other places, built now and in other times and I began to feel the sensation of facing resistance not simply in walls erected by the collective but those I construct around myself. The more I explored this the more hopeless I became. This was not a show that I wanted to create or put in front of viewers but I was also not able to walk away from it. I wanted to discover a response  not  found in tanks and missiles, encampments and legislation. From somewhere the image came to me of catapulting, vaulting over the wall. With that came a sense that it is and must be our individual challenge to leap over those walls. That freedom is not something which can be given but must be found.

This is not a request to ignore oppression, either those who oppress or those who are oppressed.  

Limits relate to the boundaries of our perception. They are defined by us, passed on and accepted or rejected by us. Anything beyond those limits is unknown. Because we fear the unknown we attempt to control those boundaries and hide behind them.

This work represents the fortress and the daring possibility of leaping.

 

artist in residence  deborah harris

-- --

see YouTube videos inspired by this show here and here

Toronto –  The Limits of Control, a new exhibit at Gallery Arcturus, explores the growing significance of barriers and walls restricting the movement of people ... migrants, demonstrators and minorities. Paintings and sculpture are brought together into an installation which takes the viewer inside the barriers objectively, with compassion rather than anger and also proposes a surprising possibility for overcoming the limits of control.

 

Artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris was a media witness to the mass migration of undocumented children walking across Mexico to the American border. The act of painting this scene helped her to move off the couch and into the experience. This led her to research many of the walls built at different times and in different places, not from a political point of view but as a physical, structural entity which can be sensed and which provokes submission but also calls us to move.

 

In the entry gallery Harris has corralled sculptures by Inuit artist Floyd Kuptana with a single strand of rope as an example of how a divide is not only something of stone or cement. Harris has also painted a city corridor to remind us of our own direct experience of being corralled, riding the subway, walking, driving downtown. This is not a show about 'us and them'.

 

What is on the other side of the wall? The open sky is above, but what is beyond is not revealed. "When we risk moving beyond our familiar with all its comfort and discomfort, we enter into the unknown," says Harris. "This work is about the fortress and the daring possibility of leaping."

 

There are several videos with music and images depicting individual works from this show at the Gallery Arcturus YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GalleryArcturus

 

 

-- 30 --

 

Please contact the gallery for more images. 

Slideshow:  http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-09-11-the-limits-of-control

Reception: Saturday, October 18, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Exhibit can be viewed through November 1, 2014

Regular gallery hours:Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

Exhibition

Toronto –  The Limits of Control, a new exhibit at Gallery Arcturus, explores the growing significance of barriers and walls restricting the movement of people ... migrants, demonstrators and minorities. Paintings and sculpture are brought together into an installation which takes the viewer inside the barriers objectively, with compassion rather than anger and also proposes a surprising possibility for overcoming the limits of control.

 

Artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris was a media witness to the mass migration of undocumented children walking across Mexico to the American border. The act of painting this scene helped her to move off the couch and into the experience. This led her to research many of the walls built at different times and in different places, not from a political point of view but as a physical, structural entity which can be sensed and which provokes submission but also calls us to move.

 

In the entry gallery Harris has corralled sculptures by Inuit artist Floyd Kuptana with a single strand of rope as an example of how a divide is not only something of stone or cement. Harris has also painted a city corridor to remind us of our own direct experience of being corralled, riding the subway, walking, driving downtown. This is not a show about 'us and them'.

 

What is on the other side of the wall? The open sky is above, but what is beyond is not revealed. "When we risk moving beyond our familiar with all its comfort and discomfort, we enter into the unknown," says Harris. "This work is about the fortress and the daring possibility of leaping."

 

There are several videos with music and images depicting individual works from this show at the Gallery Arcturus YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GalleryArcturus

 

 

-- 30 --

 

Please contact the gallery for more images. 

Slideshow:  http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-09-11-the-limits-of-control

Reception: Saturday, October 18, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Exhibit can be viewed through November 1, 2014

Regular gallery hours:Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

the limits of control 160 the limits of control Vivian Felsen deborah harris Floyd Kuptana

Neil Fox

Sat Jul 9 00:00:00 2011

Psalms of Renaissance

Neil Fox

Neil Fox has more than 30 years of experience in the photographic arts and has been recognized internationally for his innovation in the field.  He has been teaching photography for 20 years and has owned and operated a professional photography studio and laboratory for more than 12 years.

He is known as a pioneer and master of the technical aspects of photography and image reproduction.  Neil designed the world’s first microprocessor for the lighting equipment used by professional photographers.  He also acted as a consultant for the development of screenless printing which is now more commonly known as Stochastic printing.

Neil continues to shoot as a professional photographer with a very diverse base of clients.  The outstanding feature of his work is his dedication to quality.  His concern for achieving the highest possible standards of reproduction and permanence led him to the renowned Dye Transfer process in 1972.  Through many years of painstaking effort, he mastered this difficult and rarely used technique and in the process has become a gifted colourist.

In 1984, feeling a change was needed in his career, he and his family packed up the business and moved to Jerusalem where they lived and he photographed for the next three years.  Neil and his wife Barb were attracted to this timeless land by the radical transformations that were taking place.  They were drawn to support these transformations in his photography and the message of hope and rebirth that could be communicated through these images.  Psalms of Renaissance came from this period.

For the past twelve years Neil has been a faculty member in the Creative Photography Program at Humber College in Toronto.  During this time he has written six manuals on photography, co-ordinated the development of the Humber program and completed Psalms of Renaissance.

 

http://www.neilfoximages.com/tag/photography-2/

Artist

Neil Fox Neil Fox

Nothing Other

Tue Mar 5 00:00:00 2002

 

The Artist,  E.J.Gold

E.J. Gold is a master artist.  His proficiency extends into many artistic media, including painting and sculpting as well as professional video and music recording, computer game writing, and virtual reality wizardry.  Gold has created a diversified and monumental oeuvre in the course of the forty years of his career as an artist.  All his work speaks of breathtaking vision, technical expertise, uncompromising discipline, and engaging humor.

E.J. Gold was born in New York City in 1941.  As the son of H.L. Gold, the editor of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, he grew up surrounded by artists and intellectuals, the Who’s Who in the Arts in America of the 40's and 50's: Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Charles Laughton, Orson Welles, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Pete Seeger...

The New York School, Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, Rico Lebrun and Fritz Schwaderer are among his early influences.  A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, he was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.

Gold is a perceptual scientist who uses art as his primary investigative tool.  He is the principal author of the Manifesto on Reductionism published jointly with the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artistic enclave at the cutting edge of experimentation in objective art where visual elaboration is reduced to a minimum.  In keeping with the tenets of reductionism, instead of drawing on personal elements of past experience, the artist directs his attention to the world of stillness and silence that lies just on the other side of the veil.

Gold’s work often violates scale, at once denying dimension and perspective.  By making use of color, form, texture, negative space, forced perspective, compressions, color field and figure-ground relationships, Gold depicts the world beyond the boundaries of space and time, portraying timeless eternity.

Some of Gold’s more well-known series of paintings include the Faces of War, PlanarContiguities, Odalisques, Guides, Moonbeam, White House Series, Expressionist Landscapes, Sanitarium Series, Angels, Monumentals, Haunted Corridors, and City in the Sky.

These powerful paintings by this remarkable shamanic artist are gateways to sublime mystical experiences.  They are profoundly experiential and impenetrable by the mind but have the ability to awaken higher centers.  Therein lies their key.

 

Della Heywood

Born in Vancouver, Della’s primary interest from early childhood was art.  She attended the Emily Carr School of Art and Capilano College where she studied a variety of artistic mediums.  In her development as an artist, Della was influenced by the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and the Surrealists.  This is revealed in her love of light, intensity of colour and appreciation for dream-like realities.  Her paintings document her quest to strip away habitual cognition and enter into the magical world behind and within ordinary perception.  Della currently lives in California and has become one of the most accomplished members of the School of Reductionism.

 

Kelly Rivera

Born in Puerto Rico, she studied art and theatre at the University of Maryland and then move to New York City where she worked professionally in both mediums.  Rivera considers Rico Lebrun, Tom Johnson and E.J. Gold as having had the greatest influence on her work.  She also has been inspired by tantric art in its use of colour and stylization.  In her most recent works, we can see references to the symbolist and Pre-Raphaelite imagery of Dante Gabriel Rossetti.  She uses art as a “means to access a world that is usually unseen”.  Many of Rivera’s works are influenced by her vivid dreams, past and present.  She has been a member of the School of Reductionism for 12 years.

 

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

Exhibition

Nothing Other Nothing Other E.J. Gold Della Heywood Kelly Rivera

Kelly Rivera

Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 2011

Born in Puerto Rico, she studied art and theatre at the University of Maryland and then move to New York City where she worked professionally in both mediums. Rivera considers Rico Lebrun, Tom Johnson and E.J. Gold as having had the greatest influence on her work. She also has been inspired by tantric art in its use of colour and stylization. In her most recent works, we can see references to the symbolist and Pre-Raphaelite imagery of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. She uses art as a “means to access a world that is usually unseen”. Many of Rivera’s works are influenced by her vivid dreams, past and present. She has been a member of the School of Reductionism for 12 years.

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artists' community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

http://www.anessentialartist.com/

Artist

Kelly Rivera Kelly Rivera

To Do or Not

Sat Nov 24 00:00:00 2001

Saturday, November 24, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

January 8 - February 9, 2002

Opening Reception:  Saturday, November 24, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

Toronto … is the impulse behind a work of art true enoughto do the work?  This is the theme explored in to do or not ..., a new solo exhibition of collage and paintings by artist-in-residence deborah harris at Gallery Arcturus. 

“My experience with seeing in the medium of collage is that my eye is drawn to what reminds me of moments of attention.  In recollecting colour, line, movement, light and dark I find a relationship between them, a harmony which describes and amplifies these moments.  The ecstatic part of this process is that it is possible to find the duplication of the patterns of colour, line and movement in every form, removing the notion of separateness and affirming a relatedness that simply is, if only we can see,” says deborah harris.  

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that this exhibition has a number of unique elements.  “In the west gallery, 99 works of collage have been reproduced in the same size and organized spatially as a continuous line of imagery to provide an insight into the artist’s vision.  In the east gallery, the patterns of these perceptions are expanded on canvas and board to explore the gestures implied in the collages.”

As part of this exhibition Gallery Arcturus will make available deborah’s previous works and angel series in card and print format.

Exhibition

January 8 - February 9, 2002

Opening Reception:  Saturday, November 24, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

Toronto … is the impulse behind a work of art true enoughto do the work?  This is the theme explored in to do or not ..., a new solo exhibition of collage and paintings by artist-in-residence deborah harris at Gallery Arcturus. 

“My experience with seeing in the medium of collage is that my eye is drawn to what reminds me of moments of attention.  In recollecting colour, line, movement, light and dark I find a relationship between them, a harmony which describes and amplifies these moments.  The ecstatic part of this process is that it is possible to find the duplication of the patterns of colour, line and movement in every form, removing the notion of separateness and affirming a relatedness that simply is, if only we can see,” says deborah harris.  

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that this exhibition has a number of unique elements.  “In the west gallery, 99 works of collage have been reproduced in the same size and organized spatially as a continuous line of imagery to provide an insight into the artist’s vision.  In the east gallery, the patterns of these perceptions are expanded on canvas and board to explore the gestures implied in the collages.”

As part of this exhibition Gallery Arcturus will make available deborah’s previous works and angel series in card and print format.

To Do or Not To Do or Not deborah harris

A Relentless Eye

Sat Sep 22 00:00:00 2001

 

Review

William Caldwell

by Gary Geddes

We have art in order not to die of the truth.  These words of Nietzsche haunt me.  They do not speak of art as a means of escape, but rather as a way of giving the most grim and chaotic reality shape and meaning, so that we might, at least, endure it, or, at best, triumph over it.  Through the artist with his urge for order, such redemption as there is becomes possible.

Conrad once described Henry James as a ‘historian of fine consciences’.  He was thinking of that tribe of cultured and sophisticated characters parading back and forth in James novels between American innocence and European experience.  Where James only hinted at the baser motives beneath the veneer of manners, Conrad imaged those emotions powerfully in his work – greed, racism, lust, murderousness.  His feet were firmly planted in the European tradition, with its wars and betrayals and mass exterminations, where, as he said, the celestial city is not only far from being built, but also does not even have the ground for its construction cleared of the brush.

Conrad belonged to the great tradition of moralists, in which I find painters such as Bosch, Hogarth, Goya, Francis Bacon and William Caldwell.  Such painters offend us and scare us with their brutal honesty, their depiction of our deepest and coarsest actions and motivations: the cruelty and tyranny at the root of our domestic relationships, which is writ large in our commercial and political structures and behaviour.  Such confrontations send us in search of more comfortable visions.  The shock of recognition is too great.  Faces emptied of all but the most elemental emotions.  No prettiness, no fashions, no endearing landscapes, no vocabulary of pleasant colours, no language of elegant rationalization.  Creatures naked and exposed, a hundred Belsens in our brains, a thousand Hiroshimas in our hearts.

Canadians are not ready for the work of William Caldwell.  God knows, we need it.  Dead Indians, dead lakes, dead expressions, dead dreams.  When we cannot face reality, we adopt the terminology of slaves – free love, free trade, free form.  Who is there among the community of artists, critics, statesmen who will dare to face Caldwell’s terrible vision, his austere charcoal and chalk, his dreadful economy of line and colour, and find there the honesty and beauty that might still redeem us, make us human again?

Exhibition

A Relentless Eye A Relentless Eye William Caldwell

William Caldwell

Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 2011

William Caldwell

1928 - 1998

William (Bill) Caldwell, called Mack by his wife, was born in Mimico, then a small community west of Toronto. Both his parents came from old established families in Oshawa, and during the 1920s moved to Mimico where David William Caldwell opened pharmacies.

The Second World War took the family to Ottawa, where his father was seconded to Defense Headquarters to head the Tri-Medical Services. As a child, and then later as a youth, Bill was never comfortable in a regular classroom. He left the prestigious University of Toronto Schools after Grade 9, attended the Western Technical School in Toronto for one year, and then went to Ottawa Technical High School where he spent one semester.

He joined the army in 1948, rising from the position of sapper in the Engineers to 2nd lieutenant in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, although his favorite position was sergeant. After a few years he resigned his commission at London, Ontario, and with no formal training opened a design studio for home and office furniture and interiors, and commercial graphics work.

A family request to return to Oshawa began the next phase of his life. He continued his designing career but in 1966 became increasingly aware of the need for an art gallery in that city. He therefore closed his office to further requests, completing only what work he had in progress, and devoted the next  year to the establishment of the Art Gallery of Oshawa (presently the Robert McLaughlin Gallery) in 1967.

By 1970 the urge became overwhelming to leave designing and begin a new life as an artist in his own right. He and his wife Lorraine loaded a van and left for Newfoundland, the farthest place in Canada from the old centres of his past.

They settled in the outport of Rocky Harbour, but their four and a half years there was not idyllic. The cruelty of the climate and place was intertwined with Bill's struggle to establish his drawing and painting skills. As local residents became his subjects, they revealed their own problems, stimulating the empathy that continued to mark the rest of his career.

Again, a variety of needs outgrew place and Lorraine was sent to find a suitable site for Bill to build another studio. She found a small house and adjoining blacksmith's shop in Watson's Corners in Lanark County. Before they left Newfoundland, he destroyed thousands of drawings as inadequate. But he discovered in Newfoundland that he was truly an artist.

After a year of construction in Watson's Corners, he began to paint the large canvases that drew on his social concerns. These he developed from preliminary portrait studies, which he would fan out on the studio floor. He invited many people to sit as subjects, as he was always alert for fresh visual and psychological material. Not everyone was comfortable under his scrutiny, but many later admitted that their experience in the studio had changed their lives. From this period there are thousands of large and small drawings, dated and filed in envelopes and boxes.

He always searched for truth and moral fortitude both in himself and through his art. He confronted bureaucrats over substandard housing in Rocky Harbour; in the modern sales space of the Balderson Cheese factory in Lanark County, he placed beams from the barns and milk-houses of the original farmer-owners of the cheese cooperative; he planned a road bypass to divert heavy mining trucks around the heart of Lanark Village. He kept on with these efforts, even as he involved himself in debates and correspondence about social responsibility, with both government departments and leaders in the private sector. Sadly, despite his own best efforts and those of others, it was always difficult for him to find a way of affecting the issues he held most dear.

Exhibitions, 1970s-1990s

Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa

Edward Monagham, Ottawa

Sedun/Kanerva Architects, Toronto

Gallerie l'Autre Equivoc, Ottawa

Delaplaine Visual Arts Center, Frederick, Maryland

Private Collections

Canada, United States of America, United Kingdom

Publication Work

Cover, The Canadian Medical Association Journal (January 1, 1985)

Cover, One Night at the Indigo Hotel, Robert Allen (1986)

Artist

William Caldwell William Caldwell

Being Witnessed

Sat Jun 16 00:00:00 2001

Saturday, June 16, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

‘Be’

the demand of the creative.

‘I will’

the agreement to accept

the consequence of being.

The work is the call

to remember that agreement.

In remembering

we are beheld and beholden.

-deborah harris

 

 

 

"being witnessed"

to enter a process

to participate in a process

to do the work

impossible

impossible not to get wet if you stand in the rain unprotected

wet paint everywhere

impossible to get it off after it dries
still

what is possible

what is

here now

being witnessed

the spaciousness of question that is not confined to answer

but is willing to receive impressions

to expand experience

a shared process.

-deborah harris

 

 

"The Asking"


I saw you in prayer--
sitting still and crouched,
making a request with some reverence,
some timidity and formality,
asking the Heavens for rain,
for protection or good health.

But you have not the etiquette of prayer
to guide you as you stand at
moment's attention.
In your posture, your speech,
it is raw temerity you exhibit
in this one small way;
running through an invisible vein when you are asking,
as you always are.

And sometimes
it builds to such a pitch,
with extraordinary urgency,
around a pinpoint axis,
swirls your energy,
your being,
piercing
and lethal if you chose to make it so.
for I wonder whether
I also have a question.

If you watch the cattle grazing
from the window upstairs,
sometimes you see their necks arch
questioning the sky,
straining so clearly
to make that request
that powers their hooves
and feeds their children.

This is the question.
It is beyond prayer.
There is no response,
no absolution
--only the asking.


-Julia

 

Review: 'self absorbed'


...she said it as a criticism of the 'so called' artists work, as an accusation... self absorbed into what; self absorbed with what intention? ... as a cause or as an effect? ... to what purpose can I absorb myself; the impressions that enter self to nourish being. self absorption, not to maintain separateness, but as means to connectedness.

Self: the individual as an object to his own reflective consciousness.

Absorb: to take in as a sponge.

Sponge: a name given to a class of animal growths belonging to the Protozoa, also to the framework or skeleton of these bodies which are composed of horny elastic fibers, soft, light, and porous, easily compressible, readily imbibing fluids and as readily giving them out again upon compression.

Fluid: Capable of flowing or moving like water: liquid or gaseous - a body whose particles on the slightest pressure move and change their relative position without separation; the state of being fluid.

Compression: Pressed into a narrow compass; the act of forcing into a closer union or density; the state of being compressed.

Compass: A passing round; a circular course, limit or boundary; extent; range; applied to time, space, sound etc. an instrument consisting essentially of a magnet suspended so as to have as complete freedom of motion as possible, and used to indicate the magnetic meridian or the position of objects with respect to that meridian.

Exhibition

Being Witnessed Being Witnessed deborah harris

Openings

Sat Apr 28 00:00:00 2001

Saturday, April 28, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Exhibition, Group Show

Openings Openings

Gesture in Black

Sat Feb 10 00:00:00 2001

Review:

Arcturus Gestural Treasures

Art Gallery offers up new classical experimental works

by Donna Lypchuk

March 18, 2001

Tucked away in a Heritage Home between renovated warehouse buildings at Church and Gerrard you will find Gallery Arcturus – a non-profit exhibition space dedicated to contemporary art.  Funded by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art, this pleasant, well-lit space is an off-beat and charming surprise considering that it is located so far away from the galleries clustered along Queen Street and Yorkville.

Currently on display are two very interesting shows, which fall into the category of what I would call “classic experimental” art.  Both exhibitions were put together by Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo, with an eye to educating both students and the general public about the often misunderstood genre of gestural art.  You can see gestural drawings and painting anywhere in any gallery in Toronto, but rarely do you see it done well.

E.J. Gold, Gesture in Black

One space is devoted to a series of charcoal drawings by American artist E.J. Gold.  A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, Gold’s main claim to fame were his “soft and breathing sculptures”.  This solo exhibit called Gesture In Black features a series of line drawings – all portraits done in charcoal of women’s heads.

This tight, glossy show of 14 works clearly demonstrates the Reductivist approach to drawing: stark and spontaneously drawn lines are used to express the subtleties of mood and character.  Anyone who is interested in gestural drawing will definitely benefit from taking a look at this show.  The first seven works have a flair about them that reminds me of Matisse.

These works are very minimalist and rely on the blankness of the paper to express depth and definition.  In a drawing such as “Matador”, for instance, the artist uses very few strokes of charcoal to express the sly character of a man hiding behind a cape. 

The second seven works in the show are more cubist in style.  Several of the works raucously rape the style of Picasso complete with asymmetrical eyes, bullish noses and trapezoid-shaped faces.  This is one of the best appropriations of Picasso’s truncated cartoonish perspectives that I have ever encountered in a gallery, and is not surprising coming from such a creative chameleon such as Gold who has created thousands of paintings, drawings and sculptures since the sixties.

He is also one of the few artists who can pull this off with authenticity, as he was part of the retro-cubist movement that was all the rate back then and is becoming all the rage again.

Deborah Harris, Angels in Procession

In the second gallery, art teacher and Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris presents 10 large gestural portraits called Angels in Procession.  Created largely from oil and collage, curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each Christmas for the past 10 years Deborah has, in her own words, been delivered an angel.”

These figures emerge in the form of a collage each with its own unique posture and character.  The works in this show range from the figurative, such as her bloody and brownish portrait of a red angel squatting with her back to the viewer to the completely abstract, such as her portrait of a greenish angel, who emerges merely as a pair of eyes in a lime green colour field.

One astounding collage features the angel completely splintered and fragmented into landscape filled with body parts, and yet another features an iconic angel, kneeling and coloured with the classic golds and browns you would find in a traditional religious painting.

This exhibition represents a very earnest attempt to detail the elusive nature of otherworldly spirits.  Unlike Gold’s show, it is not very cohesive or united by a singular purposeful style.  However, that is what is unique about it.  Harris shows how the content of a painting can dictate its style, as opposed to being dictated by the eccentricities or limitations of the talent behind it.

Both of these exhibitions offer the viewer a lot of food for thought about how gesture can be used to create portraits.  Ultimately, both artists fragment and reduce their subjects to find an essence: one using a few broad strokes and the other using collage.  Both are extremely well-versed when it comes to expressing spontaneity and authenticity in their visual language.

This is refreshing in a gallery scene full of uninspired mimics who can’t grasp the importance of gesture.

Exhibition

Gesture in Black Gesture in Black E.J. Gold

angels in procession

Sat Feb 10 00:00:00 2001

 

Notes

angels of christmas past and present

Torn fragments of a thousand images

the pallette of collage and sometimes angels

For the past ten year ends’

I have ‘received’ angels

the surprise of them    the gift of them

became the gift I gave to my family and friends

and they in turn from them to theirs

It is the way I have touched people with my work

the way I am able to acknowledge those whose care I receive

the way I connect work to people.

This last year, as ‘artist-in-residence’, I have been given the space

and permission to devote myself to work.

It is an extraordinary privilege and obligation to meet that challenge.

Painting the angels at this time is the only way I know to return

my thanks to you.

 

deborah harris

November, 2000

angels in procession

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

February 10 - April 14, 2001

Toronto … Ten angels, each expressing a different

gesture which evokes the year it was conceived by

artist-in-residence deborah harris.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each

Christmas for the past 10 years deborah has, in her

own words, been delivered an angel.  These figures

emerge in the form of collage, each with its own

unique character and posture which evoke the spirit

of the year to come.  This year, she has undertaken to

paint these angels with oil on canvas”. 



Harris says that these angels were the gifts she

“received” for Christmas and, in turn, they were the

gifts she gave to family and friends, who in turn

gave them to theirs.  “This is the way I have

touched people with my work, the way I am able to

acknowledge those whose care I receive.”

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were

close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world

through the small weave of curtains, the play of light

and shadow in reflected images, windows and

doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability

to expose larger truths through close-up detail

continues to characterize her work.  She is also a

teacher at the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I

believe art is born out of an obsession to find order

inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves

because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris

says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her

struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as

she says,  to wholeness.

Exhibition

angels in procession

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

February 10 - April 14, 2001

Toronto … Ten angels, each expressing a different

gesture which evokes the year it was conceived by

artist-in-residence deborah harris.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each

Christmas for the past 10 years deborah has, in her

own words, been delivered an angel.  These figures

emerge in the form of collage, each with its own

unique character and posture which evoke the spirit

of the year to come.  This year, she has undertaken to

paint these angels with oil on canvas”. 



Harris says that these angels were the gifts she

“received” for Christmas and, in turn, they were the

gifts she gave to family and friends, who in turn

gave them to theirs.  “This is the way I have

touched people with my work, the way I am able to

acknowledge those whose care I receive.”

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were

close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world

through the small weave of curtains, the play of light

and shadow in reflected images, windows and

doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability

to expose larger truths through close-up detail

continues to characterize her work.  She is also a

teacher at the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I

believe art is born out of an obsession to find order

inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves

because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris

says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her

struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as

she says,  to wholeness.

angels in procession angels in procession deborah harris

ANGELS OF CHRISTMAS PAST and PRESENT

Sat Dec 9 00:00:00 2000

Saturday, December 9, 2:30 - 5:30 pm

 

Notes

angels of christmas past and present

Torn fragments of a thousand images

the pallette of collage and sometimes angels

For the past ten year ends’

I have ‘received’ angels

the surprise of them    the gift of them

became the gift I gave to my family and friends

and they in turn from them to theirs

It is the way I have touched people with my work

the way I am able to acknowledge those whose care I receive

the way I connect work to people.

This last year, as ‘artist-in-residence’, I have been given the space

and permission to devote myself to work.

It is an extraordinary privilege and obligation to meet that challenge.

Painting the angels at this time is the only way I know to return

my thanks to you.

deborah harris

November, 2000   

 

 

Review

Arcturus Gestural Treasures

Art Gallery offers up new classical experimental works

by Donna Lypchuk

March 18, 2001

Tucked away in a Heritage Home between renovated warehouse buildings at Church and Gerrard you will find Gallery Arcturus – a non-profit exhibition space dedicated to contemporary art.  Funded by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art, this pleasant, well-lit space is an off-beat and charming surprise considering that it is located so far away from the galleries clustered along Queen Street and Yorkville.

Currently on display are two very interesting shows, which fall into the category of what I would call “classic experimental” art.  Both exhibitions were put together by Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo, with an eye to educating both students and the general public about the often misunderstood genre of gestural art.  You can see gestural drawings and painting anywhere in any gallery in Toronto, but rarely do you see it done well.

E.J. Gold, Gesture in Black

One space is devoted to a series of charcoal drawings by American artist E.J. Gold.  A member of the infamous California Nine, a guerilla artist group of the sixties, Gold’s main claim to fame were his “soft and breathing sculptures”.  This solo exhibit called Gesture In Black features a series of line drawings – all portraits done in charcoal of women’s heads.

This tight, glossy show of 14 works clearly demonstrates the Reductivist approach to drawing: stark and spontaneously drawn lines are used to express the subtleties of mood and character.  Anyone who is interested in gestural drawing will definitely benefit from taking a look at this show.  The first seven works have a flair about them that reminds me of Matisse.

These works are very minimalist and rely on the blankness of the paper to express depth and definition.  In a drawing such as “Matador”, for instance, the artist uses very few strokes of charcoal to express the sly character of a man hiding behind a cape. 

The second seven works in the show are more cubist in style.  Several of the works raucously rape the style of Picasso complete with asymmetrical eyes, bullish noses and trapezoid-shaped faces.  This is one of the best appropriations of Picasso’s truncated cartoonish perspectives that I have ever encountered in a gallery, and is not surprising coming from such a creative chameleon such as Gold who has created thousands of paintings, drawings and sculptures since the sixties.

He is also one of the few artists who can pull this off with authenticity, as he was part of the retro-cubist movement that was all the rate back then and is becoming all the rage again.

Deborah Harris, Angels in Procession

In the second gallery, art teacher and Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris presents 10 large gestural portraits called Angels in Procession.  Created largely from oil and collage, curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each Christmas for the past 10 years Deborah has, in her own words, been delivered an angel.”

These figures emerge in the form of a collage each with its own unique posture and character.  The works in this show range from the figurative, such as her bloody and brownish portrait of a red angel squatting with her back to the viewer to the completely abstract, such as her portrait of a greenish angel, who emerges merely as a pair of eyes in a lime green colour field.

One astounding collage features the angel completely splintered and fragmented into landscape filled with body parts, and yet another features an iconic angel, kneeling and coloured with the classic golds and browns you would find in a traditional religious painting.

This exhibition represents a very earnest attempt to detail the elusive nature of otherworldly spirits.  Unlike Gold’s show, it is not very cohesive or united by a singular purposeful style.  However, that is what is unique about it.  Harris shows how the content of a painting can dictate its style, as opposed to being dictated by the eccentricities or limitations of the talent behind it.

Both of these exhibitions offer the viewer a lot of food for thought about how gesture can be used to create portraits.  Ultimately, both artists fragment and reduce their subjects to find an essence: one using a few broad strokes and the other using collage.  Both are extremely well-versed when it comes to expressing spontaneity and authenticity in their visual language.

This is refreshing in a gallery scene full of uninspired mimics who can’t grasp the importance of gesture.

angels in procession

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

February 10 - April 14, 2001

Toronto … Ten angels, each expressing a different gesture which evokes the year it was conceived by artist-in-residence deborah harris

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each Christmas for the past 10 years deborah has, in her own words, been delivered an angel.  These figures emerge in the form of collage,each with its own unique character and posture which evoke the spirit of year to come.  This year, she has undertaken to paint these angels with oil on canvas”.

Harris says that these angels were the gifts she “received” for Christmas and, in turn, they were the gifts she gave to family and friends, who in turn gave them to theirs.  “This is the way I have touched people with my work, the way I am able to acknowledge those whose care I receive.”

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  She is also a teacher at the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, to wholeness.

Exhibition

angels in procession

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

February 10 - April 14, 2001

Toronto … Ten angels, each expressing a different gesture which evokes the year it was conceived by artist-in-residence deborah harris

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that “each Christmas for the past 10 years deborah has, in her own words, been delivered an angel.  These figures emerge in the form of collage,each with its own unique character and posture which evoke the spirit of year to come.  This year, she has undertaken to paint these angels with oil on canvas”.

Harris says that these angels were the gifts she “received” for Christmas and, in turn, they were the gifts she gave to family and friends, who in turn gave them to theirs.  “This is the way I have touched people with my work, the way I am able to acknowledge those whose care I receive.”

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  She is also a teacher at the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, to wholeness.

ANGELS OF CHRISTMAS PAST  and  PRESENT ANGELS OF CHRISTMAS PAST  and  PRESENT deborah harris

Visited by Chance - works by James LaTrobe

Sat Sep 17 12:00:00 2016

An exhibit of photographs and prose

on display from Saturday, September 17 to Saturday, October 1

 

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More work by James LaTrobe can be seen at http://dragonwhistle.ca/

 

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For more information about the reception for this show please see this page

genesis

Exhibition

Visited by Chance - works by James LaTrobe 320 Visited by Chance - works by James LaTrobe James LaTrobe

Given

Sat Oct 21 00:00:00 2000

Saturday, October 21, 2:30 - 5:30pm

GIVEN

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

October 21 – December 16, 2000

Opening Reception:  Saturday, October 21, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Toronto ... In the alchemical studio of deborah harris, collages become oil paintings, each a window on a state of being which cannot be claimed but must be Given.  Both paintings and collages are included in Harris’ new solo exhibit Given which opens on October 21st at Gallery Arcturus.

Harris is recognized as a leading proponent of collage which she has practiced for more than 20 years.  Increasingly she is using collage as a point of departure for paintings which explore the same themes and moods but with the expressive freedom of oils.  Gallery Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that all the paintings were produced in the last 60 days.  “The wide range of work  within such a short period of time is most unusual.”  The paintings explore moods ranging from her discovery of the death of her dog and soulmate, Rory (Rory … Ode), to a searing penetration of the way of reconciliation (reconciliation is a long word). “Each piece stands alone, a timeless passageway to a state uniquely its own, each a gesture that beckons its viewer down that passageway like a scent on the breeze from an unknown country,” says Stilo.

Harris will be continuing her artist-in-residence program during this exhibit at Gallery Arcturus.“Art is not just something that hangs on the wall.  It is a way of seeing and interacting with the world that is more easily demonstrated in progress than in a finished work of art,” says harris.

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  She is also a teacher at the  Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, to wholeness.

Exhibition

GIVEN

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

October 21 – December 16, 2000

Opening Reception:  Saturday, October 21, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Toronto ... In the alchemical studio of deborah harris, collages become oil paintings, each a window on a state of being which cannot be claimed but must be Given.  Both paintings and collages are included in Harris’ new solo exhibit Given which opens on October 21st at Gallery Arcturus.

Harris is recognized as a leading proponent of collage which she has practiced for more than 20 years.  Increasingly she is using collage as a point of departure for paintings which explore the same themes and moods but with the expressive freedom of oils.  Gallery Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that all the paintings were produced in the last 60 days.  “The wide range of work  within such a short period of time is most unusual.”  The paintings explore moods ranging from her discovery of the death of her dog and soulmate, Rory (Rory … Ode), to a searing penetration of the way of reconciliation (reconciliation is a long word). “Each piece stands alone, a timeless passageway to a state uniquely its own, each a gesture that beckons its viewer down that passageway like a scent on the breeze from an unknown country,” says Stilo.

Harris will be continuing her artist-in-residence program during this exhibit at Gallery Arcturus.“Art is not just something that hangs on the wall.  It is a way of seeing and interacting with the world that is more easily demonstrated in progress than in a finished work of art,” says harris.

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  She is also a teacher at the  Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos … we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, to wholeness.

Given Given deborah harris

Empty Vessel

Thu Sep 7 00:00:00 2000

Christopher Griffin

 

Artist Statement

In my extensive travels, language barriers have kept me from completely understanding new and foreign cultures and landscapes. This barrier has forced me to rely on visual cues and impressions to form my perceptions. As a result, I am able to re-examine my own society, environment and culture.

My recent journey to West Papua, Indonesia on the island of Papua New Guinea has been the most inspiring. As one of the last pristine environments left on earth, the Papuans offer a glimpse of what it means to be human: self sufficient, independent and free from the pressures of modern life. Sadly, this celebration of early man will disappear in our lifetime, directly because of outside influence.

The Papuans do not live in fear of their natural world. They drink from the rivers, breathe the air and eat food from the soil with no trepidation. In contrast, we of the western world are living with increasing fear of these basic necessities of life as we ourselves are poisoning them. Air, water, earth. We disregard and disrespect these building blocks of life at our own peril.

This exposure to a spiritual, fundamental existence has caused me to re-examine my own work. I have become more involved in the actual process of creating. I am allowing the accidental and unconscious to guide my work. I am having fun. Although, warning signals of impending environmental and cultural loss are hinted at or fully exposed in my paintings, this does not clash with the joy of creating and the joy of living. My intent is not to jump on a soap box, nor to ignore our grave global dilemmas, but to be able to communicate to the viewer just enough to allow them to come to their own similar interpretations.

 

EXHIBITIONS

2002   “Basic Stance”, Trias Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

2001   Ottawa Art Gallery Art Rental and Sales, Ottawa, Ontario

2001   “Grid”, Robet Langen Galllery, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario

2000   “Vessel”, Gallery Arcturus, Toronto, Ontario

2000   “Raven”, KOR Gallery, Kitchener, Ontario

2000  “Ten Dead Birds”, Rotunda Gallery, Kitchener City Hall, Kitchener, Ontario

2000   “Irian Jaya”, Cambridge Library & Gallery, Cambridge, Ontario

1999   “Mamberamo”, Esther Prangley Rice Gallery, Western Maryland College, Maryland

1999   “Mamberamo”, 431 King Street West, Toronto, Ontario

1998   “Symvolika”,  Oseredok Ukranian Cultural Center, Winnipeg, Manitoba

1997   “Newfoundland Shore”, Network Gallery, First Canadian Place, Toronto, Ontario

1997   “Selo”, Ukranian Canadian Art Foundation, Toronto, Ontario

1996   “People of Honduras and Guatemala”, Queen’s Quay Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

1995   El Sitio Gallery, Antigua, Guatemala

1995   Municipalidad Centro, Trujillo, Honduras

1995   Island Mountain Gallery, Wells, British Columbia

1994   Homer Watson Gallery, Kitchener, Ontario

1993   Erin Johnson, Denver, Colorado

1993   Here & Now Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2003   Small Works Trinity Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia

2000   Kitchener- Waterloo Art Gallery, Kitchener, Ontario

1999   Trinity Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia

1999   Ontario Society of Artists John B. Aird Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

1995   Insights Exhibition, Elora, Ontario

1994   Society of Canadian Artists John B. Aird Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

1993   Mississauga City Hall, Mississauga, Ontario

1993   Etobicoke City Hall, Etobicoke, Ontario

PUBLIC ART COMMISSION

2000   Millennium Thumbprints Bronze Sculpture, City of Kitchener City Hall

GRANTS AND AWARDS

2000   Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Assistance Grant

1999   Main Street Ontario Millennium Grant

1999   Gallery Arcturus Exhibition Award, Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition

GALLERY REPRESENTATION

Trinity Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia

Trias Gallery, Toronto, Ontario

Whistler Art Galleries, Whistler, B.C.

Deloney Newkirk Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Harbinger Gallery, Waterloo, Ontario

 

For recent information visit his web site at: www.christophergriffin.ca

EMPTY VESSEL by Christopher Griffin GALLERY ARCTURUS September 7 - October 7, 2000 Opening Reception: Thursday, September 7th, 5:30-8:30pm Toronto... The incompatibility of the natural and man-made worlds is made disturbingly clear in the large, powerful canvases of Empty Vessel, Christopher Griffin’s new solo exhibit at Gallery Arcturus. The exhibit was awarded to Griffin at the 1999 Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition. “Natural forms such as dead birds seem embarrassingly sensual and incongruous against the geometric background of the human environment with its grids and evenly spaced telephone poles,” notes Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo. “The sharp contrast between the conceptual perfection of the modern world and the curved irregular shapes of natural objects thrown up on its digital shore is made visceral by these oil paintings. Although the works are somewhat abstract, they constitute a powerful statement about the ecological consequences of human endeavor.” One of the works, “Ten Dead Birds #7", portrays a human figure which is large enough to dominate the landscape but is itself sketchy and unformed, suggesting that the human sponsor of the modern landscape has become caught in it and marginalized ... less real than the dead birds that symbolize the natural order. Toronto-born artist Christopher Griffin graduated from Sheridan College and once designed books for a major publisher. Since 1990, he has sketched and painted his way through Europe, Cuba, North America’s West Coast, Cape Breton, Central America, the Ukraine and Southeast Asia. From these journeys he has synthesized a unique style combining representational and abstract elements.

Exhibition

EMPTY VESSEL by Christopher Griffin GALLERY ARCTURUS September 7 - October 7, 2000 Opening Reception: Thursday, September 7th, 5:30-8:30pm Toronto... The incompatibility of the natural and man-made worlds is made disturbingly clear in the large, powerful canvases of Empty Vessel, Christopher Griffin’s new solo exhibit at Gallery Arcturus. The exhibit was awarded to Griffin at the 1999 Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition. “Natural forms such as dead birds seem embarrassingly sensual and incongruous against the geometric background of the human environment with its grids and evenly spaced telephone poles,” notes Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo. “The sharp contrast between the conceptual perfection of the modern world and the curved irregular shapes of natural objects thrown up on its digital shore is made visceral by these oil paintings. Although the works are somewhat abstract, they constitute a powerful statement about the ecological consequences of human endeavor.” One of the works, “Ten Dead Birds #7", portrays a human figure which is large enough to dominate the landscape but is itself sketchy and unformed, suggesting that the human sponsor of the modern landscape has become caught in it and marginalized ... less real than the dead birds that symbolize the natural order. Toronto-born artist Christopher Griffin graduated from Sheridan College and once designed books for a major publisher. Since 1990, he has sketched and painted his way through Europe, Cuba, North America’s West Coast, Cape Breton, Central America, the Ukraine and Southeast Asia. From these journeys he has synthesized a unique style combining representational and abstract elements.
Empty Vessel Empty Vessel Christopher Griffin

DANCE PASSAGES

Thu Sep 7 00:00:00 2000

Thursday, September 7th, 5:30-8:30pm

 

Review

An Artist Reclaiming The Dance

by Kalli Paakspuu

May, 1999

“Dance is dance.  For me it is about life.  I put the trees upside down which relates to the movement of the dancing.  I put the square ...a little window behind the background...to make a good composition.  Post modernist movement is unfinished work and unfinished images...” says Dara Aram, a painter who wakes up at 6:00am and paints until 6:00pm.

Alive with Aram’s brush strokes and streaked with colours of a floral garden in full bloom, dancers float, spin and arabesque in a central space.  Trees waft in the breeze upside down in a joyful and passionate abandonment of bare feet in gravity.  “People say you have to have inspiration to paint, but most of the time inspiration comes”, says Aram.  Thick swirls of colour fill and cake the canvas with a van Gogh-like energy.  Traditional Kurdish circle dances envelop the ballet form, making Aram’s feminine dancers a resistance movement to the forces that threaten the harmonious cycles of nature.

Around his studio are a number of paintings.  Always female, always barefoot – a homage to the peacemaker in the family.  But why are the trees upside down?  “Putting the trees upside down tells a different story,” Aram says.  He rejoices over the possibility that some people may like to hang the work upside down.

Aram says he paints from his subconscious and likens the process to that of building a house.  “I work mostly from feeling.  But still I am aware of what I do when I paint,” he says.  His works examine how dancers relate to nature.  The breeze in the trees flutters with an animated dance of rainbow acrylic which dries quickly so the original passion and inspiration of the artist does not dissipate.

The dance paintings are an evocation of peace and Aram’s Kurdish origins make him a channel to reclaim the dance in a nation without a folk dance pulse.  Will we listen to and feel what the artists in our midst reveal?

Exhibition

DANCE PASSAGES DANCE PASSAGES Dara Aram

Dara Aram

Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 2011

http://daraaram.webs.com/

Artist’s Statement

During my painting career, I have produced and experimented with figurative, abstract, landscape and installation techniques. The past subjects have included the Environment combining Children and Women’s oppressive struggles in various political situations. 

Following my graduation from the Suleymani Institute of Fine Arts in Kurdistan, I studied at the Ontario College of Art in Toronto. I have recently attended the Artist-Educator Foundation Course at the Royal Conservatory.

In past works I have used mixed media to portray human rights events; various metals to create installations, photo montage and acrylic paints; sculpture materials to build life-sized figures; Thick layers of textured, acrylic paints mixed with gel provide the background for my subjects. My search for meaning in past projects has found hope and inspiration in the motifs of Mesopotamian history and mythology.  Mesopotamia, from the Greek meaning “between two rivers,”  also known as the “Cradle of Civilization, clearly maintains a vital and crucial place in the destiny of humankind.  

 “My recent work is a continuation of the exploration of visual expression about the human relationship with others and with nature. These contemporary works reflect my daily views from my balcony overlooking the Toronto skyline….Mystical shadows and lines combined with the colorful sky formations and nature inspire these works….Watery images, dark misty horizons and whimsical forms fuel the soul’s imagination…Continuing with my former themes, I have incorporated abstracted forms of women in these recent paintings.  The works are simplified, depicting three main layers of strata floating with splashes of abstracted forms found amidst the horizon lines, orchestrating the history and music of time and the ever changing environmental landscape.

 Many of my most recent painting are inspired by my travels throughout Ontario and also by the views from my studio.  The colorful landscapes and the beautiful  light of the different seasons motivate me.  I combine the abstracted landscapes with human figures. Every place I see creates a different mood and inspiration for my work.  In these works, I depict how nature and the human form are inseparable”.

Artists, since time immemorial, have conveyed their message with images rather than logical, linear statements. In this series, my new works in progress attempt to portray a journey into the imaginary realms of the unconscious.  I hope that the mystical images, forms and environmental themes that are emerging in these paintings will serve as an inspiration to modern, industrialized man, who urgently needs to reconnect with his lost soul, a soul that lies languishing under the weight of our modern, cold, corporate world where profits and statistics reign supreme over the human spirit and the environment. 

Artist

Dara Aram Dara Aram

Sowelu

Sat Mar 11 00:00:00 2000

Saturday, March 11, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Media Release

SOWELU

by deborah harris

GALLERY ARCTURUS

March 11 - August 5, 2000

Opening Reception:  Saturday, March 11, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Toronto ... SOWELU, the new solo exhibit by Arcturus artist-in-residence deborah harris, invites participation in this “exhibition in progress” which includes not only her oil paintings, collages and drawings but also her interactions with the gallery space and visitors.

Gallery Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that SOWELU is not the usual display of works  finished in the artist’s studio and then hung in a gallery.  “Here, the gallery is also the studio.   Visitors will see the works evolve, making the artistic endeavour itself part of the installation.”

The exhibition includes large oil paintings on canvas on the theme of wholeness, the translation of Sowelu, one of the Norse runes used in ancient divination.  “In these paintings, wholeness results from penetrating objective spaces which create a response in those who touch them,”   says Stilo.

Harris has been appointed Gallery Arcturus’ first artist-in-residence, a new position created to make the artistic process more accessible to gallery visitors.  “Art is not just something that hangs on the wall.  It is a way of seeing and interacting with the world that is more easily demonstrated in progress than in a finished work of art.  My aim as artist-in-residence is to involve visitors in this process, which is a movement toward wholeness, for them and for me.  Wholeness is the ultimate objective of art but it cannot be achieved without the viewer,” says harris.  “The people who see this exhibit will also influence the work”.

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups – frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  Currently, she is a teacher and custodian of the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.  “I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos ... we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art – especially collage – is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, to wholeness.

Exhibition

Sowelu Sowelu deborah harris

Voices of the Ancestors

Thu Jan 13 00:00:00 2000

Saturday, January 15th, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

Review

Voices of the Ancestors

by Andrea Maguire

January 13 - March 4, 2000

When architects and engineers use the word “draughtsmanship” to describe their drawings, they are using a rather scientific concept to describe something called “line quality”.  Long before the invention of computers, draughtsmen and draughtswomen were judged on their ability to draw lines of machine-like uniformity.  Every line on a plan was scrutinized for itsline quality:  it had to be perfectly consistent in terms of thickness and weight, or degree of blackness.

Much confusion has resulted over the use of the word “draughtsmanship” in the visual arts, specifically drawing and painting, because here the word is used in a completely differentway.  In drawing and painting, portrayal of emotions is an important consideration, and the artist employs a variety of techniques to achieve this.  For example, variations in line thickness and weight, even broken lines, are often used to express various emotions.  A droopy line or shape, even if it doesn’t much resemble the original subject, may indicate sadness far more effectively than simply copying the subject verbatim.  Angular, jagged shapes and lines create tension, and the experienced artist exploits this whenever it’s appropriate.

So good draughtsmanship in the visual arts refers to something more than mere technical proficiency.  It indicates the artists’s ability to express what he or she wants to express, and this often means the talent and skill to communicate emotions.

In Voices of the AncestorsAndrea Maguire displays her excellent draughtsmanship to advantage.  Her drawings and paintings are monochromatic, or very nearly so, in some ways reminding me of the restrained usage of colour in traditional Chinese painting.  The work in this show is expressive through its simplicity and clarity of execution.

For example, the five drawings entitled “Elemental Drawings Series 1-5", each being 51"x35", are charcoal on paper mounted on canvas.  They are mainly large, simple corner compositions in which the charcoal appears to have been washed over with a wet brush.

The subjects might be birdmen or birdwomen whose outstretched wings or arms bleed out into the grey background.  In each composition the body has been built up of denser textures whereit is darkest in the family of tones.  This commands the viewer’s attention momentarily, only to have it soon fly off into the corner.  And because there is no horizon or reference of any kind to the external world, the figure always flies free.  The tonal variations creating these energetic arcs have been well handled, and are a fine example of expressive draughtsmanship.

Earth Witness, mixed media, 70" x 51.5" This large canvas is one of my two favourites in the show for its masterful accomplishment of the large figure which crouches down over the cool grey earth, ultimately melding with it. Above the figure is a light, warm grey background while the underside of the head and wings are bounded by orangey-brown regions which anchor the whole composition.

My second favourite work is Ancestor Series III, mixed media on paper, 70" x 51.5". A figure leaps into the upper left hand corner of the canvas.  The bright splash of yellow above the head pulls the eye strongly upward, reinforcing the shadowy figure’s exuberant energy. Slight colour is used throughout which helps amplify the central idea of the figure leaping into a void.

Prospero’s Gate, 29" x 21", was done with drypoint and charcoal on paper to suggest the feeling of an ancient gate.  The fine crosshatching technique of the drypoint contrasts with the softer tones of charcoal which appear to have been treated to a wet brush. This has given two different qualities of grey to the piece which was then framed under glass. There is one wire-frame sculpture of a headless bird hanging high on the gallery wall where you would expect a bird to be.  The wings have been affixed to the left and right of the frame, and the wire has been left untreated.  It casts a most intriguing shadow on the gallery wall.

Voices of the Ancestors reveals an assured head at the service of an open heart.

Fred Herscovitch

Toronto

January 22, 2000.

 

-- --

Media Release

VOICES OF THE ANCESTORS by Andrea Maguire

GALLERY ARCTURUS

January 13 - March 4, 2000

Opening Reception:  Saturday, January 15th, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto... Her work is quintessentially modern – large, abstract figures composed from paint, collage, wood and metal – but Andrea Maguire’s arresting new solo exhibition Voices of the Ancestors reveals “a raw, ancient dance reaching into the bones, the guts of the depths of the psyche”. 

Andrea Maguire is increasingly recognized as one of Canada’s major emerging talents with highly acclaimed exhibits in Chicago, Cleveland, New York and Toronto during the past two years.  Educated at the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Art, she has become one of North America’s pre-eminent interpreters of shamanism.  Hers is a highly personal search (“I dedicate my flesh, my blood to the evasive image”) but her aim is universal (“abstraction becomes the condition of possibility.  Form is withdrawn from Matter and the particular which has lost its meaning”).  As she notes, “passion and freedom are needed in this quest to touch the unnameable”.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo points out that Maguire’s work is much more than mere metaphor. “Her forms and figures are not symbols of the unconscious but rather stripped down, intensifiedvisual facts firmly based in sensation.  The viewer stands before the figure and feels the posture and movement of it, becoming with the artist a ‘vessel to embrace raw energy’ rather than a thinking subject”.  Stilo notes that Maguire’s works are devoid of the old paradigm of fantasy  and surrealism but offer “extra realism”, penetrating the present through the use of sensation-inducing textures and gestures which are timeless archetypes, voices of our ancestors.

Exhibition

Voices of the Ancestors Voices of the Ancestors Andrea Maguire

Andrea Maguire

Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 2011

Andrea Maguire was born in Toronto in 1955, and she still makes her home in the city.  A widely exhibited artist, her studies in mythology, psychology and meditation help her to explore the human psyche and create new ways of expression in this world of perpetual change.

With degrees from the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Art, Maguire has worked as a teacher (art and history) and as an illustrator.  She has exhibited in prestigious group shows since 1975, and more recently has presented her mixed media images in solo exhibitions in Toronto.  Two resoundingly successful group shows in New York earlier this year led to a place at the Monserrat Gallery in Soho.

Maguire’s reflective and meditative approach to her art is particularly in harmony with the spirituality of the ancient culture and sacred traditions that are still a vital part of Tibet today.  Deeply moved by her recent visit, her beautiful abstract images with their interplay of texture, colour and collage, evoke the poignant sensations and the raw ancient energy she found imbued in the long forbidden land.

http://www.andreamaguire.com/

Artist

Andrea Maguire Andrea Maguire

empty gallery

Fri Jul 18 00:00:00 1997

empty gallery empty gallery

Life in the Labyrinth

Thu Nov 4 00:00:00 1999

 

Media Release

A Voyager’s Guide to:

LIFE IN THE LABYRINTH

by E.J. Gold

GALLERY ARCTURUS

November 4 - December 24, 1999

Toronto... Most urban dwellers would recognize cityscapes as a kind of labyrinth we negotiate every day. In E.J. Gold’s new solo exhibition at Gallery Arcturus called Life In The Labyrinth, the artist explores a corresponding inner labyrinth of states and perceptions which we also move through during the day, largely unconsciously.

In his striking canvases and works on paper, Gold is our guide on a journey of shifting perceptions which evoke the emotional states we habitually visit or avoid in our life within this inner labyrinth. “These paintings are a kind of metaphysics of the ordinary,” says Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo. “As Gold sees it, we are continually moving our physical bodies through external spaces while our psyches move through their own subjective states; the interplay between them defines our reality which obscures and misinterprets the objective world, reducing it to the familiar. For E.J. Gold, the world is not what it seems but is rather a kind of dream in which we subjectively and habitually create the landscapes of our own experience. Gold’s intention in his work is to show us this layered existence so that we can become conscious participants...voyagers of an objective labyrinth far less limited than the one we know.”

Gold is not only a painter but also a writer. His views on the labyrinth are brilliantly expounded in his book “Life In The Labyrinth” published by Gateways.

His art is in the White House but E.J. Gold’s reputation is primarily among other artists, for his daring experimentation, his command of many media and his consummate technique. His spare, exacting treatments, stripped of non-essential detail and color, have spawned a new school of

art called Reductionism

 

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California. The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art. Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being. It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience. Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

 

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational. However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves. The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism. Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract. Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect. Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

 

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of time which contains the creative act itself. There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art. Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass. The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships. Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

 

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space. The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer. Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it. Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it. Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space. Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

-- --

More work by EJ Gold here and at hei-art.com

Exhibition

Life in the Labyrinth Life in the Labyrinth E.J. Gold

Psalms of Renaissance

Thu Sep 9 00:00:00 1999

Thursday, September 9, 5:30 - 8:30pm

 

Review

Neil Fox and his family spent three years in the Middle East, slowly and meticulously recording cycles of birth, maturity, death and rebirth in the Holy Land. Lugging a 65 pound MasterView camera with auxiliary equipment up and down treacherous slopes in blazing heat would have deterred most people, but Fox's dedication to his mission won out. Indeed, the results are far more than a triumph over the physical elements; in fact, the 67 collected works now showing at Gallery Arcturus represent a rare and almost extinct photographic process.

Many images in Psalms of Renaissance were created by means of the Dye Transfer Process, formerly named the Inhibition Process, which is essentially the same as the original Technicolor used in the motion picture industry. Kodak bought the rights and produced the material until 1998 when the Dye Transfer Corporation took over manufacturing. Currently Neil Fox is one of the few remaining Dye Transfer specialists in the world, and certainly the only one using this difficult technology in Canada.

The difficulty of the process is that it utilizes color separations, and tight registration is required to align the transparencies perfectly before printing the final product. Each small limited edition set demands over 100 hours of meticulous hand processing. Clearly, Fox is a master of the craft; the resulting images come together with Swiss precision. He uses a large format MasterView camera, with either - 8" x 10" or 5" x 7" Ektachrome film. These give Fox razor sharp negatives to work with. Perhaps the most painstaking part of the process takes place in the lab.

Neil Fox began taking pictures in Jerusalem in 1984, but these photos are the result of more than thirty years of photographic experience. The pictures have a degree of color saturation never seen before in any photographic process, without sacrificing the subtleties of tone in both light and shade. Unlike the fugitive colors employed in other photographic processes, dye transfer colors are permanent. This will elicit sighs of relief from collectors everywhere.

Another kind of print appearing in Psalms of Renaissance is the Giclee print. This is an example of very recent technology in color printing. The original photos are scanned digitally into a computer file where the image can be modulated and eventually printed with Endurochrome dyes on watercolor paper, (this being Fox’s choice). Giclee prints are well regarded for their high quality and permanence.

 

Psalms of Renaissance

The Banias River is the main tributary of the Jordan River, in this location Fox has used time lapse photography to capture the river’s nature, highlights that unfold like a bolt of grey blue silk, winding through the lush overgrowth. This is only one of the unforgettable photos in the exhibition.

Jericho Bougainvillea is a diagonal composition in which the upper triangle is crowded with sumptuous purple and red flowers contrasting nicely with the cool greens of foliage in the lower sector of the format.

In the Mappal Sa-ar a waterfall drips in fine lines amongst a profusion of textures. The tactile sensations of hard rock and soft fronds are almost palpable. For those of us who have been nearly desensitized by urban living, it's a pleasure to stand quietly in front of this image, drinking in the infinite variety of subtle patterns of unspoiled nature.

The rocks in Mappal Sa'ar Pond have been river-washed into an intriguing grouping where the light grey rocks stand out against a dark, sombre pool plummeting into deep reflections.

A large photograph entitled Jerusalem Jewish Quarter is a one point perspective of a laneway flanked by buildings composed of what appears to be fine-grained sandstone. Beautiful, soft light suffuses the tunnel-like vista whose distant steps ascend into highlight at the vanishing point.

For audacious originality, I choose Eucalyptus Bark. A close in view of a tree trunk becomes a daring abstract composition in which blue-violet patches of bark surprise me: until now, I have only known Eucalyptus by its silvery grey. This odd-coloured bark contrasts masterfully with warm rust areas, and near the top of this bold composition a small chip of bark glows out like a blue ember.

Jericho Hotel is a study in simplicity. Here a dusty pink window frame surrounds a light grey wrought iron grille. The zigzag of the smashed windowpane opens into blackness. The smooth stucco of the exterior wall has broken away in huge sheets, revealing rough masonry beneath it.

Soreq Valley presents us with burgundy-coloured Judas trees amongst myriads of greens. If we take the time it deserves, we may observe here the precision of detailing and subtlety of colour available to us though the Dye Transfer Process.

Latrun is an example of a Giclee print. In this fine photo, the soft composition in which the Jaffa Gate, also known as the Tower of Phasael, looms up into a blue sky which is darkening toward the top of the composition. Warm colours in the richly-coloured masonry are a foil to the heavens.

"Mount of Olives" is a study in cobalt blue of the cemetery commemorating the tombstones of three religions. Its very austerity is its real power.

Psalms of Renaissance is a lesson for all serious photographers, film makers and appreciators of superlative photography. It is not a lesson to be missed.

Fred Herscovitch
Toronto
September 27, 1999.

 

The Exhibit

Psalm: “sacred song” Renaissance: “rebirth”

The exhibit Psalms of Renaissance was first conceived by photographer Neil Fox in 1983. It is a celebration of rebirth of the Holy Land. No other land has been transformed in this manner; it is truly a miracle. This exhibit is a tribute to those who have contributed, and to the spiritual force behind them.

So compelling was the desire to create this exhibit that in 1984 he sold his studio and home, moving his entire family to Jerusalem. Psalms of Renaissance took three years to photograph and many more years to print. The artist set out for days at a time traversing the country in search of the images that conveyed the rebirth and revitalization of a nation and its past glory. The photographs came together in various fashions: some images were spontaneous and were taken as instantly as they occurred; others involved hours of patience waiting for the light and conditions to fall into place. Many required numerous visits back to the same location, hoping each time to find the conditions that would create the image that was in his mind.

All of the images in this exhibit were photographed with a large format Masterview camera on either 8"x 10" or 5" x 7" Ektachrome film. The camera, Rodenstock lenses, tripod and accessories, weighing in at over sixty-five pounds, were backpacked into many remote areas. At the conclusion of each photographic expedition, the film was hand-processed by the artist in Jerusalem for optimum quality. During the three years, over 2,500 images were taken and 71 have been selected for the Dye Transfer and Giclee prints in Psalms of Renaissance to express the artist’s view of the land and its rebirth.

The vivid and archival Dye Transfer prints that have been created for the exhibit have taken many years to complete. They have been produced in limited editions to the highest standards. The recent addition of Giclee prints gives the exhibit an added dimension; they are a joy to behold.

 

Dye Transfer Prints

For most of this century Dye Transfer Prints have been considered to be the finest of all colour reproduction. Unlike all other temporary colour photographic and graphic processes the Dye Transfer Process is archival.

The Dye Transfer Process is a photographic process involving multiple stages of hand separations, masking techniques, projecting to matrices, processing, dying and printing. A very complex series of skills are required to complete each print; and a full set of limited edition prints can easily exceed one hundred hours of meticulous hand work. Very pure dyes are used for this process which result in a saturation of colour and density richness unparalleled by any other. These dyes and the very stable fibre base paper give the Dye Transfer process its permanence.

The numerous stages afford a fine degree of control and requires a great deal of skill and experience.

True limited editions can be created with Dye Transfer Prints. The matrices from which the final dyes are transferred to create the final image can be re-dyed to create another print. However, due to their very fragile nature, the number of prints that can be made to very strict tolerances is usually only 15 to 30, creating a true limited edition. Once the edition is completed the matrices are destroyed. The prints are all numbered and signed in the order they are printed along with the printing date and the date of the photograph.

The Dye Transfer Process was originally called the Imbibition process in the 1920's and was essentially the same as the original Technicolor in the motion picture industry. Kodak bought the rights and produced the material until 1998 when the Dye Transfer Corp. assumed manufacturing. Currently Neil Fox is one of the few remaining Dye Transfer specialists worldwide and is unique in Canada.

 

The Presentation

The images for Psalms of Renaissance were selected from over 2,500 images photographed over a three year period. Only a fraction of these could be produced as limited edition prints.

Psalms of Renaissance consists of 54 Dye Transfer Prints and 17 Giclee Prints. The prints are presented in archival quality mattes and submattes that are specifically ph balanced for colour prints created with dyes, acid free, 100% rag. The materials have been very carefully selected for their permanence, quality and appearance. Each print is mounted using an archival tissue which is reversible and ph neutral.

Each image is labeled from left to right:

C      Print number: the order in which it was printed (+1 artist proof)

C      Edition number: the maximum number of prints from the setof matrices or the set limit.

C      Image title

C      Signature of artist

C      Date of image

C      Date of print

The finest materials have been employed to present Psalms of Renaissance.

The prints and their presentation materials are to museum standards.

Exhibition

Psalms of Renaissance Psalms of Renaissance Neil Fox

1999 Permanent Collection Exhibit

Tue Jun 29 00:00:00 1999

 

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

Exhibition

1999 Permanent Collection Exhibit 1999 Permanent Collection Exhibit E.J. Gold Della Heywood

Earth, Wind and Water

Sat May 1 00:00:00 1999

Saturday, May 1st, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

REVIEW / EARTH, WIND AND WATER


Earth, Wind and Water - paintings on silk by Yousha Lui

Yousha Lui was born in Zhejiang in 1960 where she studied Fine Arts, eventually mastering the art of painting on silk, and rising to the position of professor at Zheijiang Academy of Fine Arts. Her present work combines contemporary Western concepts with traditional Chinese approaches, resulting in a highly personal synthesis. Liu's work is characterized by elements - be they human figures, animals or vegetation - arranged in a very flat space. Colours are always soft and muted and they reside comfortably within the mid-range of values; that is, there are no very darks or lights. Women and children and animals float gently and rhythmically in a dreamy environment. Nothing is ever jarring or abrupt about Lui's work; it is always calming, and this fulfills one of the highest ideals of traditional Chinese art. The finished works have been mounted on stiff backings and tastefully framed.

One of my favourite pieces in the show is entitled Beyond the Mountains, ink and colour on silk, 28" x 32", 1998. Three highly simplified female forms float in a muted light-green space. The one at the top left of the composition is reaching up to pick green fruit from a branch dangling overhead. A second figure at the lower left sits on the ground looking leftward, while a third woman is running to the right, apparently juggling three fruits. Particularly intriguing is the pair of goats which are actually glowing, no mean accomplishment for a painting on silk. The artist has achieved this effect by skilfully playing off the brights against the dulls.  Like Water for Fish, ink and colours on silk, 18" x 22", 1999. Three pink figures are charmingly contrasted with a bouyant green umbrella. Lui's simplification of the human form handed down from master to pupil, generation after generation, and is always learned by rote. Yousha Lui's art honours and respects traditional Chinese values of tranquillity, simplicity and refined beauty while adding something from her own inner vision.

Fred Herscovitch
Toronto, May 14, 1999

 

 

Notes

Ancient Chinese Scholars, long before the invention of paper, painted on silk, drawing on basic themes; water, mountains, flowers and birds in natural settings. The few classical Chinese figure paintings which exist today exhibit a style that is simple, exquisite and unique.

At university, I was introduced to and impressed by Western art with its emphasis on anatomical realism and perspective whereas my Chinese art training had emphasized tranquillity, poetry and dreams. I try to interpret our busy, modern life, in terms of the seemingly contradictory one of peace and tranquillity as enshrined in the classical Chines paintings on silk. People, trees, mountains are universal symbols which remind us of our humanity and our relationship with the natural world.

Yousha Liu, 1999

 

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Media Release

EARTH, WIND and WATER

by Yousha Liu

GALLERY ARCTURUS

May 1 - June 5, 1999

Opening Reception:  Saturday, May 1st, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto...Female figures in immediate relationship with the natural elements come alive with startling freshness in the exquisite painted silks of classically trained Chinese artist Yousha Liu   in her new solo exhibit Earth, Wind and Water at Gallery Arcturus opening on May 1st.

Long before the invention of paper, Chinese artists painted on silk.  The basic themes were water, mountains, flowers and birds which captured the peace and tranquility of the ancient world and the primacy of nature.  “My Chinese art training emphasized the traditional values of tranquility, poetry and dreams”, says Yousha “but at university I was introduced to Western art with its emphasis on anatomical realism.  In these paintings, I bring these two different perspectives together.  My female forms are not the highly stylized figures of Chinese traditional art, they are more natural and more sensuous, but the simplicity of composition and natural settings echo the past”.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that Yousha’s work “has the motion and impermanence of modern painting but also the dreamlike, transparent quality of earlier forms.  The result is a sensation of airiness and vitality...these figures are very much alive even though the compositions are reductionist rather than realistic”.    

Yousha Liu was a 1998 winner of the Gallery Arcturus Toronto Outdoor Exhibition Award.

She also has won many awards in her native China including the bronze medal at the Sixth National Art Exhibition in Beijing.  Her work has been collected by the National Art Museum of China in Beijing, the National Museum of History of China, Beijing, and the National Academy of Fine Arts China, Hangzhou as well as by private collectors in Canada, US, Germany, Japan and China.  She now lives in Toronto.

Exhibition

Earth, Wind and Water Earth, Wind and Water Yousha Liu

Yousha Liu

Tue Jul 12 00:00:00 2011

Yousha Liu was born in Zhejiang, China.  She earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at China Academy of Arts in 1982 and her Master of Fine Arts degree at Georgia Southern University in USA, in 2001.

Yousha’s professional experience began as an assistant curator at the Art Center of Hunan Province (1982-1985), followed by a position as assistant professor at the Zhejiang Academy of Painting in China (1985-1991).  After her first solo show in Canada, Yousha relocated to Toronto and continued her creative life as an artist and art teacher (1991-1999).  She taught studio art at Georgia Southern University (1999-2002), Iowa State University in USA (2002-2004), and gave private lessons in Canada. Now Yousha has settled in Mississauga, Ontario pursuing her creative life as a full time artist, part-time teacher and volunteer for local art societies. She has been selected to serve on the committee for the Induction of Honourary Members of the Drawing Society of Canada, and vice-president of the Oakville Arts Association. 

Web site for Yousha Liu:  http://www.youshaart.com/

Artist

Yousha Liu Yousha Liu

Last Kiss

Sat May 1 00:00:00 1999

Saturday, May 1st, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

REVIEW / LAST KISS

Review Showing currently with " Earth, Wind and Water" is "Last Kiss", an exhibition of silver prints by the internationally known photographer Pamela Williams. These photographs of sculptures were taken in graveyards in Italy, Austria and France. William's reputation is amply justified, as this collection attests, for gathered here are some of the most beautiful and haunting black and white images I've seen in a long time. She has a discerning eye, bypassing the hackneyed and syrupy varieties of nineteenth century Romantic sculpture, and zeroes in on the unusual, the powerful and the authentically expressive. Often it takes a great artist to discover another great artist, especially the long-neglected ones, and this appears to be the case with "Last Kiss." Williams shows us overlooked treasures in places we would never think to seek out.

Every photo in "Last Kiss" is exemplary in terms of composition and lighting, and undoubtedly everyone will have their favourites. In my case it was more like trying to choose from a tray od superb quality chocolates - I know they were all delicious, but I could only eat so many!

So let me begin with the "Dreamer", taken in a cemetery in Milan. A closely-cropped fragment of a woman's head, the light-coloured stone contrasts starkly with an almost black background. The eyes look fuzzy and indistinct conveying the strange feeling of a mental face somewhere between two realities, the mysterious realm between life and death; unsettling, yet beckoning, like the pull of a magnet. "Garden" is a photograph of truly supernatural beauty which was taken in Protestant Cemetery in Rome. Seen from the rear is a seated woman looking into a deep, sombre brocade of trees and vegetation interspersed with tombstones. Williams' superb handling of tonal qualities is evident throughout the show, but in "Niche", taken in Passy Cemetery, France, the gorgeous contrasts of rusticated architectural masonry with velvety blacks and smooth lines of female drapery all combine to make an enticing banquet for the eyes.

In "Reflection", captured in Genoa, Italy, the expressive inward gesture of the downcast head is especially touching. Even the eyelashes have been lovingly and sensitively chiseled, not to mention the extraordinary treatment of the filigreed lace adorning the neck. Pamela Williams has looked deeply into the dark and there has seen the light.

Fred Herscovitch
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

 

Note

LAST KISS: More photographs of cemetery sculpture from Genoa, Vienna, Milan.

The title, Last Kiss, was inspired by the statue of a woman kissing a man on his death bed. Focusing on figures from the Italian cemeteries, these photographs were made in Italy, Austria and France. Sensous creatures, sleek with velvety dust, these statues are a passionate potrayal of late nineteenth-century European sentiment. Romantic, as well as spiritual, they represent death as something other thatn what we imagine it to be. Here death is cloaked in beauty, in the final tribute, the last kiss.

Pamela Williams, 1999

 

Biography

Last Kiss is Canadian photographer Pamela Williams’ second collection of cemetery photographs.  Her first book Death Divine, caught the imagination of the public and media.  A popular exhibit of her romantic, Parisian cemetery portraits toured North America.

Williams’ photographs are on the covers of Timothy Findley’s book Dust to Dust, Margaret Laurence’s Stone Angel, and Carole Corbeil’s In the Wings.  Her portfolio ran in the New Age Journal and Profiles.  Vision TV aired a special on Williams.

Williams, who lectures internationally on her work, was on CBC Radio’s Gabereau, Daniel Richler’s Big Life, Fashion TV, Bravo, and Canada AM.  Her photos are collected across North America.

Pamela Williams lives in Toronto and visits cemeteries around the world.

 

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Media Release

 

LAST KISS

by Pamela Williams

GALLERY ARCTURUS

May 1 - June 5, 1999

Opening Reception:  Saturday, May 1st, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto... Pamela Williams’ long awaited second collection of photographs of cemetery sculpture, Last Kiss, opens in Toronto as part of the Toronto Festival of Photography, Contact ‘99.  Opening May 1st at Gallery Arcturus, the show will tour nationally.

The Last Kiss collection focuses on figures from Italian cemeteries.  A passionate portrayal of late 19th-century European sentiment, these images are romantic as well as spiritual.  Here death is cloaked in beauty, in the final tribute, the last kiss.

Reviewer Robert Reid, in The Record, writes that Last Kiss is “hauntingly beautiful...erotically charged...breathtakingly sensual and highly accomplished...by extending a hand to death, Pamela Williams embraces life.  By paying homage to the deceased, she celebrates the mystery and passion of living”.

Last Kissis Canadian photographerPamela Williams’ second collection of cemetery photographs.  Her first book “Death Divine”, featuring Parisian cemetery portraits, caught the imagination of the public and media and the collection toured North America.  Her photographs are on the covers of Timothy Findley’s book “Dust to Dust”, Margaret Laurence’s  “Stone Angel” and Carole Corbeil’s “In the Wings”.  She lives in Toronto and visits cemeteries around the world.

Exhibition

Last Kiss Last Kiss Pamela Williams

Voice of Sophia

Thu Mar 18 00:00:00 1999

 

REVIEW / VOICE OF SOPHIA

Solo exhibition of paintings and drawings by Sophie Sonin at Gallery Arcturus, March 18- April 22, 1999

Once in awhile, Nature is lavish with the gifts she bestows upon an individual; such is the case with Sophie Sonin. At just 19 years of age she is beautiful, intelligent, and blessed with several talents. Those who recognize and value such attributes will be quick to mimic Nature herself, and heap praise and good wishes upon this deserving and talented artist. When we stop to read captions Sophie has provided for her artwork, it becomes evident that her creativity springs from a poetic sensibility, for the explanations are thought provoking, and, read in conjunction with her visual expression, lead us to consider other layers of meaning we may possibly have missed. Walking about the gallery makes it obvious that the artist is gifted, for she is able to paint in virtually any style or technique. This is all the more astonishing when we learn that she is completely self-taught, and has been painting since the age of four! Her enthusiasm leads her to give a great deal of herself, perhaps too much, for her ability to paint convincingly in so many styles often leads to conflicting approaches within a single canvas, and this tends to undermine the unity of her work. Employing too many techniques in a work of art, whether it is painting, sculpture, architecture or film, is a pitfall into which many artists fall. The net result is often confusion rather than clarification of the design. Sophie may wish to contemplate the timeworn but useful maxim that "less is more"; duly considered she may well go on to become a noteworthy figure in Canadian Art. This being said, I would like to write about some of the stronger works in the show. Inevitably, these are the ones in which the artist sticks to one mode of representation while employing a consistent brush technique, resulting in a unified design.

 Lenten Supper, oil on canvas, 36" x 30", 1997-98.
This is a beautifully painted still life of a fish in a basket. The focal point of the composition is a pair of lemons placed to the left of the basket, the glowing yellow fruit contrasting bravely with the muted palette of the painting. This basket, along with a brass plate and kerosene lamp, are arranged upon a heavily-carved wood table. Outside the window there is a dream-like touch, for five tiny white swans float on a blue lake at eye level! This unexpected view from the window contrasts strangely with the realistic treatment of the room's interior. Sophie has painted the textures of the various objects so convincingly that I could easily imagine myself feeling the cool, wet lustre of the fish scales, the burnished highlights on the brass plate and the deep grooves in the wood furniture. The composition is solidly constructed and well balanced.

Bishop Seraphim's Portrait, oil on canvas, 47.8" x 36", 1997.
A squat Russian Orthodox priest, dressed in grey from hat to shoes, sits on a muted red sofa. His eyes, glasses and beard are convincingly rendered. For the priest's tasseled beads, Sophie has mixed a more intense shade of red which balances the more subdued red values in the sofa. Bishop Seraphim is placed just to the right of centre, avoiding the obvious and monotonous positioning of the focal point at the dead centre. This sophisticated knowledge of composition is deftly enhanced by the artist's fine sense of balance not only of colour but also of shape. For example, the artist has created a little painting on the wall behind the priest's head in neutral greys which neatly picks up the grey in the foreground floor. This is another well- conceived and carried out design.

There are many canvasses in the show which hold out a dream-like quality to us. One is Annavie, oil on canvas, 36" x 48", 1998.


Annavie and another reclining figure are painted nude in a South sea paradise against a background of opulent colours and textures. Annavie's form is painted in smooth, classical chiaroscuro which depends upon a unidirectional source of light whereas the background is a flat play of textures and patterns quite independent of any light source. While each painting approach is beautifully handled, their disparity subverts the unity of the composition.

The same general comments apply to several other canvasses in the show such as Voice of Sophia, 56" x 42", oil on canvas, 1997-98. In the bottom right hand corner of Sophia's head grows out a long swan-like neck reminiscent of Modigliani. While it is painted in Classical chiaroscuro, the eyes have been exaggerated, the fingers as well; they are remarkably long and tapered and would probably be coveted by any musician. The portrait and hand are outlined with an aura of light, framed against a complex background. There is a swimming pool in which the water is composed of foam, blue bubbles and banners of light. This is handled abstractly while above the water line - in the top third of the painting - there are rectangles, circles and dotted lines as well as a three dimensional pyramid. These geometric shapes are done in hard edge and they are superimposed upon a textural field. A tangle of calligraphic lines suggesting an abstract fishing pole and fish are also superimposed upon the water. The graceful lines of the calligraphic forms attest to the artist's excellent neuromuscular coordination. These three painting styles - chiaroscuro, textural field and hard edge, while each is exemplary in execution - don't come together in the painting.

Sophie's ability to handle transparent effects can be seen in her treatment of the bubbles in "Redemption".

I admired greatly the painting titled Fear, 79.5" x 30", Oil on linen, 1996. In this canvas the artist has created a work of great luminosity because of its fluid and energetic brushwork which is especially noticeable in the legs of the seated figure. The orangy-red figure is clutching what appears to be a fireworks display, but actually it is "the tail of freedom". Sophie is capable of achieving awesomely realistic effects such as the bright red boxing gloves which hang from an illuminated globe fixture in Peace to the One who Comes, 40 " x 30" , Oil on canvas, 1997-98.


In this painting the head of the godmother holding a child has been " antiqued" by painting hairline cracks to make it resemble a badly aged museum masterpiece. The landscape background has also been carefully painted; however, the palette therein doesn't seem to relate to the bright red gloves.

 A Wedding Gift to My Mother, oil on canvas, 60" x 50" 1998-99.


Sophie has painted her parents affectionately; her mother's wistful expression is especially touching. Father is posed facing right while his eyes look leftward; mother faces left, but her eyes look rightward! This double paradox creates a sense of tension in the viewer. Rich background textures are created by piling up multicoloured dots. The patterned floor flows upward and merges with the wall patterns, eliminating the horizon of the room. In the background a pyramidical grouping of the seated figures; the stuffed animals are a tender allusion to childhood. In the background there is an arch with a view to a lake. A tiny white sailboat hovers at the horizon which is again placed at eye level, producing a curiously unreal effect.

Jesus Christ, pencil on paper, 12.5" x 9", 1996.
This is one of a series of remarkable drawings displayed in the basement of Gallery Arcturus, and is my personal favourite of the whole exhibition. Contours defining the head of Christ have been used imaginatively as points of departure for decorative patterns. For example, the pupils of the eyes have radial patters which become mandalas in themselves! Similarly, the regions forming the lips and the shapes above the eyebrows have been cleverly organized into elegant designs which reminds me somewhat of the art of our Pacific Northwest indigenous people. Sophie handles the linework masterfully - it is fluid, spontaneous and totally effortless. The term "great draftsmanship" has traditionally been used in painting and drawing as the artist's ability to express an idea or emotion competently and appropriately with the medium chosen. Sophie Sonin's portrait of Jesus is an example of great draftsmanship. I would be particularly intrigued to see what the artist would do with this study if it were used as a basis for a painting.

The Cloud, pencil in paper, 12.5" x 9", 1995.
A lovely shaded pencil technique is used to create a feathery portrait of a female head which is shown three-quarters to the left. This perfect handling of the medium does justice to the title of the drawing, for the hair becomes a nimbus of clouds and even the eyes are filmy. This imaginative handling of an ordinary pencil shows the artist at her best, and serves to illustrate what the great architect Frank Lloyd Wright once said" An artist's limitations are is best friends."

Sophie Sonin is an artist showing great potential and few limitations, and I look forward most eagerly to her next show.

Fred I. Herscovitch. B.Sc., B.Ed.
March 6, 1999
Toronto

 

Biography

Sophie Sonin

I was born in Leningrad, Russia, in 1979.  In 1990, when I was 11 years old, my mother Lilia and brother Jake and I went to live in Israel.  In the summer of 1996 we came to Canada.

I began painting at the age of 4 and have studied on my own.

In the process of the creative work, I translate my thoughts and understanding of life into colours and forms.  The idea behind my paintings is to help people understand their inner world and their limitless possibilities to transform pain into beauty.

I believe that each of us is an artist in his own way.  This is expressed by countless choices we make in every minute – acting either constructively or destructively.  Even when we feel ourselves weak our power to change is great.

To accept the responsibility – to serve spiritual evolution and absolute love – is our salvation in life.

 

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Media Release

VOICE OF SOPHIA

by Sophie Sonin

GALLERY ARCTURUS

March 18 - April 22, 1999

Opening Reception:  Saturday, March 20, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto...Astonishing realism achieved through painstaking mastery of technique and an intricate use of symbolism characterize the paintings of Toronto prodigy Sophie Sonin in her new solo exhibition Voice of Sophia at Gallery Arcturus.

The luminous portraits and landscapes provide a window into Sonin’s intensely emotional and private inner world.  At the same time, these paintings uncover the meaning hidden in the outer world, a meaning inherent not so much in the subjects themselves as in what they represent. 

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that the Voice of Sophia is the work of an artist who is passionately engaged in a search for truth.  The symbols in her paintings are the intermediaries between her inner and outer worlds, relating the visual surfaces to emotional depths.  Stilo says Sonin’s unique symbolic imagery “transforms the content of her paintings from the particular to    the universal.  These are images to ponder...the striking foregrounds, often consisting of vivid, realistic portraiture, are successively re-interpreted in the light of the symbols and surrealist backgrounds that surround them, leading the viewer into Sophia’s world”.

Sophie Sonin has wielded a paintbrush since she was four.  Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, she lived in Israel for six years before emigrating to Canada. Her extraordinary technique, which is self-taught, has faint echoes of Renoir, Dali and Blake.  Although only 19 years of age her  work already shows  “an original mind envisioning and transforming energies in a unique way”, writes Niki Abraham in the Catholic New Times.

Exhibition

Voice of Sophia Voice of Sophia Sophie Sonin

The Voyage is Love

Thu Jan 21 00:00:00 1999

Saturday, January 23, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

Review / The Voyage is Love

The Voyage is Love, a solo exhibition of oil paintings by Darinka Blagaj is showing at Gallery Arcturus from January 21 to March 13, 1999. In her work Blagaj portrays with tenderness and sensitivity the eternal varieties of motherhood, pregnancy and sweethearts in love.

The paintings have a sweetness about them which is in refreshing contrast tot he dismal cynicism of much contemporary art. Some of the canvasses in the show began with diluted washes of oil paint, and upon this ground the artist has quickly sketched figures with pastels or charcoal. This has created a soft, ethereal quality which admirably conveys the moods and emotions associated with feminine themes, pregnant women, nursing mothers and women caught in moments of inward reflection. The titles of the works seem to be important to the artist, referring as they do to "chakras" or to vortices of subtle energy in the human body, which are described in Indo-Chinese philosophies. Since the number and exact locations of these energy centres within the body vary somewhat in different philosophies, their depiction is open to interpretation. We do not know whether or not Blagaj's portrayal of these energy centres is based upon direct experience, certainly I am not qualified to comment on this, and would prefer to leave these more esoteric considerations to others.

Mother and Child... The Root Chakra, oil and vine charcoal on canvas, 54" x 36", 1999.

This is a tender study of a nude mother holding her sleeping baby whose head is cradled serenely between her breasts. The figures are gestural, being quickly sketched over a prepared red background, and highlighted with yellow and white. A loosely drawn animal head floats below and to the left of the woman's head.

The Dream Duet, oil, charcoal and pastel on Stonehenge paper, 49" x 33", 1993. This is my favorite work in the show. A pair of slumbering lovers, delineated freely by contours, is bounded above and below the grouping by a dark blue wash, making the light values stand out strongly. A red and yellow bird is positioned above the couple while simple, childlike scrawls of a dog, a bird and other forms are scattered around the background, creating a dreamy mood rather like Chagall's paintings. Also included in the show are two totems--tall, thin boards which have been painted with oils. Both totems are 60" high by 5" wide. Yellow figures tumble gracefully against a black background in  Lover's Totem. The tumbling rhythm is nicely accentuated by the placement of flesh colour here and there on the figures.

Paradise Totem  uses multi-coloured oils on wood, but the wood grain is allowed to show through in a pleasing way. This design is comprised of various figures and landscape shapes outlined thickly in black line with rainbow hues filling the forms. A knot in the wood is playfully highlighted.

A novel idea is the Manifestation Wall on which hangs two large pieces of paper, each of which is divided into an array of 50 to 60 tiny drawings. These drawings, measuring about 3" by 3", are freely painted abstracts. Blagaj has invited visitors to choose their favourite drawing. The selected ones will be cut out of the sheets after the show ends and mailed to their admirers for a very nominal fee.

Fred Herescovitch
Toronto, Feb. 3, 1999

 

Biography

Darinka Blagaj: Born January 8th, 1963, Ludbreg Croatia.  Moved to Klagenfurt, Austria 1967.  Emigrated to Toronto, Canada in 1970.

Education: York University, Toronto, graduated with an Honours Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in 1986, majoring in Graphic Design & Etching with minors in Philosophy and Anthropology.

Fluent in four languages: English, Spanish, Croation and French.

Darinka travels extensively, exploring, working, exhibiting and performing in the country she is in ...spontaneously ... in the moment

Darinka creates contemporary mythology with goddesses, lovers and magical characters who occupy a liquid/air, space/time scape... jesters, elf-like characters, angels, magicians, birds and animals dance together performing sacred ceremonies in the spontaneous moment.  Vibrant colours exude a captivating energy ... charged with life ... drawing and painting techniques merge on paper, wood and canvas.

 

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Media Release

THE VOYAGE IS LOVE

by Darinka Blagaj

GALLERY ARCTURUS

January 21 - March 13, 1999

Opening Reception:  Saturday, January 23, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto ... Canvases resplendent in golds and reds present gateways through the body to the spirit “the voyage is love”, a new solo exhibit at Gallery Arcturus by Toronto artist Darinka Blagaj.

Blagaj uses the richness of oils to establish radiant colourfields from which emerge figures defined by the immediacy and presentness of charcoal.  Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo says the effect is “a unique blending of the ethereal and the exact.  The characters are composed from the colourfield and subsist in it, yet in their forms they express a spontaneous, startling individuation, like waves from the sea”.  The exhibition explores the translation of spirit to earth, using colours corresponding to various energetic centres in the body and representations of earth, water, fire and air, the elements which are the media of spirit.

The message in her art, says Blagaj, is that we are a compound of spirit and earth, creation experiencing itself through embodiment, in which we can occasionally catch “a sideways glance of our infinite nature in the sensual world of earth’s canvas”.  The exhibit also includes elements  designed to suggest particular states of being including a crystal fountain and a basin of earth.

“These pieces are not simply metaphors but tactile intermediaries offering communication between the different poles of our being”, says Blagaj. An honours graduate of York University’s School of Fine Arts, Darinka Blagaj has exhibited and performed her works in more than 40 mostly solo shows in Canada, the United States, Spain and Mexico.  In her recent works, she strives to create a contemporary mythology with magical characters occupying a “liquid/air, space/time scape”, an imaginary realm where the viewer can encounter and retrieve the lost parts of herself.

Exhibition

The Voyage is Love The Voyage is Love Darinka Blagaj

Time and Memory

Thu Oct 22 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, October 24, 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

Review / TIME AND MEMORY

  1. "Time and Memory" is a sampling of oil paintings and pencil drawings from four different periods of Larry Middlestadt's career. Upon entering the gallery, it becomes immediately apparent that the artist's forte lies in his ability to portray light convincingly, for these paintings really shine out. This is a difficult skill for any artist to master , and one rarely encountered in contemporary Canadian painting, so to find a Toronto artist who does it this well is a welcome surprise.

We must also appreciate Middlestadt's achievement when measured against those of the majority of today's artists, many of whom have rejected the depiction of luminous effects as being "dated". One is tempted to ponder about this rejection of light as relevant subject matter for painting. Aren't all of Earth's life forms completely dependent on light for their survival? Isn't abandoning light really abandoning the Sustainer of Life, and with it, our hope for survival? What does this symbolize in our age?

To portray light convincingly an artist must understand the tricky relationship between the values (lightness or darkness) of a colour and (brightness). This is by no means an obvious relationship, because it is different for every colour, and, to complicate matters further, it also depends upon the pigment chosen. (Not all reds are the same!)

The earliest canvases in this show are drawn from the Primordia Series, painted between 1990- 1994. The Deep, measuring 48" x 48", is a good place to start. Warm reds nbd roses are counterpoised against sombre blues, and these colours are further enhanced by exploiting the textures of the oil paint. There is much overlaying of smooth and rough until a richly variegated surface results.

Out of Darkness, 58" x 64", Out of Darkness Series, 1994-1996
Evoking an undersea cavern, this large canvas is all watery translucent blues and greens highlighted by white spume. Sweeping arcs of light grey isolate a portion of the painting which seemingly opens into a deep indigo cavern. In the lower left hand corner there are shapes vaguely suggesting sea fans or perhaps coral.

 Stillpoint, 58" x 64", Out of Darkness Series
This is a monochromatic composition done only in greys. Viewed from a distance of 20 feet, a dark building-like mass begins to emerge from the murky atmosphere. It reminds me of a foggy harbourfront.

 Atlantis, 48" x 42", Meditation Series, 1997
This is my favorite work in the show. Lovely rose, orange and turquoise buildings loom out of a ghostly atmosphere created through the skillful use of muted colours. The focal point of the composition is right of centre where the highest values of colour have been brought to light. The subdued reflections cast on the watery foreground enhance the bright tones above it.

Darkness Coming, 48" x 42", Meditation Series
Diagonally placed in the painting, a dark blue zigzag grows brighter as it progresses downward toward the bottom left hand corner of the design. Above this shape, which suggests lightning bolt, the background is orange; below it, a neutral bluff, all of which heightens the intensity of the luminous atmosphere.

In the show there are also small pencil drawings, each 5.75" x 6", which form part of the Meditation Series. Untitled drawings 1 and 11 appear to have started with the artist putting down a coating of graphite on the paper, therefore erasing all manner of straight lines and circular shapes until he was satisfied with his composition. This is a good way to free up the imagination, and such small studies quite often suggest ideas for larger paintings.

 Distant Memory, 36"x 38", Time and Memory Series
The shape of this canvas intrigues me since it is not exactly square. This reminds me of Japanese art in which strict symmetry is usually avoided except for the most formal occasions. Some examples are Shoji screens, paper screens used as room dividers in Japanese houses, in which the paper transmitting light is designed to come through in slightly rectangular shapes, never squares. The same is true of "Go", a difficult and popular board game, in which the lines forming the board's grid are very slightly " off square". So  Distant Memory  (as well as some other canvases) just barely avoids being true square, but for reasons only the artist knows!  Distant Memory suggests a seascape in which the clouds are all lit up in soft orangy yellows, contrasting beautifully with deep sombre green of sea. Waves are hinted in the lower right corner. Like all of Middlestadt's work , this painting is a tranquil one as is befitting a meditative work. Time Tide, 36" x 38", Time and Memory Series.

Standing in front of this painting is like looking down in a fjord. Maroon cliffs descend and dissolve into churning turquoise water somewhere near the bottom of the cliffs. Toward the Light, versions I, II and III are each 36" x 38". Middlestandt's most recent work reveals how the artist has incorporated his knowledge of light into a more realistic or representational approach to painting. In these three paintings forest scenes from the subject matter in which tree canopies are backlit by the sun, creating a lovely warm atmosphere. Tree trunks, branches and leaves have all been simplified and painted not so much as they would appear to the human eye, but rendered instead in various textures which are drawn more from the artist's personal storehouse of memories and ideas. Larry Middlestadt demonstrates a fine sensitivity in reminding us that light is a sustainer of life on Earth. We would do well to reflect upon this and remember that we cannot live without it.

Fred Herscovitch
Toronto, Canada, Nov. 9, 1998

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Media Release

TIME AND MEMORY

by Larry Middlestadt

GALLERY ARCTURUS

October 22 - November 28, 1998

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 24, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Toronto...Can representations of the natural world convey a wide range of human emotion?

The latest canvases of well-known Toronto painter Larry Middlestadt prove it can be done.       In his new solo exhibit Time and Memory at Gallery Arcturus, light animates the natural world, suffusing it with emotional content. In “Towards The Light”, the powerful use of yellow directly illuminates the trees through which the light passes, hiding them in its radiance.  The warmth and exuberance are almost palpable.

In “Night Vision”, the light is reflected, cool and indirect, revealing objects by its absence. The mood is similarly reflective, inward and somber.  In “Time Tide”, light is space, an opening, a portal to freedom.

Middlestadt notes that for most of his life as a painter, “I have been fascinated with the transcendental qualities of light and the possibility of conveying both philosophical and emotional content through non-narrative paintings.  It’s an elusive goal yet it is this possibility that drives my work.  The more representational style of my recent work allows me to deal with light not only as a metaphor for energy and change but as a vehicle for creating images of the natural world that mirror the transitory nature of our reality”.

Since graduating from the Ontario College of Art in 1963, Middlestadt’s work has been featured in many exhibitions from Toronto to Paris and Amsterdam.  His works are also included in a number of prominent corporate collections.  He currently teaches at George Brown College and has frequently lectured on art and juried for artistic awards.

Exhibition

Time and Memory Time and Memory Larry Middlestadt

Larry Middlestadt

Tue Oct 20 00:00:00 1998

http://larrymiddlestadt.com/cv.html                                                  From 1998:

For most of my daily painting life, I have been fascinated with the transcendental qualities of light and the way it animates the natural world.

My early optical paintings dealt with light, geometrically and prismatically. The later works used light and texture atmospherically.

In these latest works nature again becomes my vehicle for dealing with psychic and metaphysical ideas.

This more representational style allows me to deal with light not only as a metaphor for energy and change but as a vehicle for creating images of the natural world that express the transitory nature of reality.

The possibility of conveying both philosophical and emotional content through non narrative paintings seem an elusive goal, yet it is this possibility that drives my work.

Artist

Larry Middlestadt Larry Middlestadt

BARDO TOURS: The Old Cedar Bar 40 Years Later

Sat Oct 10 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, September 12, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

Program Notes

Forty years ago, the pioneers of Abstract Expressionism met at the Cedar Bar on the corner of Broadway and Eleventh Street in Manhattan.  In the words of the feminist writer Margaret Randall (a Cedar Bar habitue), “the Cedar was what happened when the sun went down”.

Of course, it was never the same after Life Magazine wrote it up as an artists’ hangout and middle America came to gawk at the bohemians.  And it died as an institution when the New York School, revolutionaries all, became the new establishment and moved their works to the uptown galleries.

But in the beginning, it was a second home to the “greats”:  Elaine and Willem DeKooning, Franz Kline, David Smith, Alice Neel, Jackson Pollock.  As Randall writes, “we were voluntarily poor because the work came first”.  They talked about the representation of art, of ideas, and of themselves.  They talked about the picture plane, and the freedom to invent the languages they needed.  One night Elizabeth Taylor and Eddie Fisher just happened to drop by.  On other nights, there was a fist fight or two.

This is the world a 17-year-old E.J. Gold entered in 1959.   Once inside, time fell into a dark   well.  Radical ideas about art distilled slowly out of the endless conversations, seeping into the atmosphere and seedy surroundings, settling like a fog on the shadowy denizens.  In a few years, the people moved on.  But Gold has captured the enduring space of these timeless encounters, when the minds of talented artists explored formlessness as a means of expression.

In Bardo Tours, Gold revisits the Cedar Bar, re-creating the timeless mood of dark hours spent deconstructing ordinary reality.  Painting on black canvas suggests the atmosphere.

Featured in these canvases are:  sculptor Noguchi (“Starting To Disintegrate”); painter Franz Kline (“Me and My Habits Apres Three 2 Many ”); painter Hans Hoffman (“Seeing Through”);

painters Elaine and Willem DeKooning (“Soul Mates”); photographer and friend Shep Sherbell

(“Bardo Town Bar”); artist Al Leslie (“Implacably Here”); and art critic J.J. Sweeney (“No Escape From Here”).

The titles refer to that other great school of reality deconstructionism ... Tibetan Buddhism.

The inhabitants are “Voyagers In The Night”, “Longing for the Solid State” while waiting for a “Call For Rebirth” and “A Friendly Guide” to lead them to “A Safe Place”.  But as “Hungry Ghosts”, they are “Betrayed By Appearances” and “Facing The Terrible Clarity” they find   “There Is No Escape From Here”.  Caught in an eternal loop consisting of their own thoughts  and perceptions, they circle round and round within the space of the Old Cedar Bar.

 

Review

by Fred Herscovitch

September 19, 1998

E.J. Gold’s recollections of the Old Cedar Bar in Manhattan are captured in 30 acrylic paintings at Gallery Arcturus in Toronto.  This is the artist’s boldest and strongest work I’ve seen thus far, and it serves as a fitting testimonial to the Abstract Expressionists who haunted this local hangout in the late 50's.  Not that you are likely to recognize any of the faces in these paintings, as all the figures or groups of figures, have been rendered in black silhouette.  Instead, the artist’s intention was to give us a glimpse of an underlying reality which is referred to as The Bardo by Buddhists, a topic which has been exhaustively described in their sacred teachings.  For those who have practiced some form of meditation, the alternative reality alluded to may already be a familiar one, and some of the paintings here will remind them or even lead them into the altered State.  The Spanish verb “seguir” (for which there is no exact English equivalent) comes to mind, for it means: “to lead into”.  These canvases may very well lead the observer into the Bardo.

In a world which is being rapidly consumed by a conflagration of Materialism – some say at an accelerating rate – E.J. Gold must be congratulated by his integrity.  Having forged a personal philosophy, he has avoided art fads and steadfastly painted his Reductionist vision.  The tenets of the Reductionist School are rigorously self-imposed ones amongst which a limited palette plays a prominent role.  All the paintings in Bardo Tours use few colours, but use them well.  First a black ground was put down on the canvas, then the colours are overlaid in such a way that some areas receive no colours at all: these are left to show through as black lines or shapes.  Where colour is put down thinly some of the black ground is allowed to peek through, a process called scumbling.  But aside from this, there is no attempt made to modulate the “value” – lightness or darkness of each colour – by adding various shades of grey to it.

Relying upon “monovalues”, to coin a word, is a severe restriction indeed since the history of painting has been staunchly based upon modulation of values.  I am left wondering whether or not this additional constraint forms an integral part of Reductionist philosophy, or if it has been adopted solely for this series of canvases.  Gold has done it the hard way for Bardo Tours, but it works.

In these paintings, figures, or grouping of figures, are combined into one shape which reminds me of melted wax, and except for the black colour, suggests ectoplasm.  Some areas are outlined with soft, crumbly black line which expresses the natural hand of the artist.

One of my favourite works in the show is Crowd Attraction/Dillon’s 60"x36", which boasts a palette of light and dark green, maroon, red, pink, purple, white and grey.  The colours are well-balanced, and the spaces beautifully thought out which results in a very sold design.

Longing for the Solid State/John at the Cedar, 60"x36".  In this large canvas the strong diagonals of the earth-red bar lined with its black bar stools pull the viewer magnetically into a tunnel-like environment.  The green and purple checkerboard floor emphasizes these diagonals, while the wall surface behind the bar is layered up with red and blue textures over pink.

No Escape from Here/J.J. Sweeney, 20"x12".  Shown in black silhouette, this profile of Sweeney is the closest any painting in the exhibition comes to figurative work.  Standing at a distance from the canvas, the shirt or sweater appears to be the same as the head – black.  But it is shinier!  What’s the difference?  When I approach the painting to get a better look the mystery is solved: the artist has brushed a very low value of blue over the black which accounts for the different degrees of reflectivity.  A stark white shirt collar, purple tie aglow with big pink polka dots, and lemon yellow shirt complete the figure.  At the left of the composition the head is seen framed against a red door which is surrounded by light green.

Bardotown Bar/Shep Sherbell Outside the Cedar Bar, 24"x20".  This little painting is another of my favourites.  It’s a sophisticated design in which a light yellow shape bordering the right edge of the canvas counterpoises white windows in the left background.  The colours are so well played off and satisfying that I found myself returning to the painting again and again.

Facing the Terrible Charity, 30"x20".  A black figure outlined in pinky-red is standing at the right of the composition.  To the left of this imposing figure a converging grid suggests storefront mullions in which the upper window lights are painted hot orangy-pink which spills out of their frame to form the ceiling.  A white triangular shape, where the floor ought to be, surrounds the bottom portion of this personage, making him or her stand out starkly.  The strength of this design lies on its simplicity.

Bardo Tours is well presented with its many different sized canvases staggered on the gallery walls in pleasing configurations.  There’s plenty of room between the paintings allowing them to be appreciated without distractions.  E.J. Gold’s work provokes quiet contemplation.

 

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Media Release

BARDO TOURS:

The Old Cedar Bar 40 Years Later

by E.J. Gold

GALLERY ARCTURUS

September 10 - October 17

Opening Reception:  Saturday, September 12, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto...Few landmarks are historically more important to the New York art scene than the Old Cedar Bar at University Place in Manhattan where such luminaries as Franz Kline,  Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock and Hans Hoffman gathered to expound the truths of Abstract Expressionism in the late 1950s. 

Prominent American artist E.J. Gold frequented this bar as a young man, absorbing the atmosphere and the pursuit of art.  His recollections are captured in this series of 30 paintings enigmatically titled Bardo Tours.  A “bardo” is (in Tibetan) an “in-between”, a space or gap in ordinary reality where the higher dimensions are open to view, especially the timeless apres vie states which subtly penetrate everyday life without our noticing.  Gold wonderfully renders the shadowed environment of the Old Cedar Bar and its inhabitants, displaying them as glimpses into the “bardo”, frozen in time.  Are these chairs, tables and huddled figures existential facts or eternal gestures of the unseen? 

The current show was first exhibited to critical acclaim in the Old Cedar Bar in 1992. A number of the pieces were published in a book of the same name with the text by the celebrated feminist author Margaret Randall who used to visit the bar during the same period.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that “from the perspective of linear time, the people and ideas of the Old Cedar Bar are dead and gone.  But the mood remains, contained within its own space, accessible through these paintings which are windows into that world.”

His art is in the White House but E.J. Gold’s reputation is primarily among other artists, for his daring experimentation, his command of many media and his consummate technique.

His spare, exacting treatments, stripped of non-essential detail and color, have spawned a new school of art called Reductionism.

Exhibition

BARDO TOURS: The Old Cedar Bar 40 Years Later BARDO TOURS: The Old Cedar Bar 40 Years Later E.J. Gold

Return to the Beginning

Thu Jun 4 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, June 6, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

 

Review by Fred Herscovitch

June 1998

"Return to the Beginning"  is an exhibition of large paintings by Irena Vormittag. Three works from the Krakow Series, honouring her birthplace, appear in the show. They are large canvases : Krakow II, for example, measures 84" x 108" and was painted last year.

The artist layers acrylics to build up dense textures; brushwork is restless, animated and complex. Because many analogous colours are used- colours close together in hue- the fragmented images tend to recede and merge with the textural field, then reappear again. In this painting semi-recognizable architectural or figural forms are outlined with thick black lines whereas in Krakow III ( 66" x 90") white lines play the same role.

 

Biography

I grew up in suburban Niagara Falls in the early '50's. My adolescence was nurtured by immigrants who had left a war ravaged Europe. These people had a dream. They wanted big front lawns, big cars, good schools, and a bedroom for each child, lots of food on the table and a steady work that paid well. I lived in that suburban dream, but I always marked myself as being the odd person out. Who could blame me? I spent the first six years of my life in Nazi occupied Krakow.

>Can you imagine how those experiences could color the mind of a six year old?

If anyone needed to embark on a search for identity, it was me. I moved from a place where they rolled up Niagara sidewalks at sunset to New York where the sidewalks were like 24 hour Broadway shows. New York was so big and alive it swallowed all my speed and aggression. Back in Canada, the only people I could relate to were Cree Indians. They started me on an inner quest that took me to the Hopi Indians in the American Southwest and eventually into Tantric:Indian mysticism. In 1996, I was ready to return to Krakow, Poland. I wanted to see my roots in these new perspectives.

I discovered a city whose people inhabited the most intact medieval city in Western Europe. The history there is not confined to schools and libraries. It's painted in building tiles, jammed into corners and cornices and waves at you in flags. It's even under the sidewalks. With no space in the cemeteries, during the worst of occupations, the citizens had to bury their dead under the cobblestones. Every cobblestone holds the history of a moment. The irony is that in this city that is a corridor for martial dreams, the people are so alive. That life, that bhakti, blazes out in even the eyes of the very old. I see 80, 90 year old people going to the market. Energy fills them. They are old but life still dances in their eyes.

It's crazy but in Canada there's almost too much safety here. Too much security. There is nothing to prick us awake.

My paintings are alive. For thirteen years now I have been getting closer and closer to painting on canvas the spirit that moves us. In my paintings, I wat people to see and feel and sense this spirit that I found so readily in Krakow. May it create an opening for their own searching.

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Media Release

Return To The Beginning

by Irena Vormittag

Gallery Arcturus

June 4 - July 18

Opening Reception:  Saturday, June 6, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Toronto artist Irena Vormittag returns to the holy city of Krakow, her birthplace during the Nazi occupation, to record on huge, multi-layered canvases the dark passion of a city’s struggle to live and to be redeemed.  Three of her works from the Krakow Series highlight her new solo exhibit Return To The Beginning at Gallery Arcturus.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo points to the paradox in Vormittag’s work of a city that witnessed so much death and yet is teeming with life.  “Her paintings are dense and sensuous with figures exploding from the background, yet caught in a weave of interconnectedness which portrays the effect of history on the inhabitants of ancient places.  Irena leavens life with death and the resulting ferment disturbs and vivifies the viewer.”  The same depth and emotion resonate from “We’re Here, Too”, an exploration of the way invisible beings — our ancestors, our shadows, our past — invade and influence the present although we are unaware of them.

From Krakow, Irena immigrated to suburban Niagara Falls, a contrast that she likens to oil and water.  Over a 30-year period she left her conventional upbringing and leapt into a thoroughly modern mix of   New York speed, aboriginal vision and Tantric mysticism.  And then, in 1995, she returned home. 

“I discovered a city whose people inhabit the most intact medieval city in Western Europe.  The history there is not confined to schools and libraries.  It’s painted on building tiles, jammed into corners and cornices and waves at you in flags.  It’s even under the sidewalks.  With no space in the cemeteries, during the worst of all occupations, the citizens buried their dead under the cobblestones,” says Vormittag.

Exhibition

Return to the Beginning Return to the Beginning Irena Vormittag

toward the One

Thu Jun 4 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, June 6, 2:30pm - 5:30pm

toward the One…

                                                                light years away                     and

                                                here                         the surprise of closeness

the closeness of surprise

                                                suspended

                my work is a process of mapping that journey as it happens

                                                                                a distillation

of irritation

                stringing pearls together

 

Translated from the depths

Works from recent culling of oyster beds, collages and painted in oil

by deborah harris

 

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   To enable you to have a greater understanding of my work I invite you to ‘see’.

   I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos. That is where one must agree to go. I am an artist in as much as I commit to go there again and again, to record the findings of that journey, to look until I ‘see’.

   Robert Johnson speaks of sentences as an attempt at creating unity out of diversity. “The verb, he says, is the fulcrum point of the sentence and the object and subject are a statement that these things are related to each other.” So also the created work is the fulcrum of the creative process and the subject and object are a statement that we are related to each other. “We have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces.” Creating a context for perception to grow is our gift, an all gift, one for all. “Our struggle is our uniqueness.” vice versa

Art. to join, to fit,   the use or employment of things to answer some special purpose.

Purpose, that which a person places before oneself as a n object to be reached or accomplished.

deborah harris

April 17, 1998

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 To those I love

             to those who love me

those appearing    and disappearing

distant    though never far in thought

you may have wondered

                     I have wondered

how to build a bridge and cross it

                 one side to the other

     no other in the heart

the gift of giving and receiving

always presently enriching.

 

This work is an acknowledgment

of our exchange and transformation

an invitation for you to recognize

                   a place of meeting

turning corners    towards the one.

-- --

 

“Oh Lord open thou my lips and my mouth shall show forth thy praise.”

Psalm 51, Verse 15

-- --

THE GUEST HOUSE

 

This being human is a guest house.

Every morning a new arrival.

 

A joy, a depression, a meanness,

some momentary awareness comes

as an unexpected visitor.

 

Welcome and entertain them all!

Even if they're a crowd of sorrows,

who violently sweep your house

empty of its furniture,

still, treat each guest honorably.

He may be clearing you out

for some new delight.

 

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,

meet them at the door laughing,

and invite them in.

 

Be grateful for whoever comes,

because each has been sent

as a guide from beyond.

 

Jalal al-Din Rumi

--

By the labor and valor of many

I have come into my inheritance

 

toward the One

by deborah harris

Gallery Arcturus

June 4 - July 18

 

Toronto...an extraordinary intimacy pervades the 25 collages and paintings of Toronto artist deborah harris in toward the One, her new solo exhibit at Gallery Arcturus.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that harris is one of the most original and perceptive artists on the Toronto scene.  “Fortunately, she remains completely out-of-step with the modern world and all its brash, material self-seeking.  She is most effective at capturing and evoking those subtle feelings which usually pass us by unrecognized, leaving us vaguely unsettled but unaware of what we have experienced.”

In her collages such as Walk, bits and pieces of images coalesce and juxtapose to suggest inner experiences half seen, glimpsed fleetingly as they disappear from view, tugging at the heart like old love letters, spent yet treasured.

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups — frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  Currently, she is a teacher and custodian of the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.

“I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos...we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art -- especially collage -- is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, toward the One.

--

Review by Fred Herscovitch

June 1998

“Toward the One” is an exhibition of collages and paintings by Toronto artist Deborah Harris currently showing at Gallery Arcturus.  These are unusually sensitive pieces, and demand close scrutiny to appreciate the refinement of technique achieved by the artist.  What impresses me most is the clarity of vision and the great sense of repose in the work.  Deborah Harris demonstrates the all-too-rare ability to know exactly when to stop.  She plays with empty spaces, allowing the viewer’s imagination to take over and fill in what has not been overtly stated.  This is evident in called, a 14"x19" collage and acrylics on board, which evokes a mysterious twilight mood through skillful tearing and pasting of images.  This surely creates something quite different from the twilights we all know, and ones we may never hope to experience.  The approach to framing is quite unusual.  At diagonally opposite corners of this collage the artist has mounted two pieces of frame – frame samples, really – so as not to limit the boundaries by an enclosure.  This reminds me somewhat of the broken pediments and cornices which are characteristics of Rococo architecture.

Argowyn, 52 x 42 in, collage, mixed media on board   view HERE

Deborah Harris has found a splendid piece of long-suffering wood which has been cracked and wonderously coloured by weathering.  Against this backdrop of hairline cracks and hollowed-out knots she has created a figure straight out of the spirit world.  It is all done with torn up photos and cheesecloth treated with vegetable dyes or paints which harmonize perfectly with the subtle colours of the wood.  Broken frames placed at the diagonally opposite corners of a glass overlay complete this terrific piece.

Matrix, 31 x 26 in, oil painting on paper      view  HERE

This is an unusual concept.  An oil painting done on paper has been sandwiched between two sheets of glass and the whole thing mounted in a specially designed wood frame which is mounted on a wall bracket so as to allow it to swing out from the wall like a french window.  This allows a certain limited degree of transmission of light through the painting which can be seen from both sides.  I couldn’t help wondering what effect would be achieved if a more transparent medium were used thus allowing for greater transmission of light.  Stained glass would probably represent the upper limit of translucency which is achievable.

A-men, 33 x 24 in, collage and acrylics on board    view HERE

Here the artist displays extremely sensitive handling of the drawing materials which surround the fragments of collage, seamlessly tying them to the background.

Exhibition

 

toward the One

by deborah harris

Gallery Arcturus

June 4 - July 18

 

Toronto...an extraordinary intimacy pervades the 25 collages and paintings of Toronto artist deborah harris in toward the One, her new solo exhibit at Gallery Arcturus.

Arcturus curator Cathy Stilo notes that harris is one of the most original and perceptive artists on the Toronto scene.  “Fortunately, she remains completely out-of-step with the modern world and all its brash, material self-seeking.  She is most effective at capturing and evoking those subtle feelings which usually pass us by unrecognized, leaving us vaguely unsettled but unaware of what we have experienced.”

In her collages such as Walk, bits and pieces of images coalesce and juxtapose to suggest inner experiences half seen, glimpsed fleetingly as they disappear from view, tugging at the heart like old love letters, spent yet treasured.

As a child, deborah’s first artist perspectives were close-ups — frogs, insects, looking at the world through the small weave of curtains, the play of light and shadow in reflected images, windows and doors, framed openings to a larger view.  Her ability to expose larger truths through close-up detail continues to characterize her work.  Currently, she is a teacher and custodian of the Annex Art Centre in Toronto.

“I believe art is born out of an obsession to find order inside of chaos...we have to recreate ourselves because we have torn ourselves to pieces”, harris says.  Her art -- especially collage -- is a map of her struggle to re-unite the fragments, her journey, as she says, toward the One.

--

Review by Fred Herscovitch

June 1998

“Toward the One” is an exhibition of collages and paintings by Toronto artist Deborah Harris currently showing at Gallery Arcturus.  These are unusually sensitive pieces, and demand close scrutiny to appreciate the refinement of technique achieved by the artist.  What impresses me most is the clarity of vision and the great sense of repose in the work.  Deborah Harris demonstrates the all-too-rare ability to know exactly when to stop.  She plays with empty spaces, allowing the viewer’s imagination to take over and fill in what has not been overtly stated.  This is evident in called, a 14"x19" collage and acrylics on board, which evokes a mysterious twilight mood through skillful tearing and pasting of images.  This surely creates something quite different from the twilights we all know, and ones we may never hope to experience.  The approach to framing is quite unusual.  At diagonally opposite corners of this collage the artist has mounted two pieces of frame – frame samples, really – so as not to limit the boundaries by an enclosure.  This reminds me somewhat of the broken pediments and cornices which are characteristics of Rococo architecture.

Argowyn, 52 x 42 in, collage, mixed media on board   view HERE

Deborah Harris has found a splendid piece of long-suffering wood which has been cracked and wonderously coloured by weathering.  Against this backdrop of hairline cracks and hollowed-out knots she has created a figure straight out of the spirit world.  It is all done with torn up photos and cheesecloth treated with vegetable dyes or paints which harmonize perfectly with the subtle colours of the wood.  Broken frames placed at the diagonally opposite corners of a glass overlay complete this terrific piece.

Matrix, 31 x 26 in, oil painting on paper      view  HERE

This is an unusual concept.  An oil painting done on paper has been sandwiched between two sheets of glass and the whole thing mounted in a specially designed wood frame which is mounted on a wall bracket so as to allow it to swing out from the wall like a french window.  This allows a certain limited degree of transmission of light through the painting which can be seen from both sides.  I couldn’t help wondering what effect would be achieved if a more transparent medium were used thus allowing for greater transmission of light.  Stained glass would probably represent the upper limit of translucency which is achievable.

A-men, 33 x 24 in, collage and acrylics on board    view HERE

Here the artist displays extremely sensitive handling of the drawing materials which surround the fragments of collage, seamlessly tying them to the background.

toward the One 160 toward the One deborah harris

My Other Self

Thu Apr 23 00:00:00 1998

 

Biographies

E.J. GOLD boasts a rich and diversified background beginning with his first years in New York City where he grew up surrounded by the Who’s Who in the arts in America of the 40's and 50's.  A precocious child, he had his first major showing at the Museum of Modern Art in 1948 and in the same year met Henri Matisse whose impromptu art lesson left an indelible mark on him.  In the late fifties, he became associated with the Cedar Tavern Group of the New York School and regularly met with Pollock, Kline and de Kooning.  After this auspicious debut, Gold moved to Los Angeles where he studied and taught at the Otis Art Institute, while at the same time producing and selling art, as well as working with Lebrun and Schwaderer.  During the sixties, he became well known within the California Nine and was widely recognized for his invention of soft and breathing sculptures.  The seventies led him into many directions including music production and writing science fiction and transformational psychology, with numerous titles to his name to date.  Since his “art reemergence” in 1986, Gold has entered a prolific period boldly reasserting himself as an experimental artist.  His diversity and proficiency leave critics and admirers astonished: ink washes, pastels, gouaches, acrylics, oils, charcoals, linocuts, serigraphs, pen and inks – all clearly demonstrate his awesome talent and discipline.  Gold and members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group conceived and wrote the manifesto for The School of Reductionism in 1987.

DELLA HEYWOOD: Born in Vancouver, Della’s primary interest from early childhood was art.  She attended the Emily Carr School of Art and Capilano College where she studied a variety of artistic mediums.  In her development as an artist, Della was influenced by the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and the Surrealists.  This is revealed in her love of light, intensity of colour and appreciation for dream-like realities.  Her paintings document her quest to strip away habitual cognition and enter into the magical world behind and within ordinary perception.  Della currently lives in California and has become one of the most accomplished members of the School of Reductionism.

STEPHANIE BOYD  was born and raised in south California.  As a dancer and musician, she became involved in politically committed performance art at the University of California’s San Diego campus.  She later travelled around the United States and performed rallies and on street corners.  Boyd returned to California and attended UCSC where she gained a solid understanding of art history and philosophy.  She travelled through Europe visiting the major museums, painting in Spain and becoming involved in some performance art in Amsterdam.  Returning to the United States she joined the School of Reductionism and continues to work in many mediums, music being an integral part of her work.

TOM X (Johnson) is a well known artist with many of his paintings in major American and European collections.  During the seventies, Tom X explored figurative distortions and perspective.  In 1976 his work was exhibited at the Denver Art Museum with shows following in New York, Sacramento and Vancouver.  In the late seventies he entered a Cubist phase which reached an aesthetic height with his bronze sculpture, “The Jester”.  Tom X ventured into printmaking during the eighties and his silkscreen prints projected a dark mood reminiscent of Erich Heckel and George Rouault.  In the late eighties he joined E.J. Gold and helped formulate the Manifesto of Reductionism.  His current works are electrifying with colourful figures and heavy black lines.  The work of Tom X pushes the boundaries and provides an original synthesis of tradition with a post-modernist outlook.  He now works out of Los Angeles, New York and Germany.

DOUGLASS-TRUTH was born in Indianapolis.  Under the mistaken impression that he was colour blind, he pursued a wide variety of professions before becoming an artist.  After this misconception was corrected he began his artistic studies in earnest, discovering in the process that “I have never met a colour I didn’t like”.  In 1969, he founded the Douglass-Truth Institute, publishing text, illustrations and manufacturing and distributing promotional items.  Truth has travelled and researched extensively throughout Asia, reviving the Japanese Doronto printmaking method in the process.  His stories and articles have been published in a wide range of magazines such as Boing-Boing, Possessed and Talking Raven.  He is an active member of the School of Reductionism.

MENLO MACFARLANE is the wizard among the artists of the School.  With his multimedia work in performance and visual arts he defies any categorization.  He has been referred to as a genuine shamanic artist with a professional background in dancing (worked with Alvin Nikolai and Merce Cunningham, among others) whose pastels and luminaires have gained him an international reputation.  The mood, not the mind, is the key to MacFarlane’s art: “I don’t try to think about my art, I don’t draw from the mind.  I work with my hands, and if I could, I would work with my eyes closed.”.  Menlo’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States and parts of Canada and he continues to be a principal member of the School of Reductionism.

R.C. TRICE was born in Vancouver in 1957.  He is a painter, sculptor, actor, puppeteer, musician, art conservator and picture framer.  His work ranges from haunting and shadowy canvases to his highly original series Bag People, character portraits on ordinary brown paper bags, now available in ceramics as well.  His work rests upon a lifetime of studying classical European and Oriental traditions.  Robbert’s works have recently been exhibited in Vancouver, New York, Chicago, Sacramento, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Toronto.  He also serves as the President of Heidelberg Editions International, the corporate name used by the artists of The School of Reductionism.

FM SCHILL: Born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1961, FM was half-breed, half German and half West Virginia hillbilly.  Dressed in orange on St. Patrick’s Day by his mother, FM was unsure how to fit in with the local people of his blue collar suburban neighborhood, known as Brook Park.  FM is a graduate of Cleveland State University and taught high school in the inner-city.  It is and has been the work and association with E.J. Gold’s work which inspired FM to pick up a brush, a pastel, a charcoal, and enter the fine art dimensions.  Whether creating and organizing art shows in Chicago with his new partner Rosanna Ortiz, exploring with brush and canvas, or navigating the macrodimensions, whatever the moment look like FM is attempting to penetrate it through his works with others.  Whether it is a high school student, or a client or himself, they are all the same, the same projection and his art is an attempt to leave bread crumbs behind for himself and the “others” as well as a forward glimpse behind the veil which we call life.

 

Review by Fred Herscovitch

May 21, 1998

My Other Self

School of Reductionism

Fourteen artists representing the Northern California School of Reductionism are showing their work at Gallery Arcturus from April 23 to May 30, 1998.  The school was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold and other California artists and now has expanded to include more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors.  A manifesto drawn up by the school’s founders outline three broad principles which its adherents more or less embody: briefly stated, they are:

1. Essentialism: Recognizable objects are portrayed with fewest possible lines and details – hence the term “Reductionism”.  Reducing objects to their essentials is simply another way of saying “Abstraction”.  Colours employed are few, vibrant and sharply contrasting.

2. Timelessness: Reductionism does not set out to capture action or movement, or any sort of specific event, so that nothing “happens”, in the sense that we normally understand it.  Because nothing is “happening”, objects appear frozen in time, which free both the artist and viewer to focus more easily on pure emotions.

3. Space: Although linear perspective is eliminated, a minimal suggestion of space is suggested, the rest is being left to the viewer’s imagination.  In Reductionist Art the act of completion by the viewer’s mind is deemed to be of primary importance, and the whole act of creation is directed toward this active participation.  The philosophy of Reductionism then goes on to state that a work of art begins with an aesthetic perception in the mind of the artist who then attempts to capture this perception in such a way that the viewer will have the same experience as the artist.  In this sense, Reductionist Art is an attempt to exact communication, and not an exploration of the subjective state of the creator.  Reductionist theory then concludes that this approach is “Objective” in nature.

While walking around Gallery Arcturus, I tried to ascertain whether or not the art exhibited in “My Other Self” met the criteria of the Reductionist Manifesto.  It is easy enough to see when a figure or form has been reduced to bare essentials; that strongly contrasting colours have been chosen; that no specific event has been portrayed and that linear perspective has been disregarded in favour of a minimally suggested space.  Most of the work in the show conformed to these rules with a few exceptions here and there such as Stephanie Boyd’s “ The Maya” or Richard Hart’s “Magician” or Denise Wey’s “Grandmother” to name a few.  This left me wondering whether or not these artists have chosen deliberately to break with the rules of Reductionism, or if they have been experimenting with other approaches concurrently with their allegiance to the School.

What confuses me though, is the use of the word “objective” art when describing Reductionism.  The word “objective” implies an object or event which is measurable in some way.  In the context of Reductionism, the capturing of emotions experienced during the act of perception is alleged to evoke similar ones in the mind of the viewer, and is thus objective.  As the observer of a work of art, how can I ever be sure that the experience I’m having is the same as the artist?  This chain of logic requires a great leap of faith, as the human mind is complex beyond measure.  So I will leave aside this rather dubious conclusion in favour of describing the show just as I saw it.

“Feeling Unconfined”, by E.J. Gold, acrylic and conte crayon on unstretched canvas, 70"x120"

This is the largest piece in the exhibition, Gold uses diluted green acrylic paint for its watercolour effect, and, working quickly with brown conte, his gestural lines sketch out an environment of folded planes which do not obey the laws of linear perspective.  The conte appears to have been worked over with a wide wet brush, making the lines bleed and this earth brown colour gets worked into areas suggesting doorways.  Near the ceiling a massive astral figure floats, melding with the background.  The effect is quite eeire.  In his other canvases, Gold’s figures never refer to specific people; they are masks designed to evoke moods through spontaneous line, colour, or atmospheric devices such as the smudged lines in “Feeling Unconfined”.

“Angel of Gratitude:, Yanesh, 1997, ceramic sculpture

A bone-white abstract figure, about ten inches high, casts soft pleasing shadows on its sensuous glaze which is demarcated by faint striations.  This little sculpture begs to be touched. 

“Angel in the Mirror”, Della Heywood, acrylic on canvas, 40"x30"

Della Heywood’s canvases are powerful.  She uses intensely charged colours on a black background.  A dry brush dragged over the dark ground produces lovely textures.  Her “Tall Figures in Hat VI”, oil on canvas, 48"x60", is particularly dramatic.  Tall, spindly black figures are outlined by yellow-orange flames which are projected against a lurid landscape and sky.

“The Crooked House”, Douglass-Truth, 1998, acrylic on canvas, 36"x36"

We see a room interior having titled picture planes for the walls and floor.  The artist’s excellent colour sense is displayed through his handling of earth colours.  Forms are outlined in broken, soft black lines while dry brushwork over the black ground gives pleasing textures.

“Portrait of the Artist as a Red-Faced Donkey”, Menlo MacFarlane, 1995, media on paper, 22"x30"

This texturally-rich work shows fine colour sensibility.  We see a highly abstract figure having a reddish-purple head with two footprints growing out of it like antennae.  Various shapes are outlines in broken polychrome lines with what appears to be pastels.

“Babs One”, Aviko, 1998, German gouache on black paper, 9 7/8"x22"

It is the simplicity of approach which makes this drawing work so well.  A figure is defined by broad red brush strokes, cleverly leaving a good deal of black ground to speak for itself.  The negative space is the complementary colour green which defines the composition clearly.

“The Maya”, Stephanie Boyd, 1998, acrylic and paint crayon on canvas, 16"x12"

This portrait effectively captures an unearthly mood due to its restricted palette of adjacent hues applied in low values with the exception of a bold splash in the foreground.

“Magician”, Richard Hart, 1990, charcoal on arches paper, 24"x19"

An ancient Chinese sage, surrounded by halo of Chinese characters, creates a mysterious mood.

“Face in the Mirror”, Tom X (Johnson), 1997, oil on canvas, 30"x24"

This is a good textural study in which the artist portrays himself as a grotesque face regarding his reflection in the mirror.  The design is well-balanced.

“Pilgrims”, R.C. Trice, 1997, acrylic on canvas, 24"x30"

Dark figures march by against an intensely hot orange background.  Voilet mountains are seen in the distance while a flesh-coloured sun looms in the blue sky, all of which evokes a strong mood.

“Apparition I”, Fred Schill, 1998, acrylic on canvas, 24"x20"

A featureless, mannequin-like head, such as the ones appearing in surrealist paintings, is placed against a dark sienna background, crating a feeling of stark isolation.

“Las Tres Mujeres” (The Three Women), Rose Ortiz, 1998, acrylic on canvas, 24"x36"

Three heads, executed in different painting styles, are lined up.  On the left is a mask-like, flesh-coloured head.  In the centre a frontal view in a semi-figurative style is painted in green, while on the right we see a profile view of a skull.  To the far left of the canvas is a blue elephant, while on the extreme right side a ladder leads nowhere.  All these elements are grouped against a purple background.  Are these objects so carefully planned and painted, personal symbols of the artist?  We can only be left to conjecture about their meaning.

“Grandmother”, Denise Wey, 1996, watercolour on paper, 11"x15"

This figurative portrait of grandmother, oriented three-quarters to the right, captures a far away look in the woman’s eyes.

MY OTHER SELF

 

The School of Reductionism

GALLERY ARCTURUS

April 23 - May 30, 1998

Eleven artists of the School of Reductionism explore the basic separation between personality and deeper essence in My Other Self, a new exhibition of paintings and sculpture at Gallery Arcturus.

Curator Cathy Stilo explains that “my usual self is a matter of public record...habitual behaviours and opinions, built up over a lifetime.  My other self is fearless and willing to risk all for a moment of transcendence.  This exhibition examines this basic dichotomy which exists in all of us.”

The exhibition features eight canvases by prominent American artist E.J. Gold.  His figures are disturbingly de-formed, often merging with the space they occupy.  They are characterized by fluid gestures and float within an impersonal minimalist space, seemingly outside of time and free of the constraints of personal history.  In contrast, Canadian Menlo McFarlane’s figures are sharply defined, portraying particular character traits.  Douglass-Truth provides all the visual props of another self, which is never visible in the paintings...everything is waiting for him to make an appearance.

The School of Reductionism is an exciting recent movement in contemporary art.  The school was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist’s community in Northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who are working with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Exhibition, Group Show

MY OTHER SELF

 

The School of Reductionism

GALLERY ARCTURUS

April 23 - May 30, 1998

Eleven artists of the School of Reductionism explore the basic separation between personality and deeper essence in My Other Self, a new exhibition of paintings and sculpture at Gallery Arcturus.

Curator Cathy Stilo explains that “my usual self is a matter of public record...habitual behaviours and opinions, built up over a lifetime.  My other self is fearless and willing to risk all for a moment of transcendence.  This exhibition examines this basic dichotomy which exists in all of us.”

The exhibition features eight canvases by prominent American artist E.J. Gold.  His figures are disturbingly de-formed, often merging with the space they occupy.  They are characterized by fluid gestures and float within an impersonal minimalist space, seemingly outside of time and free of the constraints of personal history.  In contrast, Canadian Menlo McFarlane’s figures are sharply defined, portraying particular character traits.  Douglass-Truth provides all the visual props of another self, which is never visible in the paintings...everything is waiting for him to make an appearance.

The School of Reductionism is an exciting recent movement in contemporary art.  The school was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist’s community in Northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who are working with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

My Other Self My Other Self

Emergence

Tue Jan 20 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, January 24, 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

Review

by Paul Jacob - King's College, University of Western Ontario

 

Art for the Millennium?

Our current end-of-term cliche has already lost its flavour years before the event, but for some of us it has triggered a warming twitch of nostalgia for the millennium of our relative youth in the early seventies, when I first met Peter Banks. Fellow ex-pats and recent Torontonians, we became close friends drawn together by, among many common quirks, a shared interest in visionary art.

Back then the apocalypse was homely and fervent, far from the cool grimace of postmodern irony. We were especially taken with the work the great English Romantic visionaries Blake, Turner, and Samuel Palmer. As prophesied to students of Northrup Frye at the University of Toronto in those days, the Romantic apocalypse saw eternity in a moment of existential grace achieved by creative imagination--concepts now archived in postmodern quotation marks as naive whims of an innocence prior to our fall into a shallower abyss of self-consciousness. That millennium (while it clearly answered the mid-century anxiety that came to a head in the war years shortly after Peter was born) professed to have nothing to do with history or time except to put it aside as a veil of misinformation under which eternity pulsates, inviting us to break through to a better place.

On the face of it, Peter's work seemed closer to more muscular forms of abstract expressionism than it did to para-representational strains of British visionary painting. A repertory of recurring motifs developed over the years: doors, windows, archways that double as Mosaic tablets, mountains, sutures, veils, garments, strips and sheets of overlapping fabric of all sorts, all concealing and opening onto vistas of light. These metaphors for vision allude to and emerge from a method of personal archaeology that fosters timelessness by constantly rediscovering and transforming bits of past paintings into new ones. The many-layered, many-textured thickness of Peter's paintings remind us that his training as a sculptor has never been entirely put aside, just re-routed into a kind of painting whose insistence on poking through exceeds the limits of two-dimensional illusion.

 

Artist's Statement

Landscape is the work of the mind. Its scenery is built up as much from the strata of memory as from layers or rock. By looking, we rediscover, we recognise, the transcendental in the earthly. In a secular world, we seek a consolation for mortality and find it in the ordered beauty of nature.

From my first vocation as a sculptor, I bring to my paintings a fascination with strata, layered intention. The viewer of my paintings should be an archaeologist, stripping away the physical layers to find the subsurface meanings, to recover memory.

These abstract concepts have a direct physical expression in my work. A common foundation of the current works is that all have been reworked from old pieces. Texture and a tactile surface are built up by incorporating fragments of old work, muslin, canvas, rice paper and silica sand with acrylic medium and paint. Studio debris such as acrylic shapes moulded in old paint containers also finds its way into these works. Some pieces begin with sedimentary layers of paint and material that are then slashed and ripped to reveal underlying strata. Other pieces are based on wet paper worked and moulded into three dimensional torn shapes. The finished works are an accretion of various materials given coherence by the paint.

The process of creation in these multi-layered works expresses both organic growth and decay and fragmentation. The painted images, surfaces peeled away to varying depths, reflect the archaeology of peeling paint and structures on urban walls, the multilayered past supporting the present.

 

Biography

Peter Banks was born in Birmingham, England on September 25, 1938. He attended Bournemouth College of Art from 1956 to 1960. After working in London and southern England, he immigrated to Canada in 1974. Currently he lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

FILM
1980 "Muralissimo", 15 min. colour, 16 mm film
© Board of Education, North York, Canada

TV
1985 "Meet the Artist", September 30, 1985
Global Television, Toronto, Canada

PRINCIPAL EXHIBITIONS

Group
1997 Illuminary Gallery, Toronto
1989 Isaacs Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1988 Ruby-Fiorino Gallery, Toronto, Canada
Rosing Fine Art, Toronto, Canada
Ontario Arts Council, Toronto, Canada
1987 Erindale Campus Art Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1985 The Elmwood Gallery, Toronto, Canada
Bonnie Kagan Gallery, Toronto, Canada
Helander/Rubenstein Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida
1984 Market Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1983 Lindsay Art Gallery, Lindsay, Canada
Rails End Gallery, Haliburton, Canada
1982 New York Art Expo '82, New York, N.Y.
Evelyn Amis Fine Arts, Toronto, Canada
Nancy Teague Gallery, Seattle, Washington
1981 Grunwald Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1980 Factory 77, Toronto, Canada
1979 Aggregation Gallery, Toronto, Canada
Factory 77, Toronto, Canada
1978 Cobourg Art Gallery, Cobourg, Canada
1977 Piccadilly Gallery, London, England
1962 Hambleton Gallery, Blandford, Dorset, England
1961 Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, England
Grabowski Gallery, Bornemouth, England

Solo
1997 Illuminary Gallery, Toronto
1995 Ecology Centre, London, England
1988 Goethe Institute, Toronto, Canada
1986 Ruby-Fiorino Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1984 Art Rental Gallery, AGO, Toronto
The Elmwood Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1983 Hart House, University of Toronto, Canada
1980 Aggregation Gallery, Toronto, Canada
1978 Orchard View Library, Toronto, Canada
Art Works, Toronto, Canada
1976 Parkdale Library, Toronto, Canada
1975 Nancy Poole's Studio, Toronto, Canada
1974 Hambleton Gallery, Blandford, Dorset, England
1973 Square Gallery, Taunton, Somerset, England
1968 Arts Laboratory, London, England
1967 University of Hull, Yorkshire, England
1962 Voisen Gallery, Jersey, U.K.

PRINCIPAL COLLECTIONS
Works in numerous private and public collections in Canada and abroad.

http://www.arturge.com/Peter_Banks/bankscv.htm

Exhibition

Emergence Emergence Peter Banks

Asia Calling

Wed Mar 18 00:00:00 1998

Saturday, March 21, 2:30-5:30pm

 

The Ego and the Light

by Carol George

Extract from her letter of June 28, 1967

We are all pilgrims journeying, without any alternative choice, between birth and death. The same question confronts us all: Why are we here? It is a living question to carry on our pilgrim's way, never forgetting that we do not know the answer. And "the same light lighteth every man that cometh into the world," though most of us hide our light under a bushel. This journey, this question and this light are what we have in common. They are the true, unshakeable and undeniable foundation of the brotherhood of man.

Light is one. There may be many separate lights, both great and small, like the sun and the lamps of a temple, but they all partake of the nature of light. When many lights shine together, they merge in a common brightness; you cannot draw a line to show where one ends and another begins.

It is otherwise with that which hides the light. The "bushel" is the ego, that which affirms itself as separate from, and superior to, other egos (in Buddhist terms ahamkara). The relations between egos are by nature competitive. Sometimes they compete in trying to please each other, sometimes in trying to get the better of each other, each even trying to prove that it is more religious or more good or more unselfish than another. But we must not be deceived by that. No real truth can come from the ego since its business is to affirm itself, and that is already a contradiction of the light hidden under it, which wishes only to flow out and blend with the totality of light. So long as a person is unwilling to see and acknowledge that a contradiction exists within himself between the light and the bushel, he is completely under the power of the bushel. The bushel hides the light even from the person himself. This is saying the same thing as that "conscience is buried." We can live our whole lives without ever seeing and acknowledging the contradiction.

A true relationship between human beings can exist only on the basis of the unifying light, and not the dividing ego. The light is always there, so a true relationship is always possible.

What I wish for you is the same as what I wish for myself: that the light may be free to shine forth, to blend with the light of others, of each other, and to light us on our pilgrim's way. Perhaps it does sometimes, even now. At such moments we can recognize what unites us, and also that which, the rest of the time, divides us. While there is life, there is hope!

 

Biography

Carol George
1918-1996

We are all pilgrims journeying, without any alternative choice, between birth and death. The same question confronts us all: Why are we here? It is a living question to carry on our pilgrim's way, never forgetting that we do not know the answer. And " the same light lighteth every man that cometh into the world," though most of us hide our light under a bushel. This journey, this question and this light are what we have in common. They are the true, unshakeable and undeniable foundation of the brotherhood of man.

Light is one. There may be many separate lights, both great and small, like the sun and the lamps of a temple, but they all partake of the nature of light. When many lights shine together, they merge in a common brightness; you cannot draw a line to show where one ends and another begins.

It is otherwise with that which hides the light. The "bushel" is the ego, that which affirms itself as separate from, and superior to, other egos (in Buddhist terms ahamkara). The relations between egos are by nature competitive. Sometimes they compete in trying to please each other, sometimes in trying to get the better of each other, each even trying to prove that it is more religious or more good or more unselfish than another. But we must not be deceived by that. No real truth can come from the ego since its business is to affirm itself, and that is already a contradiction of the light hidden under it, which wishes only to flow out and blend with the totality of light. So long as a person is unwilling to see and acknowledge that a contradiction exists within himself between the light and the bushel, he is completely under the power of the bushel. The bushel hides the light even from the person himself. This is saying the same thing as that "conscience is buried." We can live our whole lives without ever seeing and acknowledging the contradiction.

A true relationship between human beings can exist only on the basis of the unifying light, and not the dividing ego. The light is always there, so a true relationship is always possible.

What I wish for you is the same as what I wish for myself: that the light may be free to shine forth, to blend with the light of others, of each other, and to light us on our pilgrim's way. Perhaps it does sometimes, even now. At such moments we can recognize what unites us, and also that which, the rest of the time, divides us. While there is life, there is hope!

Born in Toronto, Carol grew up in Gravenhurst, Ontario, where her father, Dr. Charles Parfitt, was head of the TB Sanitarium. After attending BSS in Toronto and Miss Edgar's and Miss Cramp's School in Montreal, she studied for a year at Trinity College before transferring to Wellesley College where she graduated with honours in Greek in 1940. As the wife of Canadian diplomat James George, she travelled the world, exploring in depth some of its most interesting countries and cultures. She lived for five years in India and Nepal, another five in Iran and the Gulf, four years in Sri Lanka, three years in Greece and nine in France, as well as two years in London during World War II.

The photos in this memorial exhibition of her work were taken in South Asia and West Asia between 1967 and 1977. Her technical skill as a photographer she owed to Roloff Beny, whom she accompanied on many of his photo safaris in India, Sri Lanka and Iran when he was making his memorable books on these countries. But her eye and her sensitivity to the inner meaning of Asian cultures were her own, and Roloff Beny would have acknowledged that she helped him to see as much as he helped her to use her Nikon.

Carol's talent for seeing was recognized in exhibitions of her photographs in Delhi and Teheran, and later, across Canada through a touring exhibition organized by the Museum of Man in Ottawa. The Royal Ontario Museum has requested and will receive her photo archives; recording for posterity historic monuments and treasures of cultures that even in the past twenty years have been disappearing at an alarming rate.

For Carol, the challenge of seeing with as much awareness, understanding and compassion as is humanly possible was always a call to being. As she has poignantly described in one of her letters from which an extract is attached, she was also well aware of what distorts our attempts to see clearly. Seeing herself objectively, she was more able to see truly another person or another culture. The inner light was for her not just a metaphor. It was through the cultivation of that light, with the help of some of the greatest contemporary spiritual teachers of the East and the West, that she had come to the quality of "seeing" that is reflected in her remarkable photographs.

ASIA CALLING

Photographs by Carol George

GALLERY ARCTURUS

March 18 - April 18, 1998

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 21, 2:30-5:30pm

Toronto...The transcendent beauty of fragile, traditional cultures now almost lost from view is lovingly recorded in the memorial photo exhibition Asia Calling at Gallery Arcturus from March 18 to April 18.  Photographer Carol George, a friend and colleague of Roloff Beny, used her unparalleled access to ancient treasures opened to her by her husband, Canadian Ambassador and High Commissioner James George, to reach into the heart of Asia.

The more than 70 black and white photographs in the exhibition, taken from 1967 to 1977 in South and West Asia, provide glimpses into timeless depths through the faces, forms and gestures of cultures dedicated to the placement of human beings within a spiritual world.

Carol’s decision to take photography seriously was the concluding phase of a long seduction by light.  Photography was to her a “learning how to see” not only the form of things but also the meaning that transpires through what appears, the place where “truth and beauty meet”.  Although involved in a modern society providing her with an insider’s appreciation of many of the great events of the twentieth century, she brought to her work the subtleties and sensitivities of a traditional era.  These attributes established a profound sympathy between her and her subjects which lends to the photographs a quality of intimacy and real contact with the underlying sense of what is seen.

Toronto photographer Sim Posen, who accompanied George on several of her photo safaris in Iran, notes that she “worked with gentle passion which inspired the younger artists, photographers and writers who were attracted to her circle”.  Her works are being archived by the Royal Ontario Museum.

Exhibition

ASIA CALLING

Photographs by Carol George

GALLERY ARCTURUS

March 18 - April 18, 1998

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 21, 2:30-5:30pm

Toronto...The transcendent beauty of fragile, traditional cultures now almost lost from view is lovingly recorded in the memorial photo exhibition Asia Calling at Gallery Arcturus from March 18 to April 18.  Photographer Carol George, a friend and colleague of Roloff Beny, used her unparalleled access to ancient treasures opened to her by her husband, Canadian Ambassador and High Commissioner James George, to reach into the heart of Asia.

The more than 70 black and white photographs in the exhibition, taken from 1967 to 1977 in South and West Asia, provide glimpses into timeless depths through the faces, forms and gestures of cultures dedicated to the placement of human beings within a spiritual world.

Carol’s decision to take photography seriously was the concluding phase of a long seduction by light.  Photography was to her a “learning how to see” not only the form of things but also the meaning that transpires through what appears, the place where “truth and beauty meet”.  Although involved in a modern society providing her with an insider’s appreciation of many of the great events of the twentieth century, she brought to her work the subtleties and sensitivities of a traditional era.  These attributes established a profound sympathy between her and her subjects which lends to the photographs a quality of intimacy and real contact with the underlying sense of what is seen.

Toronto photographer Sim Posen, who accompanied George on several of her photo safaris in Iran, notes that she “worked with gentle passion which inspired the younger artists, photographers and writers who were attracted to her circle”.  Her works are being archived by the Royal Ontario Museum.

Asia Calling Asia Calling Carol George

Pollen and Fragments

Wed Nov 5 00:00:00 1997

Wednesday, November 5, 6:00-8:00pm

POLLEN AND FRAGMENTS

by Ed Cramer

GALLERY ARCTURUS

November 5 - December 5, 1997

Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 5, 6:00-8:00pm

The first Toronto exhibition by New York artist Ed Cramer features impressively large, abstract works, acrylic on wood panel, windows that open into timeless worlds captured within hand crafted frames which complete the work.

These works combine surprisingly strong emotions with the precision of geometric forms. The color-defined geometric shapes appear to be suspended in space, their volume and definition enhanced by luminous backgrounds. The elements are meticulously placed to suggest the relationship between them. The overall effect is airy and spacious, inviting contemplation.

Cramer says the works reflect his interest in inner states of being which "continue to set the direction of my life and my art." A graduate of Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, Cramer is now a director of the Discovery Institute, a fourth way school and artistic community located in New Paltz, New York. "I wish to create art that has presence, that is alert, alive and breathing. My aim is to connect the gravity of earth to the realm of the celestial in work that resonates with a singular, all encompassing emotion."

Exhibition

POLLEN AND FRAGMENTS

by Ed Cramer

GALLERY ARCTURUS

November 5 - December 5, 1997

Opening Reception: Wednesday, November 5, 6:00-8:00pm

The first Toronto exhibition by New York artist Ed Cramer features impressively large, abstract works, acrylic on wood panel, windows that open into timeless worlds captured within hand crafted frames which complete the work.

These works combine surprisingly strong emotions with the precision of geometric forms. The color-defined geometric shapes appear to be suspended in space, their volume and definition enhanced by luminous backgrounds. The elements are meticulously placed to suggest the relationship between them. The overall effect is airy and spacious, inviting contemplation.

Cramer says the works reflect his interest in inner states of being which "continue to set the direction of my life and my art." A graduate of Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, Cramer is now a director of the Discovery Institute, a fourth way school and artistic community located in New Paltz, New York. "I wish to create art that has presence, that is alert, alive and breathing. My aim is to connect the gravity of earth to the realm of the celestial in work that resonates with a singular, all encompassing emotion."

Pollen and Fragments Pollen and Fragments Ed Cramer

Ed Cramer

Sat Jul 26 00:00:00 1997

No biography is available at this time.

Artist

Ed Cramer Ed Cramer

Spirit Forms

Wed Oct 1 00:00:00 1997

Friday, October 3, 5:30 - 8:30 pm

SPIRIT FORMS

by Andrea Maguire           

GALLERY ARCTURUS

October 1 - November 1, 1997

Opening Reception: Friday, October 3, 5:30 - 8:30 pm

Toronto artist Andrea Maguire uses abstract forms with the primal textures and colours of ancient art to evoke the most elemental archetypes of human artistic expression in Spirit Forms, the new exhibition at Gallery Arcturus.

Andrea Maguire is rapidly emerging as one of Canada’s major talents with highly acclaimed exhibitions in Cleveland, New York and Toronto during the past year.  The current show continues her exploration of shamanistic themes using paint, collage, wood and metal.

Gloria Trujillo, Arcturus’ curator says “Maguire’s art unites the restless tension of modern abstraction and the primitive quality of traditional art in much the same way that Picasso’s Toros were quintessentially modern yet so astonishingly like the cave art at Lascaux.  The shapes are tenuous and unstable, expressing simultaneous formation and dissolution which suggest the uncertainties of both primordial existence and modern life”. Although these two periods of time are far distant from each other, Maguire has found their complementary echoes in these mixed media paintings with their deep, rich tonalities, alternating transparent glazes and opaque layers.

Maguire notes that her aim in the works is “to lead the viewer to respond subconsciously to a forgotten, primal archetypal language.  By virtue of their abstract quality and thus their allusiveness of image, I hope these works will engage viewers and awaken in them an emotive response to universal myth”.

Exhibition

SPIRIT FORMS

by Andrea Maguire           

GALLERY ARCTURUS

October 1 - November 1, 1997

Opening Reception: Friday, October 3, 5:30 - 8:30 pm

Toronto artist Andrea Maguire uses abstract forms with the primal textures and colours of ancient art to evoke the most elemental archetypes of human artistic expression in Spirit Forms, the new exhibition at Gallery Arcturus.

Andrea Maguire is rapidly emerging as one of Canada’s major talents with highly acclaimed exhibitions in Cleveland, New York and Toronto during the past year.  The current show continues her exploration of shamanistic themes using paint, collage, wood and metal.

Gloria Trujillo, Arcturus’ curator says “Maguire’s art unites the restless tension of modern abstraction and the primitive quality of traditional art in much the same way that Picasso’s Toros were quintessentially modern yet so astonishingly like the cave art at Lascaux.  The shapes are tenuous and unstable, expressing simultaneous formation and dissolution which suggest the uncertainties of both primordial existence and modern life”. Although these two periods of time are far distant from each other, Maguire has found their complementary echoes in these mixed media paintings with their deep, rich tonalities, alternating transparent glazes and opaque layers.

Maguire notes that her aim in the works is “to lead the viewer to respond subconsciously to a forgotten, primal archetypal language.  By virtue of their abstract quality and thus their allusiveness of image, I hope these works will engage viewers and awaken in them an emotive response to universal myth”.

Spirit Forms Spirit Forms Andrea Maguire

Slightly Off the Wall

Wed Sep 3 00:00:00 1997

 

BIOGRAPHIES

Stephanie Boyd

Stephanie Louise Boyd was born and raised in south California.  As a dancer and musician, she became involved in politically committed performance art at the University of California’s San Diego campus.  She later travelled around the United States and performed rallies and on street corners.  Boyd returned to California and attended UCSC where she gained a solid understanding of art history and philosophy.  She travelled through Europe visiting the major museums, painting in Spain and becoming involved in some performance art in Amsterdam.  Returning to the United States she joined the School of Reductionism and continues to work in many mediums, music being an integral part of her work.          

Mark Einert

As the son of a science professor, Mark leaned the art of grinding scientific lenses and cutting and polishing gems at a young age.  He was influenced by the worlds of both hard science and science fiction.  He apprenticed as a professional glassblower at the Bryan Maytum studio in Boulder, Colorado where he eventually trained several apprentices himself.  After being exposed to Reductionism and to the work of Brancusi, Mark saw new directions in which to expand.  The fluid style of his glass and the elegance of the shapes are also due in part to his interest in Tai Chi and the linking of breath with bodily motion.  His freeform glass sculptures follow the lead of the materials and techniques themselves.  The show how molten glass can flow in space.

Della Heywood

Born in Vancouver, Della’s primary interest from early childhood was art.  She attended the Emily Carr School of Art and Capilano College where she studied a variety of artistic mediums.  In her development as an artist, Della was influenced by the Impressionists, Post-Impressionists and the Surrealists.  This is revealed in her love of light, intensity of colour and appreciation for dream-like realities.  Her paintings document her quest to strip away habitual cognition and enter into the magical world behind and within ordinary perception.  Della currently lives in California and has become one of the most accomplished members of the School of Reductionism.

Kelly Rivera

Born in Puerto Rico, she studied art and theatre at the University of Maryland and then move to New York City where she worked professionally in both mediums.  Rivera considers Rico Lebrun, Tom Johnson and E.J. Gold as having had the greatest influence on her work.  She also has been inspired by tantric art in its use of colour and stylization.  In her most recent works, we can see references to the symbolist and Pre-Raphaelite imagery of Dante Gabriel Rossetti.  She uses art as a “means to access a world that is usually unseen”.  Many of Rivera’s works are influenced by her vivid dreams, past and present.  She has been a member of the School of Reductionism for 12 years.

Douglass-Truth

Douglas-Truth was born in Indianapolis.  Under the mistaken impression that he was colour blind, he pursued a wide variety of professions before becoming an artist.  After this misconception was corrected he began his artistic studies in earnest, discovering in the process that “I have never me a colour I didn’t like”.  In 1969, he founded the Douglass-Truth Institute, publishing text, illustrations and manufacturing and distributing promotional items.  Truth has travelled and researched extensively throughout Asia, reviving the Japanese Doronto printmaking method in the process.  His stories and articles have been published in a wide range of magazines such as Boing-Boing, Possessed and Talking Raven.  He is an active member of the School of Reductionism.

Tom X (Johnson)

Tom X is a well known artist with many of his paintings in major American and European collections.  During the seventies, Tom X explored figurative distortions and perspective.  In 1976 his work was exhibited at the Denver Art Museum with shows following in New York, Sacramento and Vancouver.  In the late seventies he entered a Cubist phase which reached an aesthetic height with his bronze sculpture, “The Jester”.  Tom X ventured into printmaking during the eighties and his silkscreen prints projected a dark mood reminiscent of Erich Heckel and George Rouault.  In the late eighties he joined E.J. Gold and helped formulate the Manifesto of Reductionism.  His current works are electrifying with colourful figures and heavy black lines.  The work of Tom X pushes the boundaries and provides an original synthesis of tradition with a post-modernist outlook.  He now works out of Los Angeles, New York and Germany.

Yanesh

Yanesh was born and raised in Montreal.  She initially entered the creative life through the portal of haute coiffure working in high fashion salons such as Bib, La Coupe and Vidal Sassoon.  She later became an art consultant and owner of the Troov Art Gallery in New York City.  Having moved to California to study with the School of Reductionism, she works as an artist, mainly in sculpture and ceramics.  Yanesh also paints, works in pastel and charcoal and has recently shown her work in Los Angeles, Nevada City, Vancouver and New York.

SCHOOL OF REDUCTIONISM

Conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist's community in northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse its works with recognizable qualities.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being.  It is then the artist's task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience.  Reductionist art is therefore objective in nature and not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Artists of the School include: E.J. Gold, Della Heywood, Kelly Rivera, Heather Valencia, Stephanie Boyd, Menlo Macfarlane, Robbert Trice, Tom X., Claude Needham, Zoe Alowan, Richard Hart, Mark Einert, Douglass-Truth, Yanesh, Lidy Nova, Joe Alowan, Tim Elston, David Christie and more.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

Essentialism

Reductionism uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational.  However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves.  The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism.  Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract.  Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect.  Colours are few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or "horizontal" but eternal or "vertical"...the same dimension of  time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass.  The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their inter-relationships.  Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling...motion through emotion.

Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of  perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space.  The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer.  Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it.  Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it.  Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.  Thus, the art is only completed by viewing.

SLIGHTLY OFF THE WALL

The School of Reductionism

GALLERY ARCTURUS

September 3 - 27, 1997

Eleven artists of the California-based School of Reductionism explore altered reality in SlightlyOff The Wall, a new exhibition of painting and sculpture at Gallery Arcturus.

The works range from the hauntingly surrealistic landscapes of Canadian Della Heywood to the bizarre dwellings of American Douglass-Truth and the fluid elegance of scultpture by Mark Einert.  Also, included are four dramatic pieces by Tom X, an increasingly well known artist noted for his strong, uncompromising figures, relentless energy and mastery of line and colour.  His works have been shown throughout the United States, Germany and Japan and are now being exhibited for the first time in Toronto.

The exhibition also incorporates the powerful figurative work of Kelly Rivera, the soft, allusive canvases of Stephanie Boyd and four striking bronze torsos by Montreal sculptor Yanesh.

The School of Reductionism is an exciting new movement in contemporary art.  The School was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist’s community in Northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who are working with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Exhibition, Group Show

SLIGHTLY OFF THE WALL

The School of Reductionism

GALLERY ARCTURUS

September 3 - 27, 1997

Eleven artists of the California-based School of Reductionism explore altered reality in SlightlyOff The Wall, a new exhibition of painting and sculpture at Gallery Arcturus.

The works range from the hauntingly surrealistic landscapes of Canadian Della Heywood to the bizarre dwellings of American Douglass-Truth and the fluid elegance of scultpture by Mark Einert.  Also, included are four dramatic pieces by Tom X, an increasingly well known artist noted for his strong, uncompromising figures, relentless energy and mastery of line and colour.  His works have been shown throughout the United States, Germany and Japan and are now being exhibited for the first time in Toronto.

The exhibition also incorporates the powerful figurative work of Kelly Rivera, the soft, allusive canvases of Stephanie Boyd and four striking bronze torsos by Montreal sculptor Yanesh.

The School of Reductionism is an exciting new movement in contemporary art.  The School was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, a prominent American artist, and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group, an artist’s community in Northern California.  The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who are working with Gold to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Slightly Off the Wall Slightly Off the Wall

Large As Life

Wed Jul 30 00:00:00 1997

Thursday, July 31, 5:30 - 8:30pm

LARGE AS LIFE

by E.J. Gold

GALLERY ARCTURUS

July 30 - August 30, 1997

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 31, 5:30 - 8:30pm

Toronto... Walk among life-size images of alien beings in Large As Life, the new E.J. Gold exhibition at Gallery Arcturus.  These stretched canvases from Gold’s Monumental Series stand three dimensionally on the gallery floor as a labyrinth inviting the viewer to become lost in other worlds.

Gold calls these works “vertical glimpses of horizontal reality”.  In them he uses a recurrent stylistic element in his work: crowding the figure with the ground and using negative space to define the figure.  “The figure is the void which we crowd with the ground into a morphology of contractions and expansions, endlessly waveforming into new and interesting morphologies”, says Gold.

E.J. Gold is a contemporary U.S. painter with a reputation for experimentation.  His teachers and mentors include some of the most important pioneers of contemporary art – New York School luminaries Frank Kline and Willem de Kooning, Rico Lebrun, Bentley Schaad and Fritz Schwaderer, the noted German Expressionist.

Exhibition

LARGE AS LIFE

by E.J. Gold

GALLERY ARCTURUS

July 30 - August 30, 1997

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 31, 5:30 - 8:30pm

Toronto... Walk among life-size images of alien beings in Large As Life, the new E.J. Gold exhibition at Gallery Arcturus.  These stretched canvases from Gold’s Monumental Series stand three dimensionally on the gallery floor as a labyrinth inviting the viewer to become lost in other worlds.

Gold calls these works “vertical glimpses of horizontal reality”.  In them he uses a recurrent stylistic element in his work: crowding the figure with the ground and using negative space to define the figure.  “The figure is the void which we crowd with the ground into a morphology of contractions and expansions, endlessly waveforming into new and interesting morphologies”, says Gold.

E.J. Gold is a contemporary U.S. painter with a reputation for experimentation.  His teachers and mentors include some of the most important pioneers of contemporary art – New York School luminaries Frank Kline and Willem de Kooning, Rico Lebrun, Bentley Schaad and Fritz Schwaderer, the noted German Expressionist.

Large As Life Large As Life E.J. Gold

there is no there: Jeremy Gordaneer

Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 2011

Saturday, October 1, 2:30 - 5:30pm

Is everything connected?

Painter/sculptor Jeremy Gordaneer explores this question, as he asks us to follow an emerging and disappearing train, travelling through unfolding landscapes. This continuum of impressions is painted on ten 4 by 6 foot panels creating an epic 50 foot mural entitled, 'There is No There'.

The work began January 2010 in Jeremy's Mile End studio in Montreal and was completed at Gallery Arcturus during the last week of September.

Also on display: Painting Small Things, a series in oil on wood.   View the images HERE.

Jeremy Gordaneer at work

Exhibition

there is no there: Jeremy Gordaneer 320 there is no there: Jeremy Gordaneer Jeremy Gordaneer

Peter Chung

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

http://peterchungart.com/                   

Born and educated in Hong Kong, Peter has been working as a full-time artist in Toronto since 1996. He was one of the founding members and former instructor at the Hong Kong Institute of Visual Art In Hong Kong. Peter has won numerous awards for his works in advertising and oil painting. A strong background in graphic design has led him to develop a style of painting that is rich in color and reveals a strong balance of form and composition.

Peter's previous work's subject matter ranged widely from traditional still-lifes to various landscapes and figuratives. Now Peter paints houses to represent people. The houses always have small windows as eyes and without doors to signify modern man's need for privacy.

The paintings with two houses represent lovers; with big and small houses as families and many houses as relatives and friends to suggest people living in harmony with one another. As lovers, one house is shadowing -protecting- the other as sign of wellingness to sacrifice for love. The paintings sometimes have dark and disturbed backgrounds to suggest turmoil in life that we have to face in order to grow stronger, or peaceful backgrounds with graphics telling stories of the houses, such as: squares are like photo-frames now framing memories of the houses;circles or stripes are flashes of memories or timeline and sparkles are energies their positive happy mode generated.

A rewarding light shines on the houses to represent a blessing for their love and celebration of a happy life!

Artist

Peter Chung Peter Chung

Claustro

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Carol Currie and Stuart Leggett  -- "Claustro"

The collaboration between Carol Currie and Stuart Leggett is a celebration between an artist and a sculptor and their shared love of nature. They hold the intent to create tactile living paintings that invite interactive and intimate experience with the viewing.

Their passion for adventurous trekking and nature offers them an insightful interpretation of nature, which has become the seal of their shared art. Carol provides sketches that are made from a collection of reference photos taken while on trips and together they choose the style of the piece. Stuart starts the wood working process by creating a solid wood panel through a long method of laminating small strips of wood. He develops natural wood grain textures to bring an organic essence to his pieces and compliments this textural components by relief carving and sculpting shifts in planes that cast shadows within the painting. Stuart then carefully protects all surfaces to ensure the panel is of archival quality. This process ensures a stable and permanent foundation for Carol’s paints. Carol then applies up to seven translucent layers of fluid acrylics to build illusionary depths in the painting, bringing the sculpture to life.

See a slideshow of the work process here: http://www.claustro.ca/claustro_piece_075/

Their artistic mission is to remove the industrial noises and provide a bond between the seeing and the nature being depicted in the art.

http://www.claustro.ca/

Artist

Claustro Claustro

Marie Fournier

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available for Marie Fournier at this time.

Marie Fournier Marie Fournier

Camie Geary-Martin

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Camie Geary-Martin was born in Kingston, Ontario in 1954 and during her childhood she lived in many cities in Canada, England and Germany. After studying theatre arts in her twenties, Camie worked in theatre and sewed costumes for The National Ballet of Canada.

In 1999 she began studies at the Toronto School of Art and afterwards Pasadena City College. In 2000 she sculpted a bust of Dr. Ursula Franklin which was cast in bronze for the Toronto District School Board. The following year she received a commission to create a bronze bust for St. Mary’s Church in Toronto.

Camie’s sculptures are now enjoyed in many private and public collections throughout North America.

http://camie.ca/

Artist

Camie Geary-Martin Camie Geary-Martin

Ayokah

Mon Mar 3 00:00:00 2014

No biography is available at this time.

Artist

Ayokah Ayokah

James LaTrobe

Mon Mar 3 00:00:00 2014

Artist

James LaTrobe James LaTrobe

Eric McConnachie

Mon Mar 3 00:00:00 2014

Eric McConnachie is a northern Ontario artist who lives and works in the area west of Algonquin Park.
He has adopted the medium and tools of one of his mentors, Tom Thomson. Most of McConnachie’s works are done on small wood panels, painted while surrounded by the environment from which he is nourished. He is able to bring an energy and immediacy to all of his works; the weather as it changes through all the seasons, the light as it shifts from morning to evening. Each is a small window into a wilderness which still exists on the periphery.

Artist

Eric McConnachie Eric McConnachie

Adrian Symonds

Mon Mar 3 00:00:00 2014

From 2014:

In the late ‘90’s I sculpted wooden body prayers in an attempt to experience the attributes of the Divine. The body prayers were based on the invocational postures as described in the work of E. J. Gold.

In 2000, I moved to the northwest coast of Canada and discovered a veritable treasure trove of driftwood. I abandoned my chisels, bought a chainsaw, and started pulling logs off the beach. My interest in Tibetan meditation found me carving Buddhist Seed Syllables from the mantra Oh-Ah-Hung and Om Mani Padme Hum. The three sculptures below are, from foreground to background, OM-Ah and Hung.

Since 1993, I have focused upon the art of body movement. I love doing push hands, the martial aspect of tai chi. It’s a great mechanism to explore balance, power, sensitivity and to experience the diverse variety of subtle intents that working with a partner can offer. It’s sort of like a mixture of personality psychotherapy reflected in movement and ballroom dancing… with the intention of knocking your partner flat on their back… with a smile of course. 

Artist

Adrian Symonds Adrian Symonds

Dan Walsh

Mon Mar 3 00:00:00 2014

Artist

Dan Walsh Dan Walsh

small songs

Wed Mar 4 02:00:00 2015

Saturday, March 14

miniature collages and eight-foot columns: two new shows at downtown Toronto’s Gallery Arcturus

“r e t u r n i n g   h o m e” in the Genesis Gallery and “small songs” by Louie Vargas in the Collage Gallery

TORONTO


There is a double reception at Toronto’s hard-to-categorize Gallery Arcturus this Saturday, March 14 for two exhibits: small songs brings miniature collage works to the second floor and returning home fills the first-floor Genesis Gallery.

Of returning home, gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris says, “In this installation of forms and paintings there are seven characters on a journey; seven pillars serve as guide posts, seven stones as markers. The travellers are returning home, over water, over land, through wind and rain, sun and moon.” The journey begins in a painting by Chris Langstroth entitled ‘Fairgrounds’, one of the gallery’s permanent collection works. The pillars were created by Ramona Zoladek in November 2014 and first exhibited at that time.

The story continues with new paintings and a light installation by deborah harris. At the conclusion, those travelling realize that the home they have struggled to carry is a light they each hold within. They have returned to themselves. This exhibit imperceptibly leads the viewer through the space to encounter another form, another painting -- each one a surprise. Says harris, “If [the installation] adheres to a story it is not one that is required reading. Walking through the gallery recreates the sensation of the journey.” Showing in the Collage Gallery on the second floor is collage miniatures by Louie Vargas.

Each of these works is a precisely crafted jewel of the medium, earning this collection its title ‘small songs’. Vargas was first introduced to collage in workshops hosted by the gallery -- which he continues to attend. These are held monthly on Saturdays. This heritage structure on Gerrard Street has three other gallery spaces dedicated to a particular artist or theme. All of which can make a visit to Arcturus memorable in a powerful and particular way … a way that can be hard to set in words.

The reception for “r e t u r n i n g   h o m e” and “small songs” will be held in the basement studio on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5 pm. Wine and cheese as well as espresso and treats will be served. Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University -- in the “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m.


A video introduction to small songs, the collages of Louie Vargas: https://youtu.be/XO6IheG8M2s

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus
On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus 

More on Ramona Zoladek: http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/ http://ramonazoladek.com/
More on deborah harris: http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?id=18#masonry_outer 

Please contact the gallery for any needed high-resolution images.

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 14, 2 to 5 p.m.
Exhibit runs March 6 to April 18, 2015 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm 

Media contact: Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca


Gallery Arcturus,
80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto,
Ontario M5B 1G6 416-977-1077
http://arcturus.ca/

Exhibition

miniature collages and eight-foot columns: two new shows at downtown Toronto’s Gallery Arcturus

“r e t u r n i n g   h o m e” in the Genesis Gallery and “small songs” by Louie Vargas in the Collage Gallery

TORONTO


There is a double reception at Toronto’s hard-to-categorize Gallery Arcturus this Saturday, March 14 for two exhibits: small songs brings miniature collage works to the second floor and returning home fills the first-floor Genesis Gallery.

Of returning home, gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris says, “In this installation of forms and paintings there are seven characters on a journey; seven pillars serve as guide posts, seven stones as markers. The travellers are returning home, over water, over land, through wind and rain, sun and moon.” The journey begins in a painting by Chris Langstroth entitled ‘Fairgrounds’, one of the gallery’s permanent collection works. The pillars were created by Ramona Zoladek in November 2014 and first exhibited at that time.

The story continues with new paintings and a light installation by deborah harris. At the conclusion, those travelling realize that the home they have struggled to carry is a light they each hold within. They have returned to themselves. This exhibit imperceptibly leads the viewer through the space to encounter another form, another painting -- each one a surprise. Says harris, “If [the installation] adheres to a story it is not one that is required reading. Walking through the gallery recreates the sensation of the journey.” Showing in the Collage Gallery on the second floor is collage miniatures by Louie Vargas.

Each of these works is a precisely crafted jewel of the medium, earning this collection its title ‘small songs’. Vargas was first introduced to collage in workshops hosted by the gallery -- which he continues to attend. These are held monthly on Saturdays. This heritage structure on Gerrard Street has three other gallery spaces dedicated to a particular artist or theme. All of which can make a visit to Arcturus memorable in a powerful and particular way … a way that can be hard to set in words.

The reception for “r e t u r n i n g   h o m e” and “small songs” will be held in the basement studio on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5 pm. Wine and cheese as well as espresso and treats will be served. Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University -- in the “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m.


A video introduction to small songs, the collages of Louie Vargas: https://youtu.be/XO6IheG8M2s

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus
On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus 

More on Ramona Zoladek: http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/ http://ramonazoladek.com/
More on deborah harris: http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?id=18#masonry_outer 

Please contact the gallery for any needed high-resolution images.

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 14, 2 to 5 p.m.
Exhibit runs March 6 to April 18, 2015 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm 

Media contact: Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca


Gallery Arcturus,
80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto,
Ontario M5B 1G6 416-977-1077
http://arcturus.ca/

small songs 160 small songs Louie Vargas small songs XO6IheG8M2s visual sound poetry

small songs

Fri Mar 6 00:00:00 2015

collage miniatures by Louie Vargas

exhibit on through April 18, 2015 and reception on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5 pm

miniature collages and eight-foot columns: two new shows at downtown Toronto’s Gallery Arcturus

- “r e t u r n i n g h o m e” in the Genesis Gallery and “small songs” by Louie Vargas in the Collage Gallery TORONTO

– There is a double reception at Toronto’s hard-to-categorize Gallery Arcturus this Saturday, March 14 for two exhibits: small songs brings miniature collage works to the second floor and returning home fills the first-floor Genesis Gallery.

Of returning home, gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris says, “In this installation of forms and paintings there are seven characters on a journey; seven pillars serve as guide posts, seven stones as markers. The travellers are returning home, over water, over land, through wind and rain, sun and moon.” The journey begins in a painting by Chris Langstroth entitled ‘Fairgrounds’, one of the gallery’s permanent collection works. The pillars were created by Ramona Zoladek in November 2014 and first exhibited at that time.

The story continues with new paintings and a light installation by deborah harris. At the conclusion, those travelling realize that the home they have struggled to carry is a light they each hold within. They have returned to themselves. This exhibit imperceptibly leads the viewer through the space to encounter another form, another painting -- each one a surprise. Says harris, “If [the installation] adheres to a story it is not one that is required reading. Walking through the gallery recreates the sensation of the journey.” Showing in the Collage Gallery on the second floor is collage miniatures by Louie Vargas.

Each of these works is a precisely crafted jewel of the medium, earning this collection its title ‘small songs’. Vargas was first introduced to collage in workshops hosted by the gallery -- which he continues to attend. These are held monthly on Saturdays. This heritage structure on Gerrard Street has three other gallery spaces dedicated to a particular artist or theme. All of which can make a visit to Arcturus memorable in a powerful and particular way … a way that can be hard to set in words.

The reception for “r e t u r n i n g h o m e” and “small songs” will be held in the basement studio on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5 pm. Wine and cheese as well as espresso and treats will be served. Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University -- in the “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m.

-- -- A video introduction to small songs, the collages of Louie Vargas: https://youtu.be/XO6IheG8M2s

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus
On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus 

More on Ramona Zoladek: http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/ http://ramonazoladek.com/

More on deborah harris: http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?id=18#masonry_outer 

Please contact the gallery for any needed high-resolution images.

-- Opening Reception: Saturday, March 14, 2 to 5 p.m.
Exhibit runs March 6 to April 18, 2015 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm 

Media contact: Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

Gallery Arcturus,
80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto,
Ontario M5B 1G6 416-977-1077
http://arcturus.ca/

miniature collages and eight-foot columns: two new shows at downtown Toronto’s Gallery Arcturus

- “r e t u r n i n g h o m e” in the Genesis Gallery and “small songs” by Louie Vargas in the Collage Gallery TORONTO

– There is a double reception at Toronto’s hard-to-categorize Gallery Arcturus this Saturday, March 14 for two exhibits: small songs brings miniature collage works to the second floor and returning home fills the first-floor Genesis Gallery.

Of returning home, gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris says, “In this installation of forms and paintings there are seven characters on a journey; seven pillars serve as guide posts, seven stones as markers. The travellers are returning home, over water, over land, through wind and rain, sun and moon.” The journey begins in a painting by Chris Langstroth entitled ‘Fairgrounds’, one of the gallery’s permanent collection works. The pillars were created by Ramona Zoladek in November 2014 and first exhibited at that time.

The story continues with new paintings and a light installation by deborah harris. At the conclusion, those travelling realize that the home they have struggled to carry is a light they each hold within. They have returned to themselves. This exhibit imperceptibly leads the viewer through the space to encounter another form, another painting -- each one a surprise. Says harris, “If [the installation] adheres to a story it is not one that is required reading. Walking through the gallery recreates the sensation of the journey.” Showing in the Collage Gallery on the second floor is collage miniatures by Louie Vargas.

Each of these works is a precisely crafted jewel of the medium, earning this collection its title ‘small songs’. Vargas was first introduced to collage in workshops hosted by the gallery -- which he continues to attend. These are held monthly on Saturdays. This heritage structure on Gerrard Street has three other gallery spaces dedicated to a particular artist or theme. All of which can make a visit to Arcturus memorable in a powerful and particular way … a way that can be hard to set in words.

The reception for “r e t u r n i n g h o m e” and “small songs” will be held in the basement studio on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5 pm. Wine and cheese as well as espresso and treats will be served. Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University -- in the “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m.

-- -- A video introduction to small songs, the collages of Louie Vargas: https://youtu.be/XO6IheG8M2s

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus
On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus 

More on Ramona Zoladek: http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/ http://ramonazoladek.com/

More on deborah harris: http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?id=18#masonry_outer 

Please contact the gallery for any needed high-resolution images.

-- Opening Reception: Saturday, March 14, 2 to 5 p.m.
Exhibit runs March 6 to April 18, 2015 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm 

Media contact: Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

Gallery Arcturus,
80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto,
Ontario M5B 1G6 416-977-1077
http://arcturus.ca/

small songs small songs

returning home

Wed Mar 4 02:00:00 2015

Saturday, March 14, 2 5pm

r e t u r n i n g    h o m e  -- An installation of sculpture and new paintings.

The exhibit runs through April 18 and a reception is on Saturday, March 14 from 2 to 5pm.

In this story there are seven characters on the journey, seven pillars as guide posts, seven stones as markers. The travellers (depicted in paintings by deborah harris) are returning home, over water, over land, through wind and rain, sun and moon.

In the end those travelling realize that the home they have struggled to carry is a light they each hold within. They have returned to themselves.

--

Please see a video inspired by this exhibit here

Exhibition

returning home 200 returning home returning home J910l4uDPro exhibit

Ramona Zoladek

Tue Mar 11 00:00:00 2014

http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/

 My practice explores the relationship between nature, architecture and objects. It revolves around ideas of growth and ruin and the history exposed by these objects as they interact with nature. The tension between solid building materials and organic matter is obvious and naive but at the same time fascinating. I pay particular attention to those prominent features of the landscape which are supposed to be familiar but are not easily recognisable. These are often parts of buildings once were constructed for the purpose of habitation, they are now abandoned places, overgrown by nature; crumbling, decaying, becoming part of the landscape. As a result, they lose their function and therefore change their meaning.

 The choice of materials and processes I use refer to my personal experiences and memories of growing up in Poland. My physical journey to the places and research into history is essential and it drives my practice. I depict landscape in my sculptures by physically applying soil and clay within my work and compose with plaster, paint and often organic materials and seeds to create new objects which have their own life. The unusual combination of those materials leads to other processes such as shrinking, expansion, growth and decay.

 I repetitively use the form of plinths to shape casts used in my work. Through this traditional sculptural process I formalise the combination of plaster and seeds which then become part of the gallery space. I 'destroy' these forms and materials associated with traditional sculpture, by spraying them with paint and plaster and then reconstructing into different forms.

 Time, process and material are particularly important aspects of my work. Each piece I construct demands structured planning and a dedicated set-up of its individual environment. However, even though I try to control this, there is always an element of unpredictability that emerges. The pieces I construct often appear vulnerable, as though they are about to collapse or fall apart.

 I often create my work from a reflection on the different architectural forms found within a particular place. The narratives surrounding these places are not obviously reflected in my new work, rather they are suggested by symbolic elements that are translated from one to another.

2014

Artist

Ramona Zoladek Ramona Zoladek

Christopher Griffin

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

christophergriffin.ca                                                                   From 2003:

In my extensive travels, language barriers have kept me from completely understanding new and foreign cultures and landscapes. This barrier has forced me to rely on visual cues and impressions to form my perceptions. As a result, I am able to re-examine my own society, environment and culture.

My recent journey to West Papua, Indonesia on the island of Papua New Guinea has been the most inspiring. As one of the last pristine environments left on earth, the Papuans offer a glimpse of what it means to be human: self sufficient, independent and free from the pressures of modern life. Sadly, this celebration of early man will disappear in our lifetime, directly because of outside influence.

The Papuans do not live in fear of their natural world. They drink from the rivers, breathe the air and eat food from the soil with no trepidation. In contrast, we of the western world are living with increasing fear of these basic necessities of life as we ourselves are poisoning them. Air, water, earth. We disregard and disrespect these building blocks of life at our own peril.

This exposure to a spiritual, fundamental existence has caused me to re-examine my own work. I have become more involved in the actual process of creating. I am allowing the accidental and unconscious to guide my work. I am having fun. Although, warning signals of impending environmental and cultural loss are hinted at or fully exposed in my paintings, this does not clash with the joy of creating and the joy of living. My intent is not to jump on a soap box, nor to ignore our grave global dilemmas, but to be able to communicate to the viewer just enough to allow them to come to their own similar interpretations.

Artist

Christopher Griffin Christopher Griffin

Scott Griffin

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available at this time for Scott Griffin.

http://www.diggiemoon.com/the_griffin_bros/scott_griffin/index.htm

Artist

Scott Griffin Scott Griffin

Marni Grossman

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

marnigrossman.com                                                  From 2007:

One of Canada’s leading photographers in film and television, Toronto born Marni Grossman has spent a lifetime behind the lens. Her work has been published worldwide for use as cover and poster art as well as appearing in most film and tv magazines.

Driven to seeing beyond - both personally and photographically, Grossman has the remarkable ability to capture the essence of humanity and the infinite subtleties of nature. Her heart is tied to the elements which are reflective in the light, color, texture and depth of her artistry.

Through her life experience and extensive travel, Grossman has transitioned and developed as a fine art photographer. Her trip to west Africa in 2003 opened her heart and inspired her creatively. Through the lens, she began to document what she saw and felt. Her love of bears and passion for preserving our environment have inspired her to travel to some of the most remote areas of Canada.

Grossman has connected with the fine art community and environmental organizations selling and donating her works. Grossmans’ most recent travels took her to our Canadian North to document the magnificent and endangered Polar Bears.

Artist

Marni Grossman Marni Grossman

Lenka Holubec

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Born in the Czech Republic, Lenka Holubec studied at the Film and Video Department of York University in Toronto. She worked as an independent filmmaker developing feature and documentary projects. Still photography always held a strong appeal to her as a tool of powerful visual expression so she has increasingly devoted herself to this field.

A strong bond with nature inspires and nourishes her photography work to a great extent. This relationship has become even stronger after her arrival to Canada, thirty years ago, when she traveled along the Great Lakes for the first time. The lakes’ powerful magic touched her deeply. It was a feeling of being at home at the place where she has never been before.

Photographing the various elements of nature remains a very intense and revealing experience to her as it involves a process of achieving a unity and harmony between the surrounding environment and oneself. The images then echo her pursuit to capture and preserve the meaning of what she sees and experiences. Perhaps traces of this meaning can be found embedded in the details of rocks, the world of reflections, water images, landscapes or still life.

http://photosharedvisions.com/

Artist

Lenka Holubec Lenka Holubec

Randy Hryhorczuk

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Randy Hryhorczuk is a Canadian visual artist born in Vancouver, British Columbia. He grew up in the rural countryside and later lived in the City of Vancouver before moving to Toronto in order to focus on painting.

Randy is a self-taught oil painter. He has been showing publicly since 2000 in Canada, the United States and Germany. His artwork has been collected privately in Canada, the United States, Great Britain and Guatemala. Randy currently paints full time.

http://www.hryhorczuk.com/

Artist

Randy Hryhorczuk Randy Hryhorczuk

Louis Irkok Jr.

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available for Louis Irkok Jr. at this time.

Louis Irkok Jr. Louis Irkok Jr.

Joseph Kary

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available for Joseph Kary at this time.

Joseph Kary Joseph Kary

Olena Kassian

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

http://www.olenakassian.com/                                              From 2008:

I was born outside of Munich, Germany, of Ukrainian parentage, in 1947. I arrived at Pier 21 in Halifax in 1954, with my parents and a bundle of goods stuffed into a tin washtub. I had a small suitcase. And my teddy bear.

My studies have included Drawing and Painting at the Ontario College of Art, and Fine Art and Philosophy at the University of Guelph.

My work as an illustrator encompasses the worlds of animation, publishing, and advertising – I joke that Loblaws is one of my art galleries, with labels for Del Monte, President’s Choice, McCain, and many others on the shelves. I have painted highly realistic billboards that have appeared from Hong Kong Harbour to the walls of tall buildings in Toronto. I have published 17 children’s books and have an ongoing relationship with a new book about a dog – that resists completion!

I began to draw with mylar and graphite as a result of the need to articulate the emotional and existential fallout resulting from a profound loss. I needed a form that reflected my inner life in a way that my illustration practice could not. Because the nature of the work was very intimate, I had no desire to exhibit. Apart from a one-man show at the Canadian Sculpture Gallery (at the invitation of the director) and a couple of small group shows, I have kept a low profile. Now, at a time of life when many people would retire, I have made my personal work a primary focus.

Artist

Olena Kassian Olena Kassian

Dongmin Lai

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

http://www.lloydgallery.com/lai/lai.htm                                    From 2007:

Painting in what could be described as an “Old Masters”, almost Renaissance style, Dongmin Lai demonstrates a mastery of brushwork that is both direct and spontaneous. Many of his works depicting a rural lifestyle in China make it appear almost medieval in its apparent lack of modernization.

Born in China in 1957, Dongmin received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Beijing Teacher’s University and studied at China’s Academy of Fine Arts. In 1986 he became a member of the Chinese Fine Art Association and proceeded to hold several shows in the National Gallery and the Capitol Museum in Beijing. Two of his paintings were chosen for the Museum’s permanent collection. In October of 1991 he was awarded China’s prestigious Silver Medal for oil painting.

Dongmin Lai paints in very deep, rich colours and as well as his scenes of country life, he paints Chinese landscape including the canals of Suchow. He also paints exquisite, finely detailed portraits.

He has been painting professionally for about 20 years, the last 14 of which have been spent in British Columbia. His work may be found in private and corporate collections in China, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, the United States and Canada.

Artist

Dongmin Lai Dongmin Lai

Gabriel Lalonde

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Gabriel Lalonde is a multi-disciplinary artist from Quebec City. Self taught, Gabriel has dedicated almost 30 years entirely to his relationship with Art. Visual artist, author and poet, he weaves words and visual art to evoke form, line and image. He has exhibited in Canada, USA, France, Germany and England and frequently participates in readings throughout Canada and Europe. He engages with a variety of media to offer an eclectic expression which conveys a richness in surface texture.

http://www.gabriellalonde.blogspot.com/

Artist

Gabriel Lalonde Gabriel Lalonde

Chris Langstroth

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Chris Langstroth is a Toronto-based artist who works primarily in acrylics.

‘From a distance, Chris Langstroth’s works are stunning abstract paintings, but look closer and you’ll see distinct human shapes. By using thick paint and knives to apply multiple wet layers or dig through existing layers, he leaves evidence of his process in the finished product’.
by Alison Malone. “WHERE” magazine, 2007.

Preview magazine, November 2008 issue:
“This year, I have been concentrating, increasingly, on ways of representing the human figure (in whole or part).

I enjoy the physicality of thick paint and use knives to smear on one wet layer over another or to excavate through existing layers. Although I strive for a certain ‘visual plausibility’ in my work, representational accuracy is not my prime objective.

The most enigmatic and interesting qualities particular to painting, have to do with the transformation of pigment in paste to an image on canvas. I am, therefore seeking to retain some visual evidence of the process used in making the image as a subtext for reading or interpreting it.

In each painting, I’m searching for the most compelling combination of imagery and abstract paint quality,” says Chris Langstroth.

http://www.kurbatoffgallery.com/langstroth/0.htm

Artist

Chris Langstroth Chris Langstroth

Ruth Luginbuehl

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

 

From the 2004 show Seeking Vision:

Ruth Luginbuehl was born in Switzerland. She completed her studies in medicine and pediatrics at the University of Basel and in Fine Art at the School of Arts in Lucerne. She has since brought together the healing of art with children as an art therapist here in Toronto. Her work is an exuberant and joyful exploration and inquiry. It is her intention to return to the Far North, paints and brushes in hand, in the late spring.

Ruth Luginbuehl Ruth Luginbuehl

Sharon Naidos

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available for Sharon Naidos at this time.

http://www.naidos.ca/

Sharon Naidos Sharon Naidos

Joachim Oepkes

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Joachim Oepkes is a former communications and art professor at Sheridan College who has shown his slide installations and photo exhibitions in a variety of venues in Toronto. He says of his unique perceptions of graffiti art; “My abstractions unseal imaginary visions seeking spiritual wealth.”

Artist

Joachim Oepkes Joachim Oepkes

Paul Saari

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

Paul writes of his work: “It is often the case that we forget we are as much a part of nature as the earth under our feet; on which we by no means tread lightly.  In this latest series of work I have been interested in our relationship with the natural world.  The human footprint – our ingenuity, our psyche, and our actions – is represented here by houses reduced to an archetypical form and re-contextualized as patterns in nature.”

 

http://www.paulsaari.com/

Artist

Paul Saari Paul Saari

R.C. Trice

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

R.C. TRICE was born in Vancouver in 1957.  He is a painter, sculptor, actor, puppeteer, musician, art conservator and picture framer.  His work ranges from haunting and shadowy canvases to his highly original series Bag People, character portraits on ordinary brown paper bags, now available in ceramics as well.  His work rests upon a lifetime of studying classical European and Oriental traditions.  Robbert’s works have recently been exhibited in Vancouver, New York, Chicago, Sacramento, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Toronto.  He also serves as the President of Heidelberg Editions International, the corporate name used by the artists of The School of Reductionism.

http://gvgg.com/artists/trice/

Artist

R.C. Trice R.C. Trice

Heather Valencia

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

From: WAKING DREAMS

Heather Valencia

July 16 - August 31, 1996

In the ancient myths of her people, the goddess dreamed the world and it was.  For many years a leader of the Yaqui dreaming circles, Heather Valencia reaches into the depths where myth is a reality and the life we lead is the dream from which we waken.

Artist

Heather Valencia Heather Valencia

Francine Vernac

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

FRANCINE VERNAC is a multidisciplinary artist from Quebec City. Her work as a painter is rooted in her desire to espouse a unique path to contemplate the world while escaping its veils. A strong yet sensitive quest of the absolute exploring intertwined textures, a spontaneous act of rhythm from which the artist shatters space and lets light narrates its own tale.

In addition, Francine studied the ancient art of calligraphy and several techniques used in art prints.

For the past twenty years, Vernac’s work has been shown throughout Canada, France, Belgium, Germany, Great Britain, Mexico and Tunisia as well as in the United States. She has been invited to various art exhibits throughout the world.

She has illustrated numerous books and her paintings are held by private and public collectors. She is a member of RAAV (visual art artists from Quebec), of Les Ateliers Ouverts (access to artists workshops yearly event) and a member of l’Union des artistes (an actor’s guild). She sits as a jury for established artists contests and prizes.

http://francinevernac.blogspot.com/

Artist

Francine Vernac Francine Vernac

Irena Vormittag

Tue Oct 18 00:00:00 2011

Irena Vormittag

I grew up in suburban Niagara Falls in the early ‘50's.  My adolescence was nurtured by immigrants who had left a war ravaged Europe.  These people had a dream.  They wanted big front lawns, big cars, good schools and a bedroom for every child, lots of food on the table and steady work that paid well.  I lived in that suburban dream, but I always marked myself as being the odd person out.  Who could blame me?  I spent the first six years of my life in Nazi-occupied Krakow.

Can you imagine how those experiences could colour the mind of a six year old?

If anyone needed to embark on a search for identity, it was me.  I moved from a place where they rolled up Niagara sidewalks at sunset to New York where the sidewalks were like 24-hour Broadway shows.  New York was so big and alive it swallowed all my speed and aggression.  Back in Canada, the only people I could relate to were Cree Indians.  They started me on an inner quest that took me to the Hopi Indians in the American Southwest and eventually into Tantric: Indian mysticism.

In 1995, I was ready to return to Krakow, Poland.  I wanted to see my roots steeped in these new perspectives.  I discovered a city whose people inhabited the most intact medieval city in Western Europe.  The history there is not confined to schools and libraries.  It’s painted in building tiles, jammed into corners and cornices and waves at you in flags.  It’s even under the sidewalks.  With no space in the cemeteries, during the worst of occupations, the citizens had to bury their dead under the cobblestones.  Every cobblestone holds the history of a moment.  The irony is that in this city that is a corridor for martial dreams, the people are so alive.  I see 80, 90-year old people going to the market.  Energy fills them.  They are old but life still dances in their eyes.

It’s crazy but in Canada there’s almost too much safety here.  Too much security.  There is nothing to prick us awake.

My paintings are alive.  For thirteen years now I have been getting closer and closer to painting on canvas the spirit that moves us.  In my paintings, I want people to see and feel and sense this spirit that I found so readily in Krakow.  May it create an opening for their own searching.

http://dragonwhistle.ca/galleries/IrenaV2/index.html

Irena Vormittag Irena Vormittag

Michael Hayes

Tue Oct 18 00:00:00 2011

No Biography is available at this time for Michael Hayes.

Artist

Michael Hayes Michael Hayes

Pamela Williams

Sun Oct 18 00:00:00 2009

No biography is available at this time for Pamela Williams.

http://pages.interlog.com/~romantic/home.html

Artist

Pamela Williams Pamela Williams

Wendy Rombough

Wed Oct 21 00:00:00 2009

From the 2004 Contact exhibit:

 

As a young child, Wendy first experienced the development of an image in her father’s hobby darkroom.  The magic of the photographic medium has continued to fascinate and inspire her since.  She has studied photography at Ryerson Polytechnical University and George Brown College.  She is a member of Gallery 44 and Visual Arts Ontario. Her work has appeared in numerous publications on book and c.d. covers, art cards and ad campaigns.

 

wendyrombough.com/

Wendy Rombough Wendy Rombough

murmurs

Sat Dec 3 00:00:00 2011

Saturday, December 10, 2011 2:30 - 5:30pm

a   m u r m u r   o f   u n c e r t a i n t y 

 

How does real change begin?

 

You may have seen starlings, gathered together in one place.

They are full of agitation, each bird expressing itself individually.

Then, suddenly, they rise up and fly as one, an agreed departure,

a movement like the breath, expanding out and in,

a murmuration of starlings.

 

Now we are a murmur of uncertainty. We know we have lost our way.

 

What does it mean to be human?

Perhaps we are looking for the question

that will release us from the prisons we have created,

to fly as one, an agreed departure, a new direction.

 

 

murmurs of uncertainty

a deep persistent hum

the flutter of a thousand wings

summoning a question

Exhibition, Group Show

murmurs 160 murmurs

Floyd Kuptana

Sat Nov 5 00:00:00 2011

Floyd Kuptana has worked in stone for decades, with his sculptures available in several galleries in Toronto and beyond. A prolific sculptor, he has sold many pieces within hours of finishing them.

The gallery currently has two pieces in its permanent collection, 'Sedna' and 'Self-Portrait', and many others can be seen throughout the exhibit spaces -- on loan to the gallery.

In recent years, Floyd has also worked in paint and collage.

Please see videos created at the gallery:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3d4hWP6CtA&list=PLTFTptBIT3CKnObtap-QrLRqRPIGZejB3

Videos of individual sculptures here and here

More details on the artist are found here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Kuptana

Artist

Floyd Kuptana Floyd Kuptana

steadfast

Thu Nov 6 00:00:00 2014

Saturday, November 29

Visiting artist Ramona Zoladek came into the gallery just as ‘the limits of control’ was ending. She asked if her sculptural work, combining plaster and concrete forms with living plants/seeds, might be compatible to exhibit. Considering examples of her work we invited her to create seven vertical forms, three to be placed outside in front of the gallery and four to be used in the interior. Ramona was able to complete and install these forms during her two week stay in Toronto before returning to England where she will resume her work. The columns placed, each in one of the four directions, are the cornerstones of the present exhibit entitled  s t e a d f a s t.

 

The ancients thought that when the world was made the first created were the Four Cardinal Points. Direction established space and within space time was born. North, South, East and West were imagined as giant angelic forms, deeply silent and steadfast, whose presence gave rise to the human realm.

 

In the adjoining east gallery Harris has placed work to represent the angelic nature of these directional forms, considering how the quality of steadfast is found in life;  a tree deeply rooted in its treeness, an animal who always expresses its true nature and the person who holds a place, reliably performing a task.

 

We cannot imagine a world without orientation and the succession of time. But can we dimly perceive the timeless beings who preserve us from the unlimited and give us place?

 

More work by Ramona Zoladek:  http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/

 

More work by Sarah Hillock:  http://www.sarahhillock.com/

 “steadfast” – sculpture by Ramona Zoladek, mixed media work by Sarah Hillock and deborah harris

 

-Sculptures of plaster, soil and seeds explore what is familiar and yet not easily recognized

 

TORONTO – Visiting Toronto just after winning a prestigious UK award for her sculpture, emerging artist Ramona Zoladek has created new work for downtown public art museum Gallery Arcturus. Her eight-foot-high columns of sculptured plaster, earth and seeds have become cornerstones in the gallery’s newest exhibit “s t e a d f a s t”. A reception for the art installation is Saturday, November 29.

 

 Three of Zoladek’s seven pillars, all created in studio and finished on site, lean against the façade of the 170-year brick building on Gerrard Street East. Inside the main exhibit hall are four more sculptures, placed in each of the cardinal directions. Here gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris notes that the earliest peoples imagined north, south, east and west to be giant angelic forms, deeply silent and steadfast – and whose presence give us our orientation in this world.

 

 “Time, process and material are particularly important aspects of my work,” says Zoladek. Her practice explores the relationships between nature, objects and architecture -- revolving around ideas of growth and ruin as they interact with nature.

 

 harris, who is responsible for curating the five exhibit spaces throughout the four-story public gallery, says she has placed the columns to represent “the nature of what is steadfast -- of what stands constant through time.”

 

 Immediately before her brief sojourn in Toronto during October 2014, Zoladek won Britain’s “largest student accolade,” a 40,000 pound sterling prize sponsored by UK philanthropist Mr Wee Teng Woon. To fulfil her acceptance of the award, she is now in studio at Newcastle, England for the next year.

 

 Arcturus’ artist-in-residence continues the installation with works by herself and Ontario artist Sarah Hillock. Their mixed-media pieces explore, says harris, “how the quality of steadfast is found in life; a tree deeply rooted in its treeness, an animal who always expresses its true nature and the person who holds a place, reliably performing a task.”

 

 The directional columns appear ancient as if they may crumble “on their way to becoming part of a landscape” says Zoladek – and are in contrast to the pristine expansiveness of the space. The first floor exhibit rooms have been named the “genesis gallery” and are where new work is developed as well as displayed. Four new galleries opened for viewing this year; dedicated spaces for exhibiting sculpture, photography, painting and collage.

 

 Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University in the newly-named “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m. The reception on Saturday, November 29 is from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

 

--  --

A video introduction to the show: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T98NUTDqJsY

 

 

More on Ramona Zoladek:   http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/     http://ramonazoladek.com/

 

More on Sarah Hillock:  http://www.sarahhillock.com/

 

More on deborah harris:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=16

 

Work from the Gallery Arcturus permanent collection by Camie Geary-Martin also appears in the current show. More on Camie Geary-Martin:   http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=172

 

 

Selected imagesand the invitation for “steadfast” can be seen at arcturus.caunder ‘Events’ or:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-11-06-steadfast

 

 

Contact the gallery for publishable images.

 

 

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus

 

 

--

 

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 29, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

 

Exhibit runs November 6, 2014 to January 10, 2015

 

 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

 

Media contact:  Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

 

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto, Ontario   M5B 1G6

416-977-1077   http://arcturus.ca/

 

--

 

the five galleries of arcturus

 

genesis gallery:

exhibits work which is responsive to a particular inquiry or theme often beginning from an installation of form and sculpture expanding to include work created in the space itself

 

up north gallery:

exhibits works which represent the northern landscape, and a large collection of Inuit sculpture by artist Floyd Kuptana

 

e.j. gold gallery:

exhibits works from the permanent collection including works by E.J. Gold and the members of the School of Reductionism

 

collage gallery:

exhibits unique collage works by artist deborah harris and participants of the gallery’s collage workshops

 

ascending gallery:

exhibits works from the permanent collection including photography by Simeon Posen

Exhibition

 “steadfast” – sculpture by Ramona Zoladek, mixed media work by Sarah Hillock and deborah harris

 

-Sculptures of plaster, soil and seeds explore what is familiar and yet not easily recognized

 

TORONTO – Visiting Toronto just after winning a prestigious UK award for her sculpture, emerging artist Ramona Zoladek has created new work for downtown public art museum Gallery Arcturus. Her eight-foot-high columns of sculptured plaster, earth and seeds have become cornerstones in the gallery’s newest exhibit “s t e a d f a s t”. A reception for the art installation is Saturday, November 29.

 

 Three of Zoladek’s seven pillars, all created in studio and finished on site, lean against the façade of the 170-year brick building on Gerrard Street East. Inside the main exhibit hall are four more sculptures, placed in each of the cardinal directions. Here gallery artist-in-residence deborah harris notes that the earliest peoples imagined north, south, east and west to be giant angelic forms, deeply silent and steadfast – and whose presence give us our orientation in this world.

 

 “Time, process and material are particularly important aspects of my work,” says Zoladek. Her practice explores the relationships between nature, objects and architecture -- revolving around ideas of growth and ruin as they interact with nature.

 

 harris, who is responsible for curating the five exhibit spaces throughout the four-story public gallery, says she has placed the columns to represent “the nature of what is steadfast -- of what stands constant through time.”

 

 Immediately before her brief sojourn in Toronto during October 2014, Zoladek won Britain’s “largest student accolade,” a 40,000 pound sterling prize sponsored by UK philanthropist Mr Wee Teng Woon. To fulfil her acceptance of the award, she is now in studio at Newcastle, England for the next year.

 

 Arcturus’ artist-in-residence continues the installation with works by herself and Ontario artist Sarah Hillock. Their mixed-media pieces explore, says harris, “how the quality of steadfast is found in life; a tree deeply rooted in its treeness, an animal who always expresses its true nature and the person who holds a place, reliably performing a task.”

 

 The directional columns appear ancient as if they may crumble “on their way to becoming part of a landscape” says Zoladek – and are in contrast to the pristine expansiveness of the space. The first floor exhibit rooms have been named the “genesis gallery” and are where new work is developed as well as displayed. Four new galleries opened for viewing this year; dedicated spaces for exhibiting sculpture, photography, painting and collage.

 

 Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum with free admission, housed in historic buildings next to Ryerson University in the newly-named “Garden District” neighbourhood surrounding Allan Gardens. Hours are Tuesday to Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m. The reception on Saturday, November 29 is from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

 

--  --

A video introduction to the show: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T98NUTDqJsY

 

 

More on Ramona Zoladek:   http://ramonazoladek.tumblr.com/     http://ramonazoladek.com/

 

More on Sarah Hillock:  http://www.sarahhillock.com/

 

More on deborah harris:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=16

 

Work from the Gallery Arcturus permanent collection by Camie Geary-Martin also appears in the current show. More on Camie Geary-Martin:   http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=172

 

 

Selected imagesand the invitation for “steadfast” can be seen at arcturus.caunder ‘Events’ or:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-11-06-steadfast

 

 

Contact the gallery for publishable images.

 

 

Gallery Arcturus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GalleryArcturus

 

 

--

 

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 29, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

 

Exhibit runs November 6, 2014 to January 10, 2015

 

 

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

 

Media contact:  Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

 

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto, Ontario   M5B 1G6

416-977-1077   http://arcturus.ca/

 

--

 

the five galleries of arcturus

 

genesis gallery:

exhibits work which is responsive to a particular inquiry or theme often beginning from an installation of form and sculpture expanding to include work created in the space itself

 

up north gallery:

exhibits works which represent the northern landscape, and a large collection of Inuit sculpture by artist Floyd Kuptana

 

e.j. gold gallery:

exhibits works from the permanent collection including works by E.J. Gold and the members of the School of Reductionism

 

collage gallery:

exhibits unique collage works by artist deborah harris and participants of the gallery’s collage workshops

 

ascending gallery:

exhibits works from the permanent collection including photography by Simeon Posen

steadfast 160 steadfast Ramona Zoladek Sarah Hillock deborah harris

'"The limits of control" in the EJ Gold Gallery

Mon Nov 10 00:00:00 2014

This work began as a single painting, an interpretation of the mass migration of children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador through Mexico to the American border.

Once the painting was finished it seemed to represent something less specific and I saw it more as a part of our human condition. I looked at images of other walls, in other places, built now and in other times and I began to feel the sensation of facing resistance not simply in walls erected by the collective but those I construct around myself. The more I explored this the more hopeless I became. This was not a show that I wanted to create or put in front of viewers but I was also not able to walk away from it. I wanted to discover a response  not  found in tanks and missiles, encampments and legislation. From somewhere the image came to me of catapulting, vaulting over the wall. With that came a sense that it is and must be our individual challenge to leap over those walls. That freedom is not something which can be given but must be found.

This is not a request to ignore oppression, either those who oppress or those who are oppressed.  

Limits relate to the boundaries of our perception. They are defined by us, passed on and accepted or rejected by us. Anything beyond those limits is unknown. Because we fear the unknown we attempt to control those boundaries and hide behind them.

This work represents the fortress and the daring possibility of leaping.

 

artist in residence  deborah harris

-- --

see YouTube videos inspired by this show here and here

' ' deborah harris

Luke Gilliam

Thu Dec 22 00:00:00 2011

From Luke Gilliam:

My earliest pieces involved drawing abstract shapes onto cardboard and then cutting the cardboard into strips and then collaging the strips on yet more pieces of cardboard with different colour formats.  

As time progressed I began adding in abstract symbols using gouache and acrylic. Many of these early drawings later served as subjects to be painted direct onto canvas with variations and then the use of gluing small found objects usually made of metal onto these paintings. During my first four years of painting I gradually progressed to full sculpture paintings which would involve attaching nails and metal objects onto wooden panels and drilling into the panel to make room for string to be wound through and around the panel -- then the nails to form obscure stringed instruments. I found it very useful to start off with an odd shaped piece of wood as it could be glued into the finished piece at the end and then the whole piece would be painted with emulsion from the hardware store. These pieces were made exclusively with contact cement as it proved very robust. I would like to eventually return to this type of sculpture painting.

All of my work since 2012 involves extensive one- to four-day drawings onto coloured cardboard to achieve a full profile of a figure or figures. Then I use a variety of techniques including brushes and disused match boxes to apply the paint. The figure or figures come alive in a hybrid painting that usually blends impressionistic and expressionist -- and occasionally surrealist -- ways of rendering the figure into one cohesive 'fusion' oriented painting. I feel painting with only one technique becomes very tiresome so I am now devoted the practice that I call hybrid painting, which other people have done and discussed but which has never taken off as a mainstream art movement.

Luke Gilliam's work on Tumblr

---------------------------

From 2014:

Luke Gilliam lives and works in Bath, United Kingdom.

Solo Exhibitions

SIMPLETON, ST JAMES WINE VAULTS, Bath 2008

Group Exhibitions

SENTINELS EXHIBITION, GALLERY ARCTURUS, Toronto Sep 2009

GROUP EXHIBITION, SMITH'S CAFE, Bath June 2009

COMMISSION, CAFE PARISIEN, Bath April 2009

GUEST CURATOR, BRITISH ART ACADEMY, Bath April 2009

GUEST CURATOR, BRITISH ART ACADEMY, Bath March 2009

GROUP EXHIBITION, BRITISH ART ACADEMY, Bath Feb 2009

GROUP EXHIBITION, BRITISH ART ACADEMY, Bath Jan 2009

MIXED MEDIA EXHIBITION, ST JAMES, Bath Nov 2008

BATH OPEN ART FAIR, Bath 2008

NUIT BLANCHE, Toronto 2007

ZENPHYREMOS, AUTRE COTE DU PONT, Lyon 2006

ANIMOTS, Lyon 2006

NEW DAY VOLUME I, Lyon 2006

MR J FOR ALEX BELLEGARDE, Distillery , Toronto 2003

QUINSIN NACHOFF LIVE VOL II, Distillery, Toronto 2003

QUINSIN NACHOFF LIVE VOL I Distillery, Toronto 2003

MUSIC THAT LIVE FOR PEOPLE, Toronto 1998

SONG FOR CAITLIN, Toronto 1998

DOGMA, Directed by Kevin Smith, Toronto 1998

EARLY HUNGER, Maze Gallery , Toronto 1994

Projects

Ottawa Off Jazz Festival, Ottawa, 2005

Collections

Lotus Commission, Bath UK

Cosmic Connection With The World, British Art Academy, Bath UK

Bibliography

"Discover the British Soul", Luke Gilliam Studios, 38p Softcover, (September 2009)

 

http://www.lukegilliamproject.co.nf/

Artist

Luke Gilliam Luke Gilliam

Jeremy Gordaneer

Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 2012

Jeremy was born in Ontario and grew up in Victoria, BC. As the son of Canadian painter James Gordaneer, RCA, he was surrounded by art and began taking an interest in painting at an early age. He attended the Camosun College Fine Arts program in the early ‘90s and has traveled extensively throughout Europe,Africa and America in order to study art and hone his craft. He spent a decade as a member of the Chapman Group in Victoria, a loose collective of artists and writers, who met weekly to study art, philosophy, physics and theology, as well as to provide a rigorous critique of each other’s work. He studied Theatre at the University of Victoria and continues to support himself through scenic art and design for theatre and dance. Jeremy continues to paint, sculpt and draw on a regular basis.

For many years the central focus in Gordaneer’s art has been exploring different ways to ground into being the idea of a continuum. He takes the traditional dichotomies of painting and sculpture, figure/ground, background/foreground, and subverts them in order to create an interesting new pictorial space more in keeping with the contemporary world. Beginning with painting, then often moving towards a more three dimensional sculptoral approach, Gordaneer now often combines the two mediums. The inclusion of found objects in the sculptures gives the viewer an entry point to the work as well as calling into question scale and meaning.

https://jeremygordaneer.wordpress.com/

Artist

Jeremy Gordaneer Jeremy Gordaneer

Jorge Luna

Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 2012

Jorge Luna Jorge Luna

al sur de la frontera - south of the border down Mexico way

Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 2012

Exhibition

al sur de la frontera - south of the border down Mexico way al sur de la frontera - south of the border down Mexico way

three sisters

Tue Feb 28 00:00:00 2012

Saturday, April 14, 2012 2:30 - 5:30pm

 

Three sisters of fate hold the treads

 

 

One weaves.  One  measures.  One  cuts.

 

 

Each life wound tight

 

 

passes through their hands.

 

 

Unless, by grace and effort,

 

 

Will awakens in that life,

 

 

unties the thread and flies.

Exhibition

three  sisters 320 three  sisters Erika Takacs Kelly Rivera

dis integrating

Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 2012

Saturday, April 14, 2012 2:30 - 5:30pm

dis  integrating

 moving towards and away from coherence 

 

Employing works from the permanent collection, or on loan, by artists Peter Chung, Paul Saari, Dan Walsh, Andrea Maguire, Floyd Kuptana, William Caldwell, Camie Geary-Martin, Ed Drass. 

 

Wondering where I am



I look for orientation,

inside the rock balanced on a pedestal,

or on a pedestal balanced on a rock,

in one house or the other, bathed in light,

this or that room in the temple’s tower,

an improvised gesture squeezed between two boxes,

a window in a window opening.

I could be inside a cube submerged beneath the waves

or Sedna out of water,

turning to a lighthouse,

or lamenting in frozen sorrow.

Wondering where I am

I return to harbour.

Somewhere between north-west and south-east

is a path.

Exhibition, Group Show

dis  integrating 160 dis  integrating

Art Safari

Sat Apr 28 00:00:00 2012

What is public art?

Public art enters into those places that we travel through, outside of our more intimate spaces and yet they are part of our lives, a part that we have little control over. For the artist who chooses to place their work in the public domain there is much more to consider than their own self expression.  The artist must consider the expanded field of attention which this work will occupy, its relationship to the surrounding forms and structures, how it communicates at a distance and to those coming in close contact with it. It is interesting to note that a tree or a plantis never disorienting, offensive or opinionated.  To create public art which actually enhances the already crowded visual environment is a difficult challenge but one which we believe is a worthy pursuit.

With this as our aim we created the form of  CITY ART, an outreaching branch of THE FOUNDATION FOR THE STUDY OF OBJECTIVE ART, a charitable arts organization dedicated to exploring the nature and possibility of objective art.

Art Safari 160 Art Safari

inclined planes

Sat May 12 00:00:00 2012

Saturday May 12, 2 - 5pm

A Photographic Installation by Simeon Posen

 

 the surface of water

 the branches of trees

 inclined to meet

 

Inclined plane: the leaning of two planes towards each other so as to make an angle at the point where they meet; a plane inclined to the horizon. Horizon: the circle which bounds the earth’s surface visible to a spectator from a given point, the apparent junction of the earth and sky, an imaginary great circle parallel to this whose plane passes through the centre of the earth

inclined planes     A Photographic Installation by Simeon Posen

GALLERY ARCTURUS
Exhibit runs May 12 to June 23, 2012.
Opening Reception:  Saturday May 12, 2 to 5pm


 the surface of water
 the branches of trees
 inclined to meet

Inclined plane: the leaning of two planes towards each other so as to make an angle at the point where they meet; a plane inclined to the horizon. Horizon: the circle which bounds the earth’s surface visible to a spectator from a given point, the apparent junction of the earth and sky, an imaginary great circle parallel to this whose plane passes through the centre of the earth


New photo exhibit invites gallery visitors to discover the essence of rivers, trees

Toronto – May 11:     Can viewing photographs of nature at a gallery in the centre of Toronto inspire a sense of being outside? The installation of images by Toronto-based photographer Simeon Posen at Gallery Arcturus evokes the movement of water and the intricacy of a forest. His black and white photographs of rivers and trees are displayed with a clear intent to remind viewers what it is to be in a natural space.

 Both the photographer and Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris have worked in stage design, evidenced by a flowing installation of silver-based prints depicting water rushing. The images are not on the walls -- Harris has chosen to place them on low pedestals across the floor so that the viewer can experience the vantage point of standing on a riverbank. In the next room, transparencies of branches and trunks are displayed in glass prisms placed upon tall pedestals.

 Simeon Posen’s exploration into natural imagery continues decades after having trained with Ansel Adams. Posen works in film and develops the negatives himself. “Film is attempting to translate the extraordinary vision that the eye has,” says Posen.

 His images attract the close attention of the viewer, but are not centred on one feature or detail. “You’re photographing some collection of elements,” he says, “all the peripheral things are just as important; the edges are just as important.”

 After many years of depicting architectural and natural spaces Posen still considers his work as exploring and learning. “You have to do something a long time to appreciate how difficult it is,” says Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris.

 “What is extraordinary about his work,” says Harris, “is that he sees. His pieces reflect a tremendous amount of time and attention and an ongoing excitement to learn more.”

-- --

Simeon Posen has exhibited his work previously at Gallery Arcturus, some of which is in the gallery’s permanent collection:

http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=31

See previous work by Sim Posen: http://www.simeonposen.com/

-- --

BACKGROUND:

Gallery Arcturus regularly exhibits shows in connection with the annual Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival – however this exhibit is not formally part of the 2012 event.

Bio for Sim Posen:
Born and raised in Toronto, Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with works spanning over four decades. His studies in architecture and stage design contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs – namely, illuminating the intricacies of the parts to express the structure of the whole, whether created by nature or by man.

Posen’s technique, style and composition are also influenced by such photographers as Marie Cosindas, Wynn Bullock and Brett Weston and Ansel Adams with whom he studied in California.

Receiving both federal and provincial grants, Posen has conducted extensive photographic studies of the architecture of France, Austria, Iran and Greece; as well as broadly documenting the Ontario landscape.

Today, Posen continues his exploration of photographic art through blending new and old technology, frequently exhibiting while continuing his professional career in architecture.

Technique:
Posen utilizes 8x10 and mid-size negative formats to express the beauty of natural form. He prefers the subtlety of ‘black and white’, maximizing the use of digital technology interwoven with more traditional methods. He uses ‘Pyro’ for negative development, a formula favoured by Adams and Weston, and continues to print on silver fibre-based papers.

Simeon Posen brings an added dimension of brilliance to his works by carefully selecting the conditions of light and weather for the subject chosen. His exposures can require up to 30 minutes. This study and patience bring an intensity yet subtlety to his nature studies.

Equipment:
A 4” x 5” Japanese Wista sealed camera, T-MAX [Kodak] film, a number of German and Japanese lenses – and “everything of course is on a tripod”, says Posen.

Exhibition

inclined planes     A Photographic Installation by Simeon Posen

GALLERY ARCTURUS
Exhibit runs May 12 to June 23, 2012.
Opening Reception:  Saturday May 12, 2 to 5pm


 the surface of water
 the branches of trees
 inclined to meet

Inclined plane: the leaning of two planes towards each other so as to make an angle at the point where they meet; a plane inclined to the horizon. Horizon: the circle which bounds the earth’s surface visible to a spectator from a given point, the apparent junction of the earth and sky, an imaginary great circle parallel to this whose plane passes through the centre of the earth


New photo exhibit invites gallery visitors to discover the essence of rivers, trees

Toronto – May 11:     Can viewing photographs of nature at a gallery in the centre of Toronto inspire a sense of being outside? The installation of images by Toronto-based photographer Simeon Posen at Gallery Arcturus evokes the movement of water and the intricacy of a forest. His black and white photographs of rivers and trees are displayed with a clear intent to remind viewers what it is to be in a natural space.

 Both the photographer and Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris have worked in stage design, evidenced by a flowing installation of silver-based prints depicting water rushing. The images are not on the walls -- Harris has chosen to place them on low pedestals across the floor so that the viewer can experience the vantage point of standing on a riverbank. In the next room, transparencies of branches and trunks are displayed in glass prisms placed upon tall pedestals.

 Simeon Posen’s exploration into natural imagery continues decades after having trained with Ansel Adams. Posen works in film and develops the negatives himself. “Film is attempting to translate the extraordinary vision that the eye has,” says Posen.

 His images attract the close attention of the viewer, but are not centred on one feature or detail. “You’re photographing some collection of elements,” he says, “all the peripheral things are just as important; the edges are just as important.”

 After many years of depicting architectural and natural spaces Posen still considers his work as exploring and learning. “You have to do something a long time to appreciate how difficult it is,” says Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence Deborah Harris.

 “What is extraordinary about his work,” says Harris, “is that he sees. His pieces reflect a tremendous amount of time and attention and an ongoing excitement to learn more.”

-- --

Simeon Posen has exhibited his work previously at Gallery Arcturus, some of which is in the gallery’s permanent collection:

http://www.arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=31

See previous work by Sim Posen: http://www.simeonposen.com/

-- --

BACKGROUND:

Gallery Arcturus regularly exhibits shows in connection with the annual Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival – however this exhibit is not formally part of the 2012 event.

Bio for Sim Posen:
Born and raised in Toronto, Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with works spanning over four decades. His studies in architecture and stage design contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs – namely, illuminating the intricacies of the parts to express the structure of the whole, whether created by nature or by man.

Posen’s technique, style and composition are also influenced by such photographers as Marie Cosindas, Wynn Bullock and Brett Weston and Ansel Adams with whom he studied in California.

Receiving both federal and provincial grants, Posen has conducted extensive photographic studies of the architecture of France, Austria, Iran and Greece; as well as broadly documenting the Ontario landscape.

Today, Posen continues his exploration of photographic art through blending new and old technology, frequently exhibiting while continuing his professional career in architecture.

Technique:
Posen utilizes 8x10 and mid-size negative formats to express the beauty of natural form. He prefers the subtlety of ‘black and white’, maximizing the use of digital technology interwoven with more traditional methods. He uses ‘Pyro’ for negative development, a formula favoured by Adams and Weston, and continues to print on silver fibre-based papers.

Simeon Posen brings an added dimension of brilliance to his works by carefully selecting the conditions of light and weather for the subject chosen. His exposures can require up to 30 minutes. This study and patience bring an intensity yet subtlety to his nature studies.

Equipment:
A 4” x 5” Japanese Wista sealed camera, T-MAX [Kodak] film, a number of German and Japanese lenses – and “everything of course is on a tripod”, says Posen.

inclined planes 320 inclined planes Simeon Posen

as different as NIGHT and DAY: a response

Sun Mar 13 00:00:00 2011

'as different as night and day'

 

To the people of Japan, in the wake of the earth quake and tsunami, these words have a terrifying potency … that in the space between night and day, the world as we know it can change.


We have reshaped our gallery space in response to this cataclysmic event, using sculpture and works from the permanent collection as well as collage that incorporates recent news images. Our intention is to invite visitors to move beyond the media imagery into a quiet space where contemplation is possible and a shared feeling may arise, connecting us to the suffering of the Japanese people.

Exhibition, Group Show

as different as NIGHT and DAY: a response as different as NIGHT and DAY: a response

black and white

Sat May 12 00:00:00 2012

- work in this show is on loan or part of the permanent collection -

Exhibition

black and white black and white

e c h o e s

Wed Jul 25 00:00:00 2012

Flowing directly from the exhibit s u f f i c i e n t, this show allows three painters to work with a series of objects in the gallery and each translate what is seen.

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

e c h o e s 160 e c h o e s Vivian Felsen deborah harris Sae Kimura

s u f f i c i e n t

Tue Jul 3 00:00:00 2012

 

s u f f i c i e n t

 

Most shows at Gallery Arcturus happen spontaneously, inspired in part by what has preceded.

 

The exhibit "s u f f i c i e n t" reconfigures components from the previous show in surprising ways.

 

Sculpture, stones, pedestals and a painting entitled 'Renaissance' transform the space into an expression of order, precision and quietness which is, simply, 'sufficient'.

 

Walking through the door you may find that impressions of the city have been left outside.

 

The gallery will be evolving throughout the summer with artists creating work responsive to the current environment.

 

As always, visitors are welcome to come in for any length of time, view the work in progress or to sit, write or contemplate.

 

Please see a video of this exhibit as it evolved here

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

s u f f i c i e n t s u f f i c i e n t Vivian Felsen Sae Kinura deborah harris

Terri Quinn

Sun Oct 14 00:00:00 2012

No biography is available at this time for Terri Quinn.

Artist

Terri Quinn Terri Quinn

t h r o u g h and t h r o u g h Part Two

Tue Feb 5 00:00:00 2013

March 9, 2013, 2:30-5:30pm

 

An artists' inquiry, open for viewing.

 

 

See a video of the exhibit here.

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

t h r o u g h and t h r o u g h Part Two 160 t h r o u g h and t h r o u g h Part Two deborah harris Vivian Felsen Sae Kimura

t h r o u g h and t h r o u g h

Sat Dec 1 11:00:00 2012

Reception December 8, 2:30 5:30 pm

An exploration and discovery

through in and through out

of how gesture shapes form

and form invites gesture

 

Vivian Felsen

 

Sae Kimura

 

deborah harris

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

t h r o u g h    and    t h r o u g h 160 t h r o u g h    and    t h r o u g h Vivian Felsen Sae Kimura deborah harris

P L A C E D

Tue Jul 2 00:00:00 2013

Saturday, September 21; 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Who is,
where and when,
in relationship to what,
placement determines
possibility.

 

A mixed media installation responded to by deborah harris, Vivian Felsen and Sae Kimura.

See a video of the workshop in progress HERE.

 

Images taken during the installation of P L A C E D can be seen here:

http://arcturus.ca/galleries/gallery.php?id=264

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

P L A C E D 160 P L A C E D deborah harris Vivian Felsen

Looking for you...

Sat Oct 26 14:30:00 2013

Saturday, October 26. 2:30 - 5:30pm

Looking for you….

 

 

Stories

 

written on the faces that lived them.

 

Moments that inscribe in an instant

 

in language too human to hide,

 

recognizable, knowable.

 

as it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be’

 

 

looking is reading.

 

-- --

 

Looking for your face

 

From the beginning of my life

I have been looking for your face

but today I have seen it

 

Today I have seen the charm, the beauty, and

the unfathomable grace of the face that I have been looking for

 

Today I have found you

and those who laughed and scorned me yesterday

are sorry they were not looking as I did

 

I am bewildered by the magnificence of your beauty

and wish to see you with a hundred eyes

 

My heart has burned with passion and has searched forever

for this wondrous beauty I now behold

I am ashamed to call this love human

and afraid of God to call it divine

 

Your fragrant breath like the morning breeze

has come to the stillness of the garden

You have breathed new life into me

I have become your sunshine

and also your shadow

 

My soul is screaming in ecstasy

Every fibre of my being

is in love with you

Your effulgence has lit a fire in my heart

and you have made radiant

for me the earth and sky

 

My arrow of love has arrived at the target

I am in the house of mercy

and my heart is a place of prayer

 

RUMI

Exhibition, Group Show

Looking for you... 320 Looking for you... E.J. Gold William Caldwell Scott Griffin, Norman Allan

sojourners

Tue Dec 10 00:00:00 2013

December 14, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

We all enter as children    and then we forget
a lifetime spent trying to remember where we came from
remains a mystery

Exhibition

sojourners sojourners deborah harris Sae Kimura

t u r n i n g

Sat Jan 4 00:00:00 2014

http://arcturus.ca/slideshowpro/albums/album-238/lg/turning_text_white_on_black.png

Exhibition

t u r n i n g 160 t u r n i n g deborah harris

sojourners ... upper gallery

Sat Jan 4 00:00:00 2014

We all enter as children    and then we forget
a lifetime spent trying to remember where we came from
remains a mystery

Exhibition

sojourners ... upper gallery sojourners ... upper gallery Sae Kimura deborah harris

Sae Kimura

Thu Feb 20 00:00:00 2014

Writing about the artist workshop and exhibit t h r o u g h and t h r o u g h Part Two :

There is a miracle of encountering other artists, of how they are similar and different. Magic of colors and lines.
Looking at this show I can see deborah, Vivian and me and how we talk without words.
I think that can be seen by everyone who visits, not just we three. In the work of this exhibit you can see our communication.

For me Gallery Arcturus is the place
for study without getting bored,
for play very very seriously,
for adventure to unknown world
and for discovering myself deeply.

 

Her web site:  http://esalalamu.jimdo.com/

Artist

Sae Kimura Sae Kimura

visual poetry: works from The Artist Project

Sat Mar 1 00:00:00 2014

On the second floor of the gallery, viewers are invited to see recent work that was featured at Toronto art exhibition The Artist Project.

Exhibition

visual poetry: works from The Artist Project visual poetry: works from The Artist Project deborah harris

Crossing the great waters

Sat May 3 00:00:00 2014

Saturday May 3, 2:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Artists Joan Cullen and Dominique Cruchet are looking at the vestiges of human activities along shore lines, riverbanks, beaches and waterways. The scenes explored in different countries, over several years, reflect elements of human construction and traces of passage -- all of which are destined to disappear.

The phrase 'crossing the great water' frequently appears in the text of The I-Ching. It signifies striking out into the unknown and unfamiliar, taking on possibly dangerous or difficult tasks. In this exhibition Cruchet and Cullen have used it as a metaphor to describe their collaboration; water the vehicle around which the images coalesce.

Official CONTACT page: http://2014.scotiabankcontactphoto.com/events/1545

The book "Crossing the Great Waters" can be seen HERE.

Find a Facebook page for the exhibit HERE and the reception HERE.

Photography and painting: the work of Dominique Cruchet and Joan Cullen

The exhibit “Crossing the great waters” fills the main exhibit space at Gallery Arcturus

TORONTO — Viewers are invited to see works in photography by Dominique Cruchet and painting by Joan Cullen, artists who share their time between France and Prince Edward Island. Their joint exposition “Crossing the great waters” opens Saturday, May 3 at Gallery Arcturus. Cruchet’s black and white prints and Cullen’s deeply coloured work in paint and ink fill the main gallery of this public art museum in downtown Toronto.

The phrase "crossing the great waters" frequently appears in the classic Chinese text I Ching. It signifies striking out into the unknown and unfamiliar, taking on possibly dangerous or difficult tasks. In the exhibition, Cruchet and Cullen have used this as a metaphor for exploring both the worlds these images point to and a dialogue between photography and painting, water the vehicle around which the works coalesce.

Dominique Cruchet’sphotography looks at vestiges of human activities along shore lines, river banks, beaches, waterways – in a way treating the constructions and traces of human passage as an archaeologist examines artefacts.

Joan Cullen's paintings explore life near or on water. Using vibrant colour and gesture, her works express the elemental: wind-swept grass, sky, water. She invites us to traverse these spaces in the company of a solitary animal or flock of birds. Or, as in the 29-foot wide title piece “Crossing the Great Waters, Traverser les grandes eaux”, large ships become small in a vast sea of blue.

The exhibit opens in the main space of Gallery Arcturus at 80 Gerrard Street East on Saturday, May 3 with a reception from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Details can be found at arcturus.ca or on Facebook.

JOAN CULLEN:  “My work has developed along certain themes which I return to again and again – integrity of place, natural elements as allegory, beauty as solace.” In ‘Sissable’ for example, the subject is at once a salt marsh at the edge of the Atlantic as well the significance she assigns to it after considering the original drawing, which was followed by the painting now on display at Gallery Arcturus.

Says Cullen, “This imposition of sense given to the natural environment is a way of paying tribute to it, the forms that emerge from the paintings are possibilities of representing the world; the pictorial space that of a frontier, somewhat between what was seen and what I have made of it.”

DOMINIQUE CRUCHET: Images in this exhibition focus on water and shorelines: human activity along these berms, beaches, bridges, docks, dams and embankments. Whether or not these facilities are destined to disappear (as seen in the photographs of demolition of the Palace of the People in Berlin, ghost villages of British Columbia, the construction of the Confederation Bridge to PEI, or the moraines of Alberta glaciers), Cruchet says he photographs “as an archaeologist collects certain objects -- to maintain or preserve in memory.”

 

More on DOMINIQUE CRUCHET:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=55

Works mentioned:  Deconstruction of People's Palace, Berlin

Ghost Town, Sandon, BC

Confederation Bridge construction site, Borden, PEI

Athabasca Glacier, Jasper National Park

 

More on JOAN CULLEN:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=56

Works mentioned: ©Joan Cullen, Sissable, Salt Marsh, oil on linen, 210 x 183cm, 2012

©Joan Cullen, Crossing the Great Waters, Traverser les grandes eaux. Ink on rag paper 950 x 113cm, 2012

 

Selected images and the official invitation can be seen at arcturus.ca under ‘Events’.

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-05-03-crossing-the-great-waters

Contact the gallery for publishable images.

Official CONTACT page: http://scotiabankcontactphoto.com/open-exhibitions/1545

The book "Crossing the Great Waters" can be seen HERE.

Find a Facebook page for the exhibit HERE and the reception HERE.

-- --

Opening Reception: Saturday, May 3, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Exhibit can be viewed from May 3 to June 14, 2014

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

Media contact:  Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

 

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto, Ontario   M5B 1G6

416-977-1077   http://arcturus.ca/

Exhibition

Photography and painting: the work of Dominique Cruchet and Joan Cullen

The exhibit “Crossing the great waters” fills the main exhibit space at Gallery Arcturus

TORONTO — Viewers are invited to see works in photography by Dominique Cruchet and painting by Joan Cullen, artists who share their time between France and Prince Edward Island. Their joint exposition “Crossing the great waters” opens Saturday, May 3 at Gallery Arcturus. Cruchet’s black and white prints and Cullen’s deeply coloured work in paint and ink fill the main gallery of this public art museum in downtown Toronto.

The phrase "crossing the great waters" frequently appears in the classic Chinese text I Ching. It signifies striking out into the unknown and unfamiliar, taking on possibly dangerous or difficult tasks. In the exhibition, Cruchet and Cullen have used this as a metaphor for exploring both the worlds these images point to and a dialogue between photography and painting, water the vehicle around which the works coalesce.

Dominique Cruchet’sphotography looks at vestiges of human activities along shore lines, river banks, beaches, waterways – in a way treating the constructions and traces of human passage as an archaeologist examines artefacts.

Joan Cullen's paintings explore life near or on water. Using vibrant colour and gesture, her works express the elemental: wind-swept grass, sky, water. She invites us to traverse these spaces in the company of a solitary animal or flock of birds. Or, as in the 29-foot wide title piece “Crossing the Great Waters, Traverser les grandes eaux”, large ships become small in a vast sea of blue.

The exhibit opens in the main space of Gallery Arcturus at 80 Gerrard Street East on Saturday, May 3 with a reception from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Details can be found at arcturus.ca or on Facebook.

JOAN CULLEN:  “My work has developed along certain themes which I return to again and again – integrity of place, natural elements as allegory, beauty as solace.” In ‘Sissable’ for example, the subject is at once a salt marsh at the edge of the Atlantic as well the significance she assigns to it after considering the original drawing, which was followed by the painting now on display at Gallery Arcturus.

Says Cullen, “This imposition of sense given to the natural environment is a way of paying tribute to it, the forms that emerge from the paintings are possibilities of representing the world; the pictorial space that of a frontier, somewhat between what was seen and what I have made of it.”

DOMINIQUE CRUCHET: Images in this exhibition focus on water and shorelines: human activity along these berms, beaches, bridges, docks, dams and embankments. Whether or not these facilities are destined to disappear (as seen in the photographs of demolition of the Palace of the People in Berlin, ghost villages of British Columbia, the construction of the Confederation Bridge to PEI, or the moraines of Alberta glaciers), Cruchet says he photographs “as an archaeologist collects certain objects -- to maintain or preserve in memory.”

 

More on DOMINIQUE CRUCHET:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=55

Works mentioned:  Deconstruction of People's Palace, Berlin

Ghost Town, Sandon, BC

Confederation Bridge construction site, Borden, PEI

Athabasca Glacier, Jasper National Park

 

More on JOAN CULLEN:  http://arcturus.ca/artist_gallery.php?a=56

Works mentioned: ©Joan Cullen, Sissable, Salt Marsh, oil on linen, 210 x 183cm, 2012

©Joan Cullen, Crossing the Great Waters, Traverser les grandes eaux. Ink on rag paper 950 x 113cm, 2012

 

Selected images and the official invitation can be seen at arcturus.ca under ‘Events’.

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2014-05-03-crossing-the-great-waters

Contact the gallery for publishable images.

Official CONTACT page: http://scotiabankcontactphoto.com/open-exhibitions/1545

The book "Crossing the Great Waters" can be seen HERE.

Find a Facebook page for the exhibit HERE and the reception HERE.

-- --

Opening Reception: Saturday, May 3, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Exhibit can be viewed from May 3 to June 14, 2014

Regular gallery hours: Tues - Fri 12 noon - 5:30pm; Sat 11am - 5:30pm

Media contact:  Ed Drass at 416-977-1077 or info@arcturus.ca

 

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto, Ontario   M5B 1G6

416-977-1077   http://arcturus.ca/

Crossing the great waters 320 Crossing the great waters Dominique Cruchet Joan Cullen A study of the show's central piece 7dMg2dt8AvY exhibit

collage gallery

Thu Jun 26 00:00:00 2014

visual sound poetry

art music videos made at Gallery Arcturus

with collage works, film clips

and compelling musical soundtracks

--

see on YouTube

Exhibition, Experience

collage gallery collage gallery Susan Valyi

sing -- an exploration

Tue Jun 24 00:00:00 2014

chins lift

the time to sing is called

as a word unravels and stretches along the shoreline

turns the corner of the room

and traces itself on empty walls.

The choir master's open-armed crescendo.

Exhibition

sing -- an exploration sing -- an exploration Floyd Kuptana

Up North Gallery

Sat Jan 10 00:00:00 2015

 

Features a compelling carved and painted landscape "Silver Peak" by Claustro, as well as rotating works of northern-inspired sculptures and paintings by Floyd Kuptana.

From the near north, the View the Work slideshow features the paintings by Eric McConnachie. His works may be viewed upon request in the Studio Workshop.

Exhibition

Up North Gallery Up North Gallery Carol Currie and Stuart Leggett Floyd Kuptana Eric McConnachie.

E.J. Gold Gallery

Thu Jan 15 13:53:00 2015

The E.J. Gold Gallery exhibits pieces from the permanent collection including works by E.J. Gold and members of the School of Reductionism

More work by E.J. Gold at  hei-art.com

Manifesto of Reductionism

The School of Reductionism was conceived in 1987 by E.J. Gold, Tom X and other members of the Grass Valley Graphics Group in northern California. The School consists of more than 20 American and Canadian painters and sculptors who have worked together to reformulate the aims and principles of contemporary visual art.

Reductionism is situated in the tradition of objective art which includes the Great Pyramids and the great cathedrals. It embodies both a philosophy of art and certain practical principles which infuse recognizable qualities into its art, and is therefore objective in nature. Reductionism centers on the extension of the boundaries of the possible within the laboratory of high aesthetic.

The philosophy of Reductionism places utmost value on the creative act which originates as an aesthetic perception and a corresponding state or condition of being. It is then the artist’s task to capture or express this perception in a work of art which enables the viewer to have the same experience. Reductionist art is an attempt at exact communication, not an exploration of the subjective states of the artist.

Although Reductionism in practice is broadly inclusive, experimental and evolving, its art is nonetheless often characterized by three basic qualities:

   Timelessness

Reductionism typically explores another dimension of time, a dimension which is not sequential or “horizontal” but eternal or “vertical” ... the same dimension of time which contains the creative act itself.  There is little or no explicit movement in Reductionist art.  Nothing is happening in the usual sense and time, therefore, does not pass. The result is an enhanced awareness of posture, positioning of visual elements and their interrelationships. Freezing the frame, rendering objects static, also has the effect of freeing other forms of movement such as feeling … motion through emotion.

   Essentialism

Reductionism often uses recognizable objects and is therefore representational. However, objects are important for their effect, not important in themselves. The artist attempts to achieve an effect with the fewest possible lines and details, removing extraneous elements which may deviate or obscure the effect...thus the name Reductionism. Objects are reduced to their essentials in a move toward the abstract. Similarly, colour is used unambiguously and powerfully to enhance its effect. Colours are often few, vibrant, sharply contrasting.

   Space

Perhaps the outstanding feature of Reductionist art is that, despite a limited use of the techniques of perspective to create three dimensional effects within the picture, the art nonetheless establishes a sense of space. The reason is the primary place assigned to the viewer. Because the Reductionist artist strives for communication, scenes are composed for a viewer who is not a voyeur outside the scene but rather a participant who is the reason for the work and necessarily a part of it. Everything in the scene is oriented first and foremost to the viewer so as to bring the viewer into a relationship with it. Thus, the art is only completed by viewing. Depth of field is therefore not bounded by the frame but includes the viewer in a truly three dimensional experience of space.

http://www.hei-art.com/about/manifest.html

This is a media release

Exhibition

This is a media release

E.J. Gold Gallery E.J. Gold Gallery E.J. Gold Dan Walsh RC Trice

Ascending Gallery

Sat Jul 18 00:00:00 2015

'shades of black and white' is another chapter in Daniel Hanequand's work.
In these pieces, the figures seem to be sculpted from graphite, not drawn.
It appears that he somehow breathes the figures onto the page, where they
emerge from shadow and are revealed as a receding light touches them.

Also showing in the Ascending Gallery are works by Barbara Kellam, Susan Valyi, Sae Kimura and deborah harris.

Daniel Hanequand 1938 - 2013
l o o k i n g  t o  s e e

Exhibition, Experience

Ascending Gallery 320 Ascending Gallery deborah harris Simeon Posen Adrian Symonds

inclined planes -- trees -- the mattes

Sat May 12 00:00:00 2012

Experience, Preview

inclined planes -- trees -- the mattes inclined planes -- trees -- the mattes

Vivian Felsen

Fri Jan 23 00:00:00 2015

Vivian Felsen has been exhibiting her paintings for over 30 years. During that time she has participated in numerous group shows and juried exhibitions including the Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition, the Ontario Society of Artists, and the Society of Canadian Artists. Her work has been shown in private and public galleries, including the Palacio das Artes, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, and since 2007 at the Gallery Arcturus.

Vivian has taught drawing and painting through the Toronto Board of Education (Adult and Continuing Education), and for many years at Max the Mutt College of Animation, Art and Design. 

 About the Artists’ Workshops at Gallery Arcturus:

"The gallery for me is a magical space – calm and peaceful yet charged with energy and excitement. Unusual objects, mysterious collages and exotic music all serve to heighten the senses and stir the imagination, as does the presence of other artists and what they produce. Although none of the participating artists the same way, or sees the same way, and despite the fact that we are each totally absorbed in our own work, I am somehow influenced by others. The painting on my canvas is unlike any I have done before. Strange, satisfying, unexpected. Magic!"

 

Some images at Art Dialogue here

A book created for the exhibit Stories from the Ancestors available here at Blurb

Artist

Vivian Felsen Vivian Felsen

Norman Allan

Fri Jan 23 00:00:00 2015

Norman Allan taught himself to draw faces sitting in the Future Bakery, and then to paint/draw (on wood) more at the Arts and Letters Club's Sunday life sessions. He’d say, “I scribble. In a sense, I throw myself at the canvas. I usually start by scribbling a brow and an eye and then go on 'til it, the picture, ‘works’. And I can usually stop in time!” 

Norman thinks highly of his work, saying, “It’s been pointed out to me (if I may boast) that while my hand is distinctive, recognizable (and original, as far as 'expressionism' goes), no two pieces are quite alike stylistically. There is an inventiveness!”

http://www.normanallan.com/Lit/introLit.html

Artist

Norman Allan Norman Allan

looking for you, looking for me

Sat Feb 7 00:00:00 2015

classic western and eastern icons

carefully placed on paper and board by visiting Italian artist

emanuele balzani

 

see the artist's Facebook page

and

an art music video of previous work

Exhibition

looking for you, looking for me 320 looking for you, looking for me emanuele balzani

Genesis Gallery

Tue Feb 10 00:00:00 2015

Exhibition

Genesis Gallery Genesis Gallery Ramona Zoladek deborah harris

Up North - Painting the Weather Up North

Mon Jan 17 00:00:00 2011

January 17, 2011

Up North - Painting the Weather Up North 160 Up North - Painting the Weather Up North Terri Quinn Eric McConnachie deborah harris

Collage Workshop

Sat Nov 12 13:45:00 2016

More about collage workshops here

Collage Workshop

Collage Workshop Collage Workshop

faces of woman

dblspc

Thu Jun 18 15:54:00 2015

Saturday September 19, 2015 2 - 5 p.m.

deborah harris highlights the different facets of woman. In twenty-two
collages and poems, each a variation of a single photo, 'woman' as a singular
is somehow able to express the multiple identities that each of us
as women occupy throughout the course of our lives. This exhibit
has expanded to include fabric assemblage by Sae Kimura.

On exhibit in the Genesis Gallery through September 26, 2015.

Fabric assemblage continues on display through October.

Closing reception: Saturday September 19, 2015 - 2 - 5 p.m.

-

 

woman in a photograph

standing right foreground

battle in the background

men loading a cannon

still smoking from a firing

a civil war re-enactment

an image I am drawn to.

 

-

I came upon this image in National Geographic magazine, issued May 2012,

original photograph by Richard Barnes.

It is one of a series of photos seeking to authentically portray the events

of the civil war, evoking what Barnes calls, 'the slippage of time'.

Without knowing any of the history of the photo I was simply inspired by the

presence of this woman. I duplicated the image and began to alter small details,

of the face, hands, some aspect of attire or what might be in the basket. Each

small change introduced another identity but still held at its core something of the

essence visible in the original photo. This series became 'faces of woman',

woman as a singular because 'she' is somehow able to express the multiple

identities that each of us as women occupy throughout the course of our lives.

- deborah harris,  2015

genesis

Exhibition

faces of woman 160 faces of woman collages with text 9t_SDguBkps exhibit faces of woman lPgaFHMcAHo exhibit

the listening studio

Thu Jun 25 17:54:00 2015

t h e  l i s t e n i n g   s t u d i o  improvising departure

"The problem with listening, of course, is that we don't."

  - Philip Glass

 

This spring, my father Lenny Boyd died. It was both heart breaking and heart opening - I am not sure you can experience one without the other.

During the month of May until his passage on June 6th I made the daily trek from downtown Toronto up to Richmond Hill where we would meet in his palliative room.  During this shared time we visited spaces that were rarely touched in our previous forty-eight years together.

The identifications of father and son waned. Nostalgia was not evoked. We were two men sitting together listening. The timbre of the room was clear and gentle. The exchanges between us ordinary yet not, we had this time with no promise of any continuation.

No urge to be sentimental of what had been, we were released into intimate spaces where the past was not required and the future offered nothing to invest in. In palliative care the only outcome would be his last breath.

Without hope or regret we entered the present – and improvised.

It was sad, beautiful and tender to be with him as he was. I met Lenny the music teacher, the musician, a friend, a brother – roles which he had cherished but was no longer.  He was simply a man with a few days to wait till his departure, days which, surprisingly, turned into weeks. His senses were alert, eyes wide open, ears receptive ... and I responded.

It seems peculiar that we met in a hospital room, a room where Lenny was waiting to die, a room where others have previously died, a room where he lived until ... with his last breath ... the room became vacant, ready for another to wait for their death.

This show is an attempt to communicate those spaces we occupied as we improvised departure, during my last days with Lenny.

Eron Boyd                                                                                                                               June 26 2015

collage

Exhibition

the listening studio the listening studio

PHYSIOGNOMY

Sat Oct 31 14:00:00 2015

Saturday, October 31, 2015. 2pm - 5pm

PHYSIOGNOMY...face as an index to character


A group of collage portraits incorporating animal features to reveal the human.

Includes work by Kimberly Pettit, Shelly Sawada, Floyd Kuptana, Peter Gowans, Eron Boyd

The reception for this exhibit, and for the Genesis Gallery show MASKED EXPOSURE are on

Saturday October 31, 2015, 2 to 5pm

More to be added soon... and see the Facebook page for this event

--

Gallery Arcturus is a contemporary art museum displaying sculpture, painting and other media.

The Collage Gallery exhibits unique artworks including those by artist-in-residence deborah harris and participants of the gallery's collage workshops.

collage

Exhibition

PHYSIOGNOMY 160 PHYSIOGNOMY

MASKED exposure . . . the hidden revealed

Thu Oct 1 12:51:00 2015

Saturday, October 31, 2015. 2pm - 5pm

a mixed media exploration of masks by Sae Kimura, deborah harris, Vivian Felsen

Visit work in process beginning October 14 and a reception is October 31 at 2pm

Masks in collage, painting and assemblage have been created in, and are displayed throughout the Genesis Gallery.

-

Gallery Arcturus is a contemporary art museum displaying sculpture, painting and other media.

genesis

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition, Reception

MASKED exposure . . . the hidden revealed 160 MASKED exposure . . . the hidden revealed Sae Kimura Vivian Felsen deborah harris

in the shadow of song

Sat Dec 5 14:00:00 2015

Saturday, December 5, 2015. 2- 5pm

IN THE SHADOW OF SONG: A creation story in mixed media

Dec 5, 2015 - Jan 30, 2016 

a meeting of friends:
Joan Cullen, Dominique Cruchet, Luke Gilliam, Floyd Kuptana, Barbara Kellam, Ramona Zoladek, deborah harris, Sae Kimura, Vivian Felsen, Eron Boyd, Camie Geary-Martin

-This exhibit on display in the Genesis Gallery includes sculpture of wood, stone, concrete, bronze; painting in oil, inks and acrylic; photographs; collage.

“The music echoes in the emptiness. It reminds us where we came from and where we’re bound.”  David Mutti Clark

 

Regular hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 - 5:30pm; Saturday 11am - 5:30pm

genesis

Exhibition, Reception

in the shadow of song 160 in the shadow of song Joan Cullen Ramona Zoladek Luke Gilliam

Unsentimental SCANDAL

Sat Dec 5 14:00:00 2015

Saturday December 5, 2015. 2 - 5 pm

a brilliant piece of mercilessly serious comedy
collage; a medium of unreverential meticulousness

Through December in the Collage Gallery

-works by Maya Rain, Eron Boyd, Emanuele Balzani, Floyd Kuptana, deborah harris, Sae Kimura and Shelly Sawada

See the Facebook page with more images here

collage

Exhibition, Reception

Unsentimental SCANDAL 160 Unsentimental SCANDAL Eron Boyd Sae Kimura Maya Rain

Along for the Ride -- with Simeon Posen

Sat May 7 14:00:00 2016

Saturday, May, 2016. 2 5 pm

Simeon Posen has been fascinated by the brash excitement and engineering marvels of the midway since he was a young boy and for the last seventeen years he has explored this by photographing the rides and their spinning lights, recording their patterns of movement as they weave lines across the night sky. Using a Pentax with 400 film Posen has achieved a way for us to experience the sensation of speed and motion of a still image.

May 7 to June 18, 2016  See a video of his work on YouTube or here
Opening reception Saturday, May 7 from 2 to 5pm

ALONG FOR THE RIDE is part of CIRCUS, an exhibition that has moved in to the five galleries of Arcturus. Please see more on CIRCUS here and on Facebook


Part of the city-wide Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival
http://scotiabankcontactphoto.com/

genesis

Place Gallery Arcturus on your "Contact crawl" itinerary

 

Toronto gallery hosts magical photo exhibit with a CIRCUS atmosphere


CIRCUS, a multiple-media art installation in five exhibit spaces features ALONG FOR THE RIDE, a Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival exhibit by photographer Simeon Posen.

Opening Reception: May 7 at Gallery Arcturus in downtown Toronto

 

C I R C U S: Mystery and Delight Under the Big Top

This show was born in the main Genesis Gallery. Forms and sculptures from the Gallery’s vast permanent collection shape-shifted to become sideshow performers and parts of the big tent. New paintings were created and older ones resurrected to join the circus. The never-before-shown photographic Midway Series entitled ALONG FOR THE RIDE by Simeon Posen took up residence in the eastern annex of Genesis, becoming a magical, miniature, night-time midway expanse.

Exhibits at Gallery Arcturus evolve. Over the last two months, CIRCUS has slowly occupied all five gallery spaces. In the Up North Gallery, Floyd Kuptana's Inuit sculpture and whimsical new paintings lead to the Collage Gallery, home to the Fortune Teller and Reader of Cards. Viewers may sit in The E.J. Gold Gallery where they will meet the ‘Contortionists'.

Ascending to the fourth floor, you reach the source of a giant mobile which descends 60 feet through the spiralling staircase to the ground floor. This floating interpretation of circus was created on site by artist Sae Kimura in response to the carnival atmosphere.

Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris says: "The culmination of all the spaces is an amazing collaboration and cohesiveness of inspiration and surprise."


ALONG FOR THE RIDE – a photographic exhibit from the ‘Midway Series’ by Simeon Posen

Simeon Posen has been fascinated by the brash excitement and engineering marvels of the midway since he was a young boy. For the last seventeen years, he has explored this by photographing the rides and their spinning lights, recording their patterns of movement as they weave lines across the night sky. Using a Pentax with 400 film Posen has achieved a way for us to experience the sensation of speed and motion of a still image.

Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with work spanning more than four decades.

He studied photography with Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock and Brett Weston in California, and architecture at Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School, all of which contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs.

He works with 8 x 10, 4 x 5 and mid-size negative formats, hand developing the film materials and printing on silver fibre-based papers.

The Midway Lights Portfolio:

Writes Posen, "As twilight turns into night, the fair evolves into a magical place, as the coloured lights swirl into fleeting forms and passing outlines.

"I have been photographing Midway Lights every year since 1998. At first the camera was placed in a stationary position with a long single exposure on each frame. As the years have progressed I have been experimenting with multiple exposures on each frame and the camera moving across the scene. Because it is so experimental, I go into the darkroom each night and develop the negatives, then return the next evening to see if I can improve on the work of the evening before."

--

Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum run by a not-for-profit foundation located at 80 Gerrard Street East at Church Street. The gallery has hosted photographic exhibits in May since its founding in 1996, many of which have been part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

The reception for ALONG FOR THE RIDE and CIRCUS was May 7.

Regular hours are Tuesday to Saturday, noon to 5:30 p.m.

A short video entitled "crossing the threshold" was created at the gallery and captures a sense of the evolving installation in early April. See on YouTube here

A gallery of selected works are here:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-02-16-running-off-to-join-the-circus

Views of the exhibit to be posted here: http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-05-07-circus

Images of individual work are available.

 

Media contact: Ed Drass via info@arcturus.ca or the gallery at 416-977-1077

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto    arcturus.ca 

See Facebook events here: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus/

Supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art

Exhibition

Place Gallery Arcturus on your "Contact crawl" itinerary

 

Toronto gallery hosts magical photo exhibit with a CIRCUS atmosphere


CIRCUS, a multiple-media art installation in five exhibit spaces features ALONG FOR THE RIDE, a Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival exhibit by photographer Simeon Posen.

Opening Reception: May 7 at Gallery Arcturus in downtown Toronto

 

C I R C U S: Mystery and Delight Under the Big Top

This show was born in the main Genesis Gallery. Forms and sculptures from the Gallery’s vast permanent collection shape-shifted to become sideshow performers and parts of the big tent. New paintings were created and older ones resurrected to join the circus. The never-before-shown photographic Midway Series entitled ALONG FOR THE RIDE by Simeon Posen took up residence in the eastern annex of Genesis, becoming a magical, miniature, night-time midway expanse.

Exhibits at Gallery Arcturus evolve. Over the last two months, CIRCUS has slowly occupied all five gallery spaces. In the Up North Gallery, Floyd Kuptana's Inuit sculpture and whimsical new paintings lead to the Collage Gallery, home to the Fortune Teller and Reader of Cards. Viewers may sit in The E.J. Gold Gallery where they will meet the ‘Contortionists'.

Ascending to the fourth floor, you reach the source of a giant mobile which descends 60 feet through the spiralling staircase to the ground floor. This floating interpretation of circus was created on site by artist Sae Kimura in response to the carnival atmosphere.

Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris says: "The culmination of all the spaces is an amazing collaboration and cohesiveness of inspiration and surprise."


ALONG FOR THE RIDE – a photographic exhibit from the ‘Midway Series’ by Simeon Posen

Simeon Posen has been fascinated by the brash excitement and engineering marvels of the midway since he was a young boy. For the last seventeen years, he has explored this by photographing the rides and their spinning lights, recording their patterns of movement as they weave lines across the night sky. Using a Pentax with 400 film Posen has achieved a way for us to experience the sensation of speed and motion of a still image.

Simeon Posen is a landscape and architectural photographer with work spanning more than four decades.

He studied photography with Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock and Brett Weston in California, and architecture at Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School, all of which contribute to the unique perspective evident in his black and white photographs.

He works with 8 x 10, 4 x 5 and mid-size negative formats, hand developing the film materials and printing on silver fibre-based papers.

The Midway Lights Portfolio:

Writes Posen, "As twilight turns into night, the fair evolves into a magical place, as the coloured lights swirl into fleeting forms and passing outlines.

"I have been photographing Midway Lights every year since 1998. At first the camera was placed in a stationary position with a long single exposure on each frame. As the years have progressed I have been experimenting with multiple exposures on each frame and the camera moving across the scene. Because it is so experimental, I go into the darkroom each night and develop the negatives, then return the next evening to see if I can improve on the work of the evening before."

--

Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum run by a not-for-profit foundation located at 80 Gerrard Street East at Church Street. The gallery has hosted photographic exhibits in May since its founding in 1996, many of which have been part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

The reception for ALONG FOR THE RIDE and CIRCUS was May 7.

Regular hours are Tuesday to Saturday, noon to 5:30 p.m.

A short video entitled "crossing the threshold" was created at the gallery and captures a sense of the evolving installation in early April. See on YouTube here

A gallery of selected works are here:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-02-16-running-off-to-join-the-circus

Views of the exhibit to be posted here: http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-05-07-circus

Images of individual work are available.

 

Media contact: Ed Drass via info@arcturus.ca or the gallery at 416-977-1077

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto    arcturus.ca 

See Facebook events here: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus/

Supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art

Along for the Ride -- with Simeon Posen 320 Along for the Ride -- with Simeon Posen the midway series by Sim Posen v6PXCl_VPCY exhibit crossing the threshold S3OR3VrWpuw exhibit

CIRCUS in the Collage Gallery

Sat May 7 14:00:00 2016

The CIRCUS show has extended to all the exhibit spaces.

Please read all about CIRCUS here

collage

Exhibition

CIRCUS in the Collage Gallery CIRCUS in the Collage Gallery the jokers are wild HIdmAElbUVI visual sound poetry

Running off to join the circus

Tue Feb 16 12:00:00 2016

... is the beginning of a two month long process of building a 'circus'.

Vintage film has inspired participating artists to create paintings,

sculptures and various installations.

The construction of a miniature midway

features Simeon Posen's photographic 'Midway' series Along for the Ride.

--

The completed project will open on May 7.

Until then, we foresee that it will go through many iterations along the way,

all of which can be seen by curious visitors.

    See more images on Facebook

genesis

Artist's Workshop, Exhibition

Running off to join the circus 320 Running off to join the circus

CIRCUS

Sat May 7 14:00:00 2016

Saturday, May 7, 2016. 2 - 5 p.m.

The process of building this show began in the main Genesis Gallery. Forms and sculptures from the permanent collection shape shifted to evoke side show performers and parts of the big tent, new paintings were created and a few older ones were resurrected to join the circus. The never before shown photographic ‘Midway Series’ entitled Along for the Ride by Simeon Posen took up residence in the eastern annex of Genesis and has become a magical, miniature, night time midway expanse.

 

This exhibition was given more time than other shows to evolve. It has in the last two months moved to occupy all of the five gallery spaces. In the Up North Gallery Floyd Kuptana’s sculpture and whimsical recent paintings carry the theme to the Collage Gallery which is home to the Fortune Teller and Reader of Cards. The E.J. Gold Gallery is where the viewer will meet the ‘Contortionists’. Ascending to the fourth floor we are led to the source of a giant mobile which descends through the spiraling staircase to the ground floor. This floating interpretation of circus was created on site in response to the architectural space and carnival atmosphere by artist Sae Kimura.

 

Not to be missed is the Basement Studio which is the fertile ground where many of the creative seeds take root. Here we also discover a large collection of painted sketches by the artist Eric McConnachie, a northern Ontario artist who lives and works on site in the area west of Algonquin Park. Eric is able to bring an energy and immediacy to his work, reminiscent of one of his mentors Tom Thomson.

 

The culmination of all the spaces is an amazing collaboration and cohesiveness of inspiration and surprise.

For more on ALONG FOR THE RIDE, please see here

genesis

Place Gallery Arcturus on your "Contact crawl" itinerary

 

Toronto gallery hosts magical photo exhibit with a CIRCUS atmosphere


CIRCUS, a multiple-media art installation in five exhibit spaces features ALONG FOR THE RIDE, a Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival exhibit by photographer Simeon Posen.

Opening Reception: May 7 at Gallery Arcturus in downtown Toronto

 

C I R C U S: Mystery and Delight Under the Big Top

This show was born in the main Genesis Gallery. Forms and sculptures from the Gallery’s vast permanent collection shape-shifted to become sideshow performers and parts of the big tent. New paintings were created and older ones resurrected to join the circus. The never-before-shown photographic Midway Series entitled ALONG FOR THE RIDE by Simeon Posen took up residence in the eastern annex of Genesis, becoming a magical, miniature, night-time midway expanse.

Exhibits at Gallery Arcturus evolve. Over the last two months, CIRCUS has slowly occupied all five gallery spaces. In the Up North Gallery, Floyd Kuptana's Inuit sculpture and whimsical new paintings lead to the Collage Gallery, home to the Fortune Teller and Reader of Cards. Viewers may sit in The E.J. Gold Gallery where they will meet the ‘Contortionists'.

Ascending to the fourth floor, you reach the source of a giant mobile which descends 60 feet through the spiralling staircase to the ground floor. This floating interpretation of circus was created on site by artist Sae Kimura in response to the carnival atmosphere.

Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris says: "The culmination of all the spaces is an amazing collaboration and cohesiveness of inspiration and surprise."


ALONG FOR THE RIDE – a photographic exhibit from the ‘Midway Series’ by Simeon Posen

Simeon Posen has been fascinated by the brash excitement and engineering marvels of the midway since he was a young boy. For the last seventeen years, he has explored this by photographing the rides and their spinning lights, recording their patterns of movement as they weave lines across the night sky. Using a Pentax with 400 film Posen has achieved a way for us to experience the sensation of speed and motion of a still image.

Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum run by a not-for-profit foundation located at 80 Gerrard Street East at Church Street. The gallery has hosted photographic exhibits in May since its founding in 1996, many of which have been part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

The reception for ALONG FOR THE RIDE and CIRCUS is on May 7 is from 2 to 5 p.m. Regular hours are Tuesday to Saturday, noon to 5:30 p.m.

A short video entitled "crossing the threshold" was created at the gallery and captures a sense of the evolving installation in early April. See on YouTube here

A gallery of selected works are here:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-02-16-running-off-to-join-the-circus

Views of the exhibit to be posted here: http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-05-07-circus

Images of individual work are available.

 

Media contact: Ed Drass via cell 647-393-6397 or info@arcturus.ca or the gallery at 416-977-1077

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto    arcturus.ca    416-977-1077

See Facebook events here: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus/

Supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art

Exhibition, Reception

Place Gallery Arcturus on your "Contact crawl" itinerary

 

Toronto gallery hosts magical photo exhibit with a CIRCUS atmosphere


CIRCUS, a multiple-media art installation in five exhibit spaces features ALONG FOR THE RIDE, a Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival exhibit by photographer Simeon Posen.

Opening Reception: May 7 at Gallery Arcturus in downtown Toronto

 

C I R C U S: Mystery and Delight Under the Big Top

This show was born in the main Genesis Gallery. Forms and sculptures from the Gallery’s vast permanent collection shape-shifted to become sideshow performers and parts of the big tent. New paintings were created and older ones resurrected to join the circus. The never-before-shown photographic Midway Series entitled ALONG FOR THE RIDE by Simeon Posen took up residence in the eastern annex of Genesis, becoming a magical, miniature, night-time midway expanse.

Exhibits at Gallery Arcturus evolve. Over the last two months, CIRCUS has slowly occupied all five gallery spaces. In the Up North Gallery, Floyd Kuptana's Inuit sculpture and whimsical new paintings lead to the Collage Gallery, home to the Fortune Teller and Reader of Cards. Viewers may sit in The E.J. Gold Gallery where they will meet the ‘Contortionists'.

Ascending to the fourth floor, you reach the source of a giant mobile which descends 60 feet through the spiralling staircase to the ground floor. This floating interpretation of circus was created on site by artist Sae Kimura in response to the carnival atmosphere.

Gallery Arcturus artist-in-residence and curator Deborah Harris says: "The culmination of all the spaces is an amazing collaboration and cohesiveness of inspiration and surprise."


ALONG FOR THE RIDE – a photographic exhibit from the ‘Midway Series’ by Simeon Posen

Simeon Posen has been fascinated by the brash excitement and engineering marvels of the midway since he was a young boy. For the last seventeen years, he has explored this by photographing the rides and their spinning lights, recording their patterns of movement as they weave lines across the night sky. Using a Pentax with 400 film Posen has achieved a way for us to experience the sensation of speed and motion of a still image.

Gallery Arcturus is a public art museum run by a not-for-profit foundation located at 80 Gerrard Street East at Church Street. The gallery has hosted photographic exhibits in May since its founding in 1996, many of which have been part of the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival.

The reception for ALONG FOR THE RIDE and CIRCUS is on May 7 is from 2 to 5 p.m. Regular hours are Tuesday to Saturday, noon to 5:30 p.m.

A short video entitled "crossing the threshold" was created at the gallery and captures a sense of the evolving installation in early April. See on YouTube here

A gallery of selected works are here:

http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-02-16-running-off-to-join-the-circus

Views of the exhibit to be posted here: http://arcturus.ca/display.php?s=2016-05-07-circus

Images of individual work are available.

 

Media contact: Ed Drass via cell 647-393-6397 or info@arcturus.ca or the gallery at 416-977-1077

Gallery Arcturus, 80 Gerrard St. East, Toronto    arcturus.ca    416-977-1077

See Facebook events here: https://www.facebook.com/GalleryArcturus/

Supported by The Foundation for the Study of Objective Art

CIRCUS 320 CIRCUS crossing the threshold S3OR3VrWpuw exhibit the jokers are wild HIdmAElbUVI exhibit the midway series by Sim Posen v6PXCl_VPCY exhibit

CIRCUS in the Up North Gallery

Sat May 7 12:00:00 2016

The CIRCUS show has extended to all the exhibit spaces. Read more here

up_north

Exhibition

CIRCUS in the Up North Gallery CIRCUS in the Up North Gallery

CIRCUS in the Ascending Gallery

Sat May 7 12:00:00 2016

The CIRCUS show has extended to all the exhibit spaces. Read more here

ascending

Exhibition

CIRCUS in the Ascending Gallery CIRCUS in the Ascending Gallery

CIRCUS in the EJ Gold Gallery

Sat May 7 12:00:00 2016

>> Featuring ... The Contortionists! <<

The CIRCUS show has extended to all the exhibit spaces. Read more here

e.j._gold

Exhibition

CIRCUS in the EJ Gold Gallery CIRCUS in the EJ Gold Gallery

a tenuous balance

Tue Jul 12 16:24:00 2016

An exhibit in the Genesis Gallery.

a series of wood assemblages constructed by simply using weight, gravity and balance to secure their forms

--

All of the sculptures in the gallery exhibit space

are very carefully assembled using gravity 

weight and tension to achieve a stable but

tenuous balance and must therefore be

approached with stillness and attention.

     (No glue, nails or screws have been used)

This is in fact the intention of the work, to

engage the quiet attention of you the viewer

in the sensation of precise and precariously

placed, seemingly unrelated forms.

Perhaps this observation will allow you to

reflect upon the balancing act that we are called

on to perform as humans on this earth.

--

See posts on the creation of this exhibit at The Daily News:

It's About Balance

The Momentum of Change

A Tenuous Balance

Oasis

Me and My Shadow

genesis

Exhibition

a tenuous balance 160 a tenuous balance

Sidewalk Art Sale - Postponed

Thu Jul 28 14:00:00 2016

Outside the gallery, featuring work for sale by the artists

Sae Kimura, Floyd Kuptana, Vivian Felsen, deborah harris, Eron Boyd

Collage, Paintings, Cards, Drawings, Prints ...

--

Originally scheduled for this week, the event has been postponed

Experience

Sidewalk Art Sale - Postponed Sidewalk Art Sale - Postponed

here on earth: becoming what we do

Tue Sep 6 12:00:00 2016

This series is part of a reveal of Daniel Hanequand's life's work.

Sculptures created in response to Daniel's work by deborah harris.

"Art is a language we can learn.

In art we can discover another view of self.

Daniel's work speaks fluently and surprises us

by giving shape to the merging

of doing and being."

collage

Exhibition

here on earth: becoming what we do 320 here on earth: becoming what we do

Reception for Visited by Chance

Sat Sep 17 14:00:00 2016

Visited by Chance

Launch of the book of prose “Visited by Chance – Happenings of an Unexpected Kind

-

We are inviting you to a reception

in honour of James LaTrobe

celebrating the completion of his final book,

his life and his work.

-

Saturday, September 17 from 2 to 5 pm

3 pm: reading of the text

refreshments will be served

genesis

Reception

Reception for Visited by Chance 160 Reception for Visited by Chance

"a tenuous balance" shown with "visited by chance"

Fri Sep 16 17:46:00 2016

 


Th sculptures which have become  'a  t e n u o u s  b a l a n c e'
began with the taking down of the exhibit  'C I R C U S'.
Materials from that exhibit, incorporated with other found objects,
were assembled using gravity, weight and tension to achieve a stable but tenuous balance.
What was experienced from creating this work is a sensation of how precarious and
precise balance is.  Being in proximity to the sculptures seems to be a tangible reminder
of how life itself is a tenuous balance.

During this time a very dear friend of ours at the gallery, Jamie LaTrobe, passed away.
He had just completed a book of short stories of his life entitled, 'Visited by Chance'.
We invited the launch of this book to be held here at the gallery, accompanied by a
selection from his extensive body of photographic work.  These pieces have been hung
in relation to the sculptures of 'a tenuous balance' along with excerpts from his book.
Together they seem to convey a poignancy about life and death which goes beyond the personal.

 

More work by James LaTrobe can be seen at http://dragonwhistle.ca/

 

genesis

Exhibition

320

here on earth: a human landscape

Sun Sep 11 00:04:00 2016

A grouping of drawings by Daniel Hanequand

Showing from September 11 - November 26, 2016

Daniel Hanequand 1938 - 2013
l o o k i n g  t o  s e e

e.j._gold

Exhibition

here on earth: a human landscape 320 here on earth: a human landscape

here on earth: life entering form

Fri Oct 7 11:00:00 2016

Saturday October 29, 2016 2:00pm to 5:00pm

 


The late Daniel Hanequand (1938 - 2013) is being introduced to visitors through chapters of his life's work on display in each of the five gallery spaces of Arcturus. Over the next six months, each space will focus on a particular body of his work beginning with his earliest pencil work and finishing with his most recently completed paintings.

In the Genesis Gallery on the main floor, the chapter is titled 'life entering form'. Hanequand's very refined drawing skill and surprising vision of human form and interaction is seen unframed and hung making use of an installation by visiting artist Ramona Zoladek'tenuous balance'  assemblages by deborah harris and soap stone sculptures by Inuit artist Floyd Kuptana. All the works appear to echo and converse with each other, allowing us to see details in each that we may otherwise overlook.

Daniel Hanequand 1938 - 2013
l o o k i n g  t o  s e e
genesis

Exhibition

here on earth: life entering form 320 here on earth: life entering form

what is necessity?

Thu Dec 1 23:30:00 2016

what is necessity?

genesis

Exhibition

what is necessity? what is necessity? - Gallery Arcturus

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